Alaska Movers Top Rated

(888) 787-7813

30 Movers in Alaska

Sponsored

LAST REVIEW

4 Reviewed 4 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Ky R Martin

“I don't think I could have experienced any bett...”

“I don't think I could have experienced any better of a moving company to use. they got out of the truck and we just s...”

United States Alaska

LAST REVIEW

4 Reviewed 4 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - test

“test”

“test”

United States Alaska

LAST REVIEW

4 Reviewed 4 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Wendy A.

“For those earlier pictures with damages on the ...”

“For those earlier pictures with damages on the boxes. I share your sentiment and I am sorry this happen to your boxes...”

United States Alaska

LAST REVIEW

3 Reviewed 3 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Anna Workman

“Best moving experience ever!! I highly recommen...”

“Best moving experience ever!! I highly recommend them to anyone. The Customer service was excellent and friendly. The...”

United States Alaska

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Jeff M.

“I've have been coming here for a long time. Nev...”

“I've have been coming here for a long time. Never a mistake. Mia Garcia dependably is by all accounts the one to help...”

United States Alaska

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Lisa B.

“They took phenomenal consideration of my furnit...”

“They took phenomenal consideration of my furniture, they worked rapidly and effectively and all the time with a grin....”

United States Alaska

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Brian V

“From booking the move to the move itself, the e...”

“From booking the move to the move itself, the entire procedure for us was wonderful and proficient. Our movers, Rober...”

United States Alaska

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Danielle T.

“This was another great experience. The crew ar...”

“This was another great experience. The crew arrived on time and were not only professional and polite, they were fun...”

United States Alaska

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Elijah W.

“This is an incredible moving company! I exceedi...”

“This is an incredible moving company! I exceedingly prescribe that you call them for your best course of action.”

United States Alaska

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Sylvia C.

“Subsequent to perusing their horrendous surveys...”

“Subsequent to perusing their horrendous surveys, I was somewhat reluctant to dispatch our stuff from San Diego to Haw...”

United States Alaska

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Stephanie McDonald

“From beginning to end and past, Alaska Terminal...”

“From beginning to end and past, Alaska Terminals Moving Company made my entire moving background simple, as well as v...”

United States Alaska

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Ryan M.

“Reserved a spot 5 months ahead of time for a 15...”

“Reserved a spot 5 months ahead of time for a 15 traveler van. They called to affirm 2(ish) weeks before our entry. ...”

United States Alaska

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Bev F.

“Much thanks to you Pacific Movers! Your staff i...”

“Much thanks to you Pacific Movers! Your staff is extraordinarily proficient start to finish. Administration is clearl...”

United States Alaska

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Silverster A.

“For one thing, I truly welcome the per thing ev...”

“For one thing, I truly welcome the per thing evaluating (altered cost in light of number/sort of things you need move...”

United States Alaska

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Carl K.

“These folks from the minute they strolled throu...”

“These folks from the minute they strolled through my entryway were in mammoth mode. Inviting and tender mammoth mode....”

United States Alaska

Find Your Alaska Movers Below

Is moving to Alaska in your future? Then you'll need the top state to state moving company to get you there. The best Alaska moving companies are here on Moving Authority, but that's not all. You can also find a comprehensive Alaska movers cost estimate for the best Alaska movers. We give you the power to spot discount relocation rates and learn excellent moving tips. You'll need an exceptional cross country mover to make the interstate move. Luckily, we offer free information on the best Alaska priced movers. Alaska interstate movers are also easy to find on Moving Authority. If you're moving within Alaska, read local Alaska moving company reviews. Get a free moving quote, read interstate Alaska moving reviews, and so much more, right here on Moving Authority.

Make sure that you secure free moving estimates for everything on your list. This means more than the costs to move your furniture; look into having the best car transport in Alaska. When choosing an American moving company, read through Alaska moving company reviews to find the best team. Choose between Alaska long distance movers, self-service movers, and local movers to get the job done. Take a look at a moving cost estimate free of charge right here on Moving Authority.



Secret Ways to Save on Your Next Move

  • Don’t spend money on moving boxes! Free boxes can generally be acquired easily from local businesses.
  • Dodge extra fees by packing your moving boxes yourself.
  • If you aren't transporting a lot of items, consider renting a cargo van instead of a full-service moving truck.
  • Decrease the distance your movers need to travel from the moving space to the truck (and vice versa), if possible (surprise: that costs extra!)
  • Sell your unwanted stuff either in a yard sale or online through avenues like Craigslist or eBay.

How Soon Is Too Soon? When To Book Your Move, According to Experts

  • It’s never too soon to get down to business with planning your move.
  • When you know that you’re moving and you know your new address, begin researching moving companies.
  • Once you find a moving company you like, make sure that it fits your budget and has been reviewed well by previous customers.
  • You will probably find that you have a lot more stuff than you realize, so starting early is the best way to combat stress about getting everything you own from its origin to the destination.
  • For long-distance moves, it’s recommended to get started planning and packing at least two months in advance.
  • If you’re staying local, one month of planning time is a good idea.
  • Be wary of the cheapest options for moving companies. It may be tempting to want to go with these companies offering outrageously low prices, because who doesn’t like saving money? However, if a price seems too good to be true, there’s probably a reason. Most often, this reason is that the moving company is a rogue mover who will want to scam you.
  • Investing in durable packing materials is a must, however, it doesn’t always mean you have to pay an arm and a leg. Bars and liquor stores are unexpectedly awesome resources for moving boxes since the bottles of alcohol are shipped without breaking. These boxes are ideal for your fragile items, and normally just end up broken down in a dumpster after use! Ask politely, and most likely, you shall receive.





Where to Warm Up And Fill Up In The Bitter Chill of Alaska

  • Moose’s Tooth Pub & Pizzeria, Anchorage
  • Henry’s Great Alaskan Restaurant, Kodiak
  • Double Musky Inn, Girdwood
  • Lavelle’s Bistro, Fairbanks
  • Red Dog Saloon, Juneau


Aurora in Alaska: Everything You Need To Know About This Natural Phenomenon

  • Aurora Borealis, (most commonly called the Northern Lights), can be seen in the fall and winter months in the sky.
  • This green and blue ribbon of dancing light happens when solar energy is trapped in the openings of the Earth’s electromagnetic field.
  • The lights can be seen most vibrantly in northern locations of the planet above the Arctic Circle
  • The most popular place in Alaska to see the aurora borealis is Anchorage, though it can be seen from several different spots in the state.




Do you know?

Do you know quotes

Within the world of transportation, bypass routes are often very controversial. This is mostly due to the fact that they require the building of a road carrying heavy traffic where no road existed before. This has created conflict among society thus creating a divergence between those in support of bypasses and those who are opposed. Supporters believe they reduce congestion in built up areas. Those in opposition do not believe in developing (often rural) undeveloped land. In addition, the cities that are bypassed may also oppose such a project as reduced traffic may, in turn, reduce and damage business.

In American English, the word "truck" has historically been preceded by a word describing the type of vehicle, such as a "tanker truck". In British English, preference would lie with "tanker" or "petrol tanker".

Prior to the 20th century, freight was generally transported overland via trains and railroads. During this time, trains were essential, and they were highly efficient at moving large amounts of freight. But, they could only deliver that freight to urban centers for distribution by horse-drawn transport. Though there were several trucks throughout this time, they were used more as space for advertising that for actual utility. At this time, the use of range for trucks was quite challenging. The use of electric engines, lack of paved rural roads, and small load capacities limited trucks to most short-haul urban routes.

In 2009, the book 'Trucking Country: The Road to America's Walmart Economy' debuted, written by author Shane Hamilton. This novel explores the interesting history of trucking and connects certain developments. Particularly how such development in the trucking industry have helped the so-called big-box stored. Examples of these would include Walmart or Target, they dominate the retail sector of the U.S. economy. Yet, Hamilton connects historical and present-day evidence that connects such correlations.

Trucks and cars have much in common mechanically as well as ancestrally. One link between them is the steam-powered fardier Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot, who built it in 1769. Unfortunately for him, steam trucks were not really common until the mid 1800's. While looking at this practically, it would be much harder to have a steam truck. This is mostly due to the fact that the roads of the time were built for horse and carriages. Steam trucks were left to very short hauls, usually from a factory to the nearest railway station. In 1881, the first semi-trailer appeared, and it was in fact towed by a steam tractor manufactured by De Dion-Bouton. Steam-powered trucks were sold in France and in the United States, apparently until the eve of World War I. Also, at the beginning of World War II in the United Kingdom, they were known as 'steam wagons'.

The number one hit on the Billboard chart in 1976 was quite controversial for the trucking industry. "Convoy," is a song about a group of reckless truck drivers bent on evading laws such as toll booths and speed traps. The song went on to inspire the film "Convoy", featuring defiant Kris Kristofferson screaming "piss on your law!" After the film's release, thousands of independent truck drivers went on strike. The participated in violent protests during the 1979 energy crisis. However, similar strikes had occurred during the 1973 energy crisis.

The year 1611 marked an important time for trucks, as that is when the word originated. The usage of "truck" referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. Further extending its usage in 1771, it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads. In 1916 it became shortened, calling it a "motor truck". While since the 1930's its expanded application goes as far as to say "motor-powered load carrier".

The United States' Interstate Highway System is full of bypasses and loops with the designation of a three-digit number. Usually beginning with an even digit, it is important to note that this pattern is highly inconsistent. For example, in Des Moines, Iowa the genuine bypass is the main route. More specifically, it is Interstate 35 and Interstate 80, with the loop into downtown Des Moines being Interstate 235. As it is illustrated in this example, they do not always consistently begin with an even number. However, the 'correct' designation is exemplified in Omaha, Nebraska. In Omaha, Interstate 480 traverses the downtown area, which is bypassed by Interstate 80, Interstate 680, and Interstate 95. Interstate 95 then in turn goes through Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Furthermore, Interstate 295 is the bypass around Philadelphia, which leads into New Jersey. Although this can all be rather confusing, it is most important to understand the Interstate Highway System and the role bypasses play.

Compliance, Safety, and Accountability (CSA) are fundamental to the FMCSA's compliance program. The purpose of the CSA program is to oversee and focus on motor carriers' safety performance. To enforce such safety regulations, the CSA conducts roadside inspections and crash investigations. The program issues violations when instances of noncompliance with CSA safety regulations are exposed.   Unfortunately, the CSA's number of safety investigation teams and state law enforcement partners are rather small in comparison to the millions of CMV companies and commercial driver license (CDL) holders. A key factor in the CSA program is known as the Safety Measurement System (SMS). This system relies on data analysis to identify unsafe companies to arrange them for safety interventions. SMS is incredibly helpful to CSA in finding and holding companies accountable for safety performance.  

In 1893, the Office of Road Inquiry (ORI) was established as an organization. However, in 1905 the name was changed to the Office Public Records (OPR). The organization then went on to become a division of the United States Department of Agriculture. As seen throughout history, organizations seem incapable of maintaining permanent names. So, the organization's name was changed three more times, first in 1915 to the Bureau of Public Roads and again in 1939 to the Public Roads Administration (PRA). Yet again, the name was later shifted to the Federal Works Agency, although it was abolished in 1949. Finally, in 1949, the name reverted to the Bureau of Public Roads, falling under the Department of Commerce. With so many name changes, it can be difficult to keep up to date with such organizations. This is why it is most important to research and educate yourself on such matters.

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a division of the USDOT specializing in highway transportation. The agency's major influential activities are generally separated into two different "programs". The first is the Federal-aid Highway Program. This provides financial aid to support the construction, maintenance, and operation of the U.S. highway network. The second program, the Federal Lands Highway Program, shares a similar name with different intentions. The purpose of this program is to improve transportation involving Federal and Tribal lands. They also focus on preserving "national treasures" for the historic and beatific enjoyment for all.

The USDOT (USDOT or DOT) is considered a federal Cabinet department within the U.S. government. Clearly, this department concerns itself with all aspects of transportation with safety as a focal point. The DOT was officially established by an act of Congress on October 15, 1966, beginning its operation on April 1, 1967. Superior to the DOT, the United States Secretary of Transportation governs the department. The mission of the DOT is to "Serve the United States by ensuring a fast, safe, efficient, accessible, and convenient transportation system that meets our vital national interests and enhances the quality of life for the American people, today and into the future." Essentially this states how important it is to improve all types of transportation as a way to enhance both safety and life in general etc. It is important to note that the DOT is not in place to hurt businesses, but to improve our "vital national interests" and our "quality of life". The transportation networks are in definite need of such fundamental attention. Federal departments such as the USDOT are key to this industry by creating and enforcing regulations with intentions to increase the efficiency and safety of transportation. 

The concept of a bypass is a simple one. It is a road or highway that purposely avoids or "bypasses" a built-up area, town, or village. Bypasses were created with the intent to let through traffic flow without having to get stuck in local traffic. In general they are supposed to reduce congestion in a built-up area. By doing so, road safety will greatly improve.   A bypass designated for trucks traveling a long distance, either commercial or otherwise, is called a truck route.

The feature film "Joy Ride" premiered in 2001, portraying the story of two college-age brothers who by a CB radio while taking a road trip. Although the plot seems lighthearted, it takes a quick turn after one of the brothers attempts a prank on an unknown truck driver. They soon find out the dangerous intentions of this killer driver, who is set on getting his revenge. Seven years later in 2008 the sequel "Joy Ride 2: Dead Ahead" came out on DVD only. Similar to its predecessor, the plot involves another murdering truck driver, a.k.a "Rusty Nail". He essentially plays psychological mind games with a young couple on a road trip.

The year of 1977 marked the release of the infamous Smokey and the Bandit. It went on to be the third highest grossing film that year, following tough competitors like Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Burt Reynolds plays the protagonist, or "The Bandit", who escorts "The Snowman" in order to deliver bootleg beer. Reynolds once stated he envisioned trucking as a "hedonistic joyride entirely devoid from economic reality"   Another action film in 1977 also focused on truck drivers, as was the trend it seems. Breaker! Breaker! starring infamous Chuck Norris also focused on truck drivers. They were also displaying movie posters with the catch phrase "... he's got a CB radio and a hundred friends who just might get mad!"

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) conducted a series of tests. These tests were extensive field tests of roads and bridges to assess damages to the pavement. In particular they wanted to know how traffic contributes to the deterioration of pavement materials. These tests essentially led to the 1964 recommendation by AASHTO to Congress. The recommendation determined the gross weight limit for trucks to be determined by a bridge formula table. This includes table based on axle lengths, instead of a state upper limit. By the time 1970 came around, there were over 18 million truck on America's roads.

There many reasons for moving, each one with a unique and specific reason as to why. Relocation services, employee relocation, or workforce mobility can create a range of processes. This process of transferring employees, their families, and/or entire departments of a business to a new location can be difficult. Like some types of employee benefits, these matters are dealt with by human resources specialists within a corporation.

In today's society, there are rules and regulations everywhere you go, the same goes for commercial vehicles. The federal government has strict regulations that must be met, such as how many hours a driver may be on the clock. For example, 11 hours driving /14 hours on-duty followed by 10 hours off, with a max of 70 hours/8 days or 60 hours/7 days. They can also set rules deciding how much rest and sleep time is required, however, these are only a couple of regulations set. Any violations are often subject to harsh penalties. In some cases, there are instruments to track each driver's hours, which are becoming more necessary.

Many people are familiar with this type of moving, using truck rental services, or borrowing similar hardware, is known as DIY moving. Whoever is renting a truck or trailer large enough to carry their household goods may obtain moving equipment if necessary. Equipment may be items such as dollies, furniture pads, and cargo belts to protect furniture and to ease the moving process.

In the United States and Canada, the cost for long-distance moves is generally determined by a few factors. The first is the weight of the items to be moved and the distance it will go. Cost is also based on how quickly the items are to be moved, as well as the time of the year or month which the move occurs. In the United Kingdom and Australia, it's quite different. They base price on the volume of the items as opposed to their weight. Keep in mind some movers may offer flat rate pricing.

In 1976, the number one hit on the Billboard chart was "Convoy," a novelty song by C.W. McCall about a convoy of truck drivers evading speed traps and toll booths across America. The song inspired the 1978 action film Convoy directed by Sam Peckinpah. After the film's release, thousands of independent truck drivers went on strike and participated in violent protests during the 1979 energy crisis (although similar strikes had occurred during the 1973 energy crisis).

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 40 million United States citizens have moved annually over the last decade. Of those people who have moved in the United States, 84.5% of them have moved within their own state, 12.5% have moved to another state, and 2.3% have moved to another country.

Trucks of the era mostly used two-cylinder engines and had a carrying capacity of 1,500 to 2,000 kilograms (3,300 to 4,400 lb). In 1904, 700 heavy trucks were built in the United States, 1000 in 1907, 6000 in 1910, and 25000 in 1914. A Benz truck modified by Netphener company (1895)

During the latter part of the 20th century, we saw a decline of the trucking culture. Coinciding with this decline was a decline of the image of truck drivers, as they became negatively stigmatized. As a result of such negativity, it makes sense that truck drivers were frequently portrayed as the "bad guy(s)" in movies.

Signage of business routes varies, depending on the type of route they are derived from. Business routes paralleling U.S. and state highways usually have exactly the same shield shapes and nearly the same overall appearance as the routes they parallel, with a rectangular plate reading "BUSINESS" placed above the shield (either supplementing or replacing the directional plate, depending on the preference of the road agency). In order to better identify and differentiate alternate routes from the routes they parallel, some states such as Maryland are beginning to use green shields for business routes off U.S. highways. In addition, Maryland uses a green shield for business routes off state highways with the word "BUSINESS" in place of "MARYLAND" is used for a state route.

In the United States, the Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986 established minimum requirements that must be met when a state issues a commercial driver's license CDL. It specifies the following types of license: - Class A CDL drivers. Drive vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater, or any combination of vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater when towing a trailer weighing more than 10,000 pounds. Transports quantities of hazardous materials that require warning placards under Department of Public Safety regulations. - Class A Driver License permits. Is a step in preparation for Class A drivers to become a Commercial Driver. - Class B CDL driver. Class B is designed to transport 16 or more passengers (including driver) or more than 8 passengers (including the driver) for compensation. This includes, but is not limited to, tow trucks, tractor trailers, and buses.

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.   The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

The definition of business logistics can be difficult to understand. Logistics can be simply put as a means of management that plans, implements, and controls the efficiency of the business. The notion of business logistics incorporates all sectors of the industry. It is used as a means to manage the fruition of project life cycles, supply chains, and resultant efficiency.

As the American Interstate Highway System began to expand in the 1950's, the trucking industry began to take over a large market share. That is, a large share of the transportation of goods throughout the country. Before this era, trains had been relied on to transport the bulk of the goods cross country or state to state. The Interstate Highway System was influential as it allows for merchandise to travel door to door with ease. Since then, truckload carriers have taken advantage of the interstate system, especially when performing a long distance move. Typically, they bring the merchandise from one distribution center of the country to another part of the country. The increase in truckload freight transportation has reduced the time it takes to transport the goods. Whether the freight was manufactured or produced for the different areas internationally, the time it takes to transport goods has decreased dramatically.  

Implemented in 2014, the National Registry, requires all Medical Examiners (ME) who conduct physical examinations and issue medical certifications for interstate CMV drivers to complete training on FMCSA’s physical qualification standards, must pass a certification test. This is to demonstrate competence through periodic training and testing. CMV drivers whose medical certifications expire must use MEs on the National Registry for their examinations. FMCSA has reached its goal of at least 40,000 certified MEs signing onto the registry. All this means is that drivers or movers can now find certified medical examiners throughout the country who can perform their medical exam. FMCSA is preparing to issue a follow-on “National Registry 2” rule stating new requirements. In this case, MEs are to submit medical certificate information on a daily basis. These daily updates are sent to the FMCSA, which will then be sent to the states electronically. This process will dramatically decrease the chance of drivers falsifying medical cards.

The Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways is most commonly known as the Interstate Highway System, Interstate Freeway System, Interstate System, or simply the Interstate. It is a network of controlled-access highways that forms a part of the National Highway System of the United States. Named after President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who endorsed its formation, the idea was to have portable moving and storage. Construction was authorized by the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956. The original portion was completed 35 years later, although some urban routes were canceled and never built. The network has since been extended and, as of 2013, it had a total length of 47,856 miles (77,017 km), making it the world's second longest after China's. As of 2013, about one-quarter of all vehicle miles driven in the country use the Interstate system. In 2006, the cost of construction had been estimated at about $425 billion (equivalent to $511 billion in 2015).

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) issues Hours of Service regulations. At the same time, they govern the working hours of anyone operating a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in the United States. Such regulations apply to truck drivers, commercial and city bus drivers, and school bus drivers who operate CMVs. With these rules in place, the number of daily and weekly hours spent driving and working is limited. The FMCSA regulates the minimum amount of time drivers must spend resting between driving shifts. In regards to intrastate commerce, the respective state's regulations apply.

Relocation, or moving, is the process of vacating a fixed location, such as a residence or business, and settling in a different one. A move might be to a nearby location such as in the same neighborhood or a much farther location in a different city or even a different country. Moving usually includes packing up all belongings, transferring them to the new location, and unpacking them. It will also be necessary to update administrative information. This includes tasks such as notifying the post office, changing registration data, change of insurance, services etc. It is important to remember this step in the relocation process. 

The USDOT (USDOT or DOT) is considered a federal Cabinet department within the U.S. government. Clearly, this department concerns itself with all aspects of transportation with safety as a focal point. The DOT was officially established by an act of Congress on October 15, 1966, beginning its operation on April 1, 1967. Superior to the DOT, the United States Secretary of Transportation governs the department. The mission of the DOT is to "Serve the United States by ensuring a fast, safe, efficient, accessible, and convenient transportation system that meets our vital national interests and enhances the quality of life for the American people, today and into the future." Essentially this states how important it is to improve all types of transportation as a way to enhance both safety and life in general etc. It is important to note that the DOT is not in place to hurt businesses, but to improve our "vital national interests" and our "quality of life". The transportation networks are in definite need of such fundamental attention. Federal departments such as the USDOT are key to this industry by creating and enforcing regulations with intentions to increase the efficiency and safety of transportation. 

Unfortunately for the trucking industry, their image began to crumble during the latter part of the 20th century. As a result, their reputation suffered. More recently truckers have been portrayed as chauvinists or even worse, serial killers. The portrayals of semi-trailer trucks have focused on stories of the trucks becoming self-aware. Generally, this is with some extraterrestrial help.

Light trucks are classified this way because they are car-sized, yet in the U.S. they can be no more than 6,300 kg (13,900 lb). These are used by not only used by individuals but also businesses as well. In the UK they may not weigh more than 3,500 kg (7,700 lb) and are authorized to drive with a driving license for cars. Pickup trucks, popular in North America, are most seen in North America and some regions of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Although Europe doesn't seem to follow this trend, where the size of the commercial vehicle is most often made as vans.