Virginia Movers Top Rated

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379 Movers in Virginia

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LAST REVIEW

3 5 Reviewed 3 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - S Carter

“These guys were great- very efficient, hard wor...”

“These guys were great- very efficient, hard workers, careful with our stuff, wrapped up all the furniture. They went ...”

United States Virginia

LAST REVIEW

3 5 Reviewed 3 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Marcie

“Terrible! Do Not Use This Company. I paid for a...”

“Terrible! Do Not Use This Company. I paid for a mobile home to be moved and set up. Only half the job was done yet Bo...”

United States Virginia

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Cesar C.

“What an extraordinary ordeal. Great cost, excep...”

“What an extraordinary ordeal. Great cost, exceptionally well mannered, proficient group. The team were amazing. You w...”

United States Virginia

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - K

“Clark transfer did a small move for me an I can...”

“Clark transfer did a small move for me an I can't say enough good things about them they were on time, very polite wo...”

United States Virginia

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Bradley Carson

“Very professional moving company. I needed a sh...”

“Very professional moving company. I needed a shipment picked up and stored in their warehouse. Brian came and explain...”

United States Virginia

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Ryan Y.

“Once arriving, the movers did not in the slight...”

“Once arriving, the movers did not in the slightest degree appear as though they were slowing down for time. They were...”

United States Virginia

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Ted Hoover

“A phenomenal moving company! Cannot praise the ...”

“A phenomenal moving company! Cannot praise the moving team, Santos, & staff enough!”

United States Virginia

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - John W

“I can not prescribe this moving organization as...”

“I can not prescribe this moving organization as they never appeared.”

United States Virginia

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Derek L

“Best movers ever!!! They are awesome and very f...”

“Best movers ever!!! They are awesome and very fairly priced:) thanks so much for making our move so much easier!”

United States Virginia

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jonathan C.

“These guys are extremely quick and efficient in...”

“These guys are extremely quick and efficient in what they do! Ive never seen movers move this quickly to get the job ...”

United States Virginia

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Kelvin C

“The all female group that you all sent over to ...”

“The all female group that you all sent over to my habitation on 09 June 2015 was great. Of the considerable number of...”

United States Virginia

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Heidi T

“They have taken an enormous weight off our shou...”

“They have taken an enormous weight off our shoulders for our turn by giving an overview of our possessions, moving ou...”

United States Virginia

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - DG

“THEY DID NOT COME. We scheduled our move weeks ...”

“THEY DID NOT COME. We scheduled our move weeks in advance. They were supposed to arrive at 8:30 AM and they called at...”

United States Virginia

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Basset

“Amazing moving company! They made a potentially...”

“Amazing moving company! They made a potentially stressful event seem seamless. Kind, courteous, and efficient, despi...”

United States Virginia

LAST REVIEW

2 5 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Missy P.

“Justin, our assessor, made a brilliant showing....”

“Justin, our assessor, made a brilliant showing. He was exceptionally proficient and permitted us to shadow him and po...”

United States Virginia

How To Find the Best Virginia Moving Companies


Before you get a free moving quote for the best Virginia moving companies, it pays to do some research. Read interstate Virginia moving reviews before getting a Virginia movers cost estimate. Moving Authority has what you need to select a cross country mover. We provide Virginia interstate movers with discount relocation rates. The best Virginia movers are also listed in local moving company reviews. If you need a state to state moving company or you're staying local, the best Virginia priced movers are here. During the process of moving within Virginia, check Moving Authority for moving tips.

A moving cost estimate for local movers in Virginia is a cinch to obtain. If you want self service movers to move your furniture, you'll hire an American moving company to do just that. But what about getting free moving estimates for movers who will go the extra mile? Virginia long distance movers work hard to provide the best car transport in Virginia. Moving Authority provides Virginia moving company reviews for every level of service to help you make the right choice.



4 Terrible Reasons Your Moving Quote is So Low

  • If you're quoted less than $70 per hour by movers Virginia, there's a good chance that this company doesn't insure its workers with Workman's Compensation Insurance. If that's the case and someone in injured on your property, YOU are the responsible party.
  • If the company doesn't have the proper auto insurance and federal licensing, they could be offering heavily discounted rates in order to lure customers that ordinarily wouldn't do business with them.
  • Professional VA moving companies invest lots of money in their crews. Illegitimate companies tend to hire day laborers with no skills or passion for the moving industry.
  • Con artists are unfortunately lurking out there, and always looking to scam unsuspecting customers. If your price seems too good to be true, it probably is.


The 5 Best-Kept Secrets of Virginia

  • Centrally located. Did you know that half of the United States can be reached from Virginia by car in just one day? Now you do!
  • Variety. From beaches to mountains, you’ll never look for a way to enjoy Mother Nature.
  • Shaping Up. Virginia is a place where many marathons, triathlons, mud races and other sport competitions are held annually.
  • Seasons Change. All four seasons are beautifully present here, and you get to experience them every few months.
  • Southern Hospitality. Despite being in the center of the United States, Virginians are no strangers when it comes to manners.




The Ultimate City for Work-Life Balance: Alexandria, Virginia

  • Less than ten miles from DC—perfect for those who work in the capitol and want to leave work at work.
  • One of the USA’s most literate areas—helping to foster brainpower on and off the clock.
  • Quiet life packed into a flourishing town—whether you crave a tranquil day to relax or a fun event to attend, Alexandria has it all.
  • Inexpensive and safe—this city is a fantastic place to raise a family, as the rates for crime and cost of living are low.

4 Aspects of Furniture Movers in VA That Will Save You Time and Money

  • How much large furniture needs to be moved? This is the first step in determining a price point for furniture movers.
  • Will you need storage? It’s common during a move that some of the items in the origin will need to be placed in a storage facility rather than into the new place.
  • What do you do with extra stuff? If you have too much furniture and don’t want to put it in storage, consider selling it with a yard sale, online through a service like Craigslist or eBay, or even with friends and family.
  • If all else fails, donate. Many churches can use your old, unwanted furniture, and so can charities. Check out the philanthropy route by asking local churches and charities about what they need, or even giving to a national charity like The American Red Cross or Goodwill.




Do you know?

Do you know quotes

In many countries, driving a truck requires a special driving license. The requirements and limitations vary with each different jurisdiction.

In the United States, the term 'full trailer' is used for a freight trailer supported by front and rear axles and pulled by a drawbar. This term is slightly different in Europe, where a full trailer is known as an A-frame drawbar trail. A full trailer is 96 or 102 in (2.4 or 2.6 m) wide and 35 or 40 ft (11 or 12 m) long.

The Motor Carrier Act, passed by Congress in 1935, replace the code of competition. The authorization the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) place was to regulate the trucking industry. Since then the ICC has been long abolished, however, it did quite a lot during its time. Based on the recommendations given by the ICC, Congress enacted the first hours of services regulation in 1938. This limited driving hours of truck and bus drivers. In 1941, the ICC reported that inconsistent weight limitation imposed by the states cause problems to effective interstate truck commerce.

In 2009, the book 'Trucking Country: The Road to America's Walmart Economy' debuted, written by author Shane Hamilton. This novel explores the interesting history of trucking and connects certain developments. Particularly how such development in the trucking industry have helped the so-called big-box stored. Examples of these would include Walmart or Target, they dominate the retail sector of the U.S. economy. Yet, Hamilton connects historical and present-day evidence that connects such correlations.

With the partial deregulation of the trucking industry in 1980 by the Motor Carrier Act, trucking companies increased. The workforce was drastically de-unionized. As a result, drivers received a lower pay overall. Losing its spotlight in the popular culture, trucking had become less intimate as some unspoken competition broke out. However, the deregulation only increased the competition and productivity with the trucking industry as a whole. This was beneficial to the America consumer by reducing costs. In 1982 the Surface Transportation Assistance Act established a federal minimum truck weight limits. Thus, trucks were finally standardized truck size and weight limits across the country. This was also put in to place so that across country traffic on the Interstate Highways resolved the issue of the 'barrier states'.

Very light trucks. Popular in Europe and Asia, many mini-trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles, usually with monocoque bodies. Specialized designs with substantial frames such as the Italian Piaggio shown here are based upon Japanese designs (in this case by Daihatsu) and are popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities that often have very narrow alleyways. Regardless of the name, these small trucks serve a wide range of uses. In Japan, they are regulated under the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break on taxes for buying a smaller and less-powerful vehicle (currently, the engine is limited to 660 ccs {0.66L} displacement). These vehicles are used as on-road utility vehicles in Japan. These Japanese-made mini trucks that were manufactured for on-road use are competing with off-road ATVs in the United States, and import regulations require that these mini trucks have a 25 mph (40 km/h) speed governor as they are classified as low-speed vehicles. These vehicles have found uses in construction, large campuses (government, university, and industrial), agriculture, cattle ranches, amusement parks, and replacements for golf carts.Major mini truck manufacturers and their brands: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishi Minicab, Subaru Sambar, Suzuki Carry   As with many things in Europe and Asia, the illusion of delicacy and proper manners always seems to attract tourists. Popular in Europe and Asia, mini trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles with monochrome bodies. Such specialized designs with such great frames such as the Italian Piaggio, based upon Japanese designs. In this case it was based upon Japanese designs made by Daihatsu. These are very popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities, which often have very narrow alleyways. Despite whatever name they are called, these very light trucks serve a wide variety of purposes.   Yet, in Japan they are regulated under the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break in taxes for buying a small and less-powerful vehicle. Currently, the engine is limited to 660 cc [0.66L] displacement. These vehicles began being used as on-road utility vehicles in Japan. Classified as a low speed vehicle, these Japanese-made mini trucks were manufactured for on-road use for competing the the off-road ATVs in the United States. Import regulations require that the mini trucks have a 25 mph (40km/h) speed governor. Again, this is because they are low speed vehicles.   However, these vehicles have found numerous amounts of ways to help the community. They invest money into the government, universities, amusement parks, and replacements for golf cars. They have some major Japanese mini truck manufacturarers as well as brands such as: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishit Minicab, Subaru Sambar, and Suzuki Carry.

In the United States, a commercial driver's license is required to drive any type of commercial vehicle weighing 26,001 lb (11,794 kg) or more. In 2006 the US trucking industry employed 1.8 million drivers of heavy trucks.

In 1978 Sylvester Stallone starred in the film "F.I.S.T.". The story is loosely based on the 'Teamsters Union'. This union is a labor union which includes truck drivers as well as its then president, Jimmy Hoffa.

The American Trucking Associations initiated in 1985 with the intent to improve the industry's image. With public opinion declining the association tried numerous moves. One such move was changing the name of the "National Truck Rodeo" to the "National Driving Championship". This was due to the fact that the word rodeo seemed to imply recklessness and reckless driving.

AMSA wanted to help consumers avoid untrustworthy or illegitimate movers. In January 2008, AMSA created the ProMover certification program for its members. As a member, you must have federal interstate operating authority. Members are also required to pass an annual criminal back check, be licensed by the FMCSA, and agree to abide by ethical standards. This would include honesty in advertising and in business transaction with customers. Each must also sign a contract committing to adhere to applicable Surface Transportation Board and FMCSA regulations. AMSA also takes into consideration and examines ownership. They are very strict, registration with state corporation commissions. This means that the mover must maintain at least a satisfactory rating with the Better Business Bureau (BBB). As one can imagine, those that pass are authorized to display the ProMove logo on the websites and in marketing materials. However, those that fail will be expelled from the program (and AMSA) if they cannot correct discrepancies during probation.

The United States Department of Transportation has become a fundamental necessity in the moving industry. It is the pinnacle of the industry, creating and enforcing regulations for the sake of safety for both businesses and consumers alike. However, it is notable to appreciate the history of such a powerful department. The functions currently performed by the DOT were once enforced by the Secretary of Commerce for Transportation. In 1965, Najeeb Halaby, administrator of the Federal Aviation Adminstration (FAA), had an excellent suggestion. He spoke to the current President Lyndon B. Johnson, advising that transportation be elevated to a cabinet level position. He continued, suggesting that the FAA be folded or merged, if you will, into the DOT. Clearly, the President took to Halaby's fresh ideas regarding transportation, thus putting the DOT into place.

As of January 1, 2000, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) was established as its own separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation. This came about under the "Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999". The FMCSA is based in Washington, D.C., employing more than 1,000 people throughout all 50 States, including in the District of Columbia. Their staff dedicates themselves to the improvement of safety among commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and to saving lives.

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.   The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

The word cargo is in reference to particular goods that are generally used for commercial gain. Cargo transportation is generally meant to mean by ship, boat, or plane. However, the term now applies to all types of freight, now including goods carried by train, van, or truck. This term is now used in the case of goods in the cold-chain, as perishable inventory is always cargo in transport towards its final home. Even when it is held in climate-controlled facilities, it is important to remember perishable goods or inventory have a short life.

Relocation, or moving, is the process of vacating a fixed location, such as a residence or business, and settling in a different one. A move might be to a nearby location such as in the same neighborhood or a much farther location in a different city or even a different country. Moving usually includes packing up all belongings, transferring them to the new location, and unpacking them. It will also be necessary to update administrative information. This includes tasks such as notifying the post office, changing registration data, change of insurance, services etc. It is important to remember this step in the relocation process. 

The USDOT (USDOT or DOT) is considered a federal Cabinet department within the U.S. government. Clearly, this department concerns itself with all aspects of transportation with safety as a focal point. The DOT was officially established by an act of Congress on October 15, 1966, beginning its operation on April 1, 1967. Superior to the DOT, the United States Secretary of Transportation governs the department. The mission of the DOT is to "Serve the United States by ensuring a fast, safe, efficient, accessible, and convenient transportation system that meets our vital national interests and enhances the quality of life for the American people, today and into the future." Essentially this states how important it is to improve all types of transportation as a way to enhance both safety and life in general etc. It is important to note that the DOT is not in place to hurt businesses, but to improve our "vital national interests" and our "quality of life". The transportation networks are in definite need of such fundamental attention. Federal departments such as the USDOT are key to this industry by creating and enforcing regulations with intentions to increase the efficiency and safety of transportation. 

Moving companies that operate within the borders of a particular state are usually regulated by the state DOT. Sometimes the public utility commission in that state will take care of it. This only applies to some of the U.S. states such as in California (California Public Utilities Commission) or Texas (Texas Department of Motor Vehicles. However, no matter what state you are in it is always best to make sure you are compliant with that state

Known as a truck in the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Puerto Rico, it is essentially a motor vehicle designed to transport cargo. Otherwise known as a lorry in the United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa, and Indian Subcontinent. Trucks vary not only in their types, but also in size, power, and configuration, the smallest being mechanically like an automobile. Commercial trucks may be very large and powerful, configured to mount specialized equipment. These are necessary in the case of fire trucks, concrete mixers, and suction excavators etc.