Tariff with Contracts

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Product Code: 8

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Product Description:

  • Receive Published Tariff & 26 Forms/contracts.
  • You get a 1 to 2 hour consultation with Tariff
  • A Moving tariff is regulation by Federal Government requires

Tariffs and Contracts



Welcome to the world of moving tariffs and contracts. Both of which are crucial to the success of moving companies. In fact, having high-quality published tariffs and contracts benefit more than carrier organizations. They also benefit customers. Why? The tariffs and contracts help ensure that customers are aware of what they’re paying for. Tariffs and contracts are the glue that keeps the client-company relationship flourishing. So, are you ready to learn about moving tariffs and contracts? Let’s get started.



What Are Moving Tariffs and Contracts?



Tariffs and contracts are crucial documents within the moving industry. The tariffs get provided to customers by their respective moving companies. The tariff/contract serves as an outline of all rates and potential charges. A tariff/contract also points out the terms of service. This is very important for customers. In fact, all customers should understand the terms of service before a move takes place. Here is an example. Say that there is a chance a customer might have to cancel a move. The moving contract should provide the customer with an official cancellation policy. Plus, it should also state extra service where extra fees will apply. The length of moving tariffs and contracts varies depending on the company. Sometimes a tariff is only a single page. But sometimes it’s more than a dozen pages. The length depends on the circumstances of each move. 

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has made one thing very clear. It demands every interstate moving company must have the ability to provide tariffs. As soon as a customer requests a mover’s tariff, a company has a legal obligation to deliver it. In fact, the moving and storage industry has many regulations. You're welcome to contact our organization if you ever have questions about regulations. When it comes to rate negotiation tactics, that’s up to each moving company. Every company has its own rate negotiation policy. Once a rate gets agreed-upon, that rate becomes official through the moving contract. Keep in mind that the moving and storage industry is very competitive. That’s why most companies are willing to adjust their prices for their customers. Rate negotiation is crucial when it comes to running a successful moving company. The rate changes are never guaranteed upfront. They only are once the draft of a tariff and contract gets finalized.



How Do Moving Companies Create Their Tariffs and Contracts?


Keep in mind that the terms “tariff” and “contract” often refer to the same document. After all, moving tariffs serve as legal contracts. The contracts give each customer a full breakdown of a moving organization’s fees. Plus, contracts also illustrate all relevant rules and regulations. In the past, a lot of companies have turned to attorneys to help them with tariffs and contracts. Why? To make sure that each tariff/contract complies with 100% legal conditions. But more and more companies are now turning to third-party tariff building services. Tariff building organizations (like ours) specialize in building high-quality tariffs. They know how to ensure a company’s customers have clarified outlines. This is so all customers know what to expect before each move. Sure, there are some standard moving tariff templates that companies can use. But each tariff is unique and based on the circumstances of specific moves. 



Moving Companies Can Avoid Legal Trouble Through Quality Tariffs and Contracts 



Published tariffs and contracts should always appear unique. Companies can't operate in a collective manner with other companies using similar tariffs. This process has a name: collective rate-marking/collective tariff-making. When this happens, a moving company can face very severe fines. This refers to anti-trust prosecution that the Department of Justice conducts. So, what’s the best way for a moving company to avoid anti-trust prosecution? It’s to have custom tariffs get published on a regular basis by a third party. But getting custom tariffs published isn’t only about adhering to the law. It’s also about providing customers with better selections and choices. After all, seeing competitive rates is a huge incentive for customers. It makes them want to book with moving companies. Third party tariff publishers ensure that those rates are obvious to prospective customers. Please contact us today for more information about how to create and publish tariffs.



Why Are Mover’s Tariffs and Contracts So Important?



Many people assume that tariffs and contracts are only important for moving companies. But that’s not the case. Yes, interstate movers need quality tariffs and contracts. Why? So that they can remain in good standing with the law. But the consumer also needs well-written tariffs and contracts. In fact, the documents have tons of uses for customers. What is the number one benefit of tariffs and contracts? It’s that they prevent surprises from taking place. They position customers to understand everything that they need to. Once this happens, it’s more likely that moving days will go well without any road bumps. Plus, reading a tariff/contract positions people to ask questions ahead of time. This will prevent a company’s workers from having to juggle many things during a move.

Customers are encouraged to ask for tariffs if their moving companies do not offer them. That’s why each company must get prepared to provide tariffs before all moves take place. The tariff/contract is crucial. It provides people with complete breakdowns of important information. After all, customers should know what specific services they are paying for. And providing tariffs and contracts is a company’s main resource for making that happen. Moving companies need to work fast to write their tariffs and contracts. Otherwise, impatient customers will decide to hire other companies. This is another reason why third-party tariff builders are so important. They can create tariffs and contracts faster than most moving and storage companies. 

The more transparent the contract is, the greater the chance of a successful move. Customers should get encouraged to read their contracts word-for-word. If not, then they will ask moving employees plenty of questions. You can encourage people to take their time reading the contracts. Telling them that some agreed-upon services/rates can get modified is also important. This is an issue that causes a lot of confusion for many customers. The last thing you want to deal with is a customer that claims there is an unexpected charge. Transparent tariffs and contracts will prevent that situation from taking place. Plus, all rates and policies will appear obvious on the tariffs and contracts.



Standard Charges That Tariffs and Contracts Cover



Moving tariffs and contracts serve a key purpose: they break down rates and charges. This applies to much more than the entire rate of a move. It also applies to many other common relocation charges. So, let’s go over some standard items that tariffs and contracts cover. 

Packing costs are often included in the tariffs and charges. This applies to both full-service packing and on the fly packing. Sometimes customers forget to pack certain items and movers must pack at a moment’s notice. It’s important that all packing services get listed on tariffs and contracts. Supply costs are another crucial contract item. Certain moving organizations charge extra fees for using specific supplies. For example, providing extra boxes could count as a unique charge. Or, providing extra packing materials could serve as a supply cost. It’s important that a contract includes every single supply cost that a company provides. The same concept applies toward insurance costs. A quality contract/tariff should outline all charges related to various insurance plans. These are plans that moving companies provide to customers. 

Moving conditions are another item that belong in tariffs and contracts. For example, say a company’s movers have to walk up and down stairs. Or, say that there’s something else that makes their job difficult during a move. The extra charge for any type of moving condition should get listed in the contract or tariff. A condition is any concept that makes it hard for movers to transfer belongings out of a location. Storage is another key term here. Some customers will opt to store their goods with a company during the move. If this is the case for your organization, then you need to feature storage costs in your tariffs. The tariff should define the terms of storage and state how much the service costs. Another common contract/tariff item is the long carry fee. This applies when movers cannot park a truck near a pick-up/drop-off location. This means that the workers have to walk a certain distance to load or unload.  The specific distances and charges should go in your tariffs and contracts.



Conclusion: Using Quality Tariffs and Contracts Will Make a Big Difference



Tariffs and contracts matter. They are the lifeblood of moving and storage companies. Without using quality tariffs/contracts, companies risk getting fined into nonexistence. Plus, customers appreciate when all rates and charges appear organized and clear. Also, moving company workers function better when contracts and tariffs are in order. The key is for companies to build their tariffs and contracts through third parties. And that’s where our organization comes into play. We help companies of all shapes and sizes create fast, high-quality moving tariffs. Our staff also assists clients with creating bill of ladings and change of orders. In fact, there is no moving concept that our experts cannot assist with. Our team can even create bulk article price lists. They also compose post orders for services, and additional price lists. Our experts focus on improving the household goods inventory processes of moving companies. So, what are you waiting for? Please give us a call right now for help with tariffs and contracts. We look forward to helping your company thrive for years to come.

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Did You Know

Question In American English, the word "truck" has historically been preceded by a word describing the type of vehicle, such as a "tanker truck". In British English, preference would lie with "tanker" or "petrol tanker".

Question Receiving nation attention during the 1960's and 70's, songs and movies about truck driving were major hits. Finding solidarity, truck drivers participated in widespread strikes. Truck drivers from all over opposed the rising cost of fuel. Not to mention this is during the energy crises of 1873 and 1979. In 1980 the Motor Carrier Act drastically deregulated the trucking industry. Since then trucking has come to dominate the freight industry in the latter part of the 20th century. This coincided with what are now known as 'big-box' stores such as Target or Wal-Mart.

Question A commercial driver's license (CDL) is a driver's license required to operate large or heavy vehicles.

Question In 2009, the book 'Trucking Country: The Road to America's Walmart Economy' debuted, written by author Shane Hamilton. This novel explores the interesting history of trucking and connects certain developments. Particularly how such development in the trucking industry have helped the so-called big-box stored. Examples of these would include Walmart or Target, they dominate the retail sector of the U.S. economy. Yet, Hamilton connects historical and present-day evidence that connects such correlations.

Question Many modern trucks are powered by diesel engines, although small to medium size trucks with gas engines exist in the United States. The European Union rules that vehicles with a gross combination of mass up to 3,500 kg (7,716 lb) are also known as light commercial vehicles. Any vehicles exceeding that weight are known as large goods vehicles.

Question In the United States, a commercial driver's license is required to drive any type of commercial vehicle weighing 26,001 lb (11,794 kg) or more. In 2006 the US trucking industry employed 1.8 million drivers of heavy trucks.

Question In 1978 Sylvester Stallone starred in the film "F.I.S.T.". The story is loosely based on the 'Teamsters Union'. This union is a labor union which includes truck drivers as well as its then president, Jimmy Hoffa.

Question The Federal Bridge Law handles relations between the gross weight of the truck, the number of axles, and the spacing between them. This is how they determine is the truck can be on the Interstate Highway system. Each state gets to decide the maximum, under the Federal Bridge Law. They determine by vehicle in combination with axle weight on state and local roads

Question The interstate moving industry in the United States maintains regulation by the FMCSA, which is part of the USDOT. With only a small staff (fewer than 20 people) available to patrol hundreds of moving companies, enforcement is difficult. As a result of such a small staff, there are in many cases, no regulations that qualify moving companies as 'reliable'. Without this guarantee, it is difficult to a consumer to make a choice. Although, moving companies can provide and often display a DOT license.

Question In some states, a business route is designated by adding the letter "B" after the number instead of placing a "Business" sign above it. For example, Arkansas signs US business route 71 as "US 71B". On some route shields and road signs, the word "business" is shortened to just "BUS". This abbreviation is rare and usually avoided to prevent confusion with bus routes.

Question In the United States, the Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986 established minimum requirements that must be met when a state issues a commercial driver's license CDL. It specifies the following types of license: - Class A CDL drivers. Drive vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater, or any combination of vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater when towing a trailer weighing more than 10,000 pounds. Transports quantities of hazardous materials that require warning placards under Department of Public Safety regulations. - Class A Driver License permits. Is a step in preparation for Class A drivers to become a Commercial Driver. - Class B CDL driver. Class B is designed to transport 16 or more passengers (including driver) or more than 8 passengers (including the driver) for compensation. This includes, but is not limited to, tow trucks, tractor trailers, and buses.

Question The feature film "Joy Ride" premiered in 2001, portraying the story of two college-age brothers who by a CB radio while taking a road trip. Although the plot seems lighthearted, it takes a quick turn after one of the brothers attempts a prank on an unknown truck driver. They soon find out the dangerous intentions of this killer driver, who is set on getting his revenge. Seven years later in 2008 the sequel "Joy Ride 2: Dead Ahead" came out on DVD only. Similar to its predecessor, the plot involves another murdering truck driver, a.k.a "Rusty Nail". He essentially plays psychological mind games with a young couple on a road trip.

Question Released in 1998, the film Black Dog featured Patrick Swayze as a truck driver who made it out of prison. However, his life of crime continued, as he was manipulated into the transportation of illegal guns. Writer Scott Doviak has described the movie as a "high-octane riff on White Line Fever" as well as "a throwback to the trucker movies of the 70s".

Question The 1950's were quite different than the years to come. They were more likely to be considered "Knights of the Road", if you will, for helping stranded travelers. In these times truck drivers were envied and were viewed as an opposition to the book "The Organization Man". Bestseller in 1956, author William H. Whyte's novel describes "the man in the gray flannel suit", who sat in an office every day. He's describing a typical office style job that is very structured with managers watching over everyone. Truck drivers represented the opposite of all these concepts. Popular trucking songs glorified the life of drivers as independent "wanderers". Yet, there were attempts to bring back the factory style efficiency, such as using tachnographs. Although most attempts resulted in little success. Drivers routinely sabotaged and discovered new ways to falsify the machine's records.

Question With the onset of trucking culture, truck drivers often became portrayed as protagonists in popular media. Author Shane Hamilton, who wrote "Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy", focuses on truck driving. He explores the history of trucking and while connecting it development in the trucking industry. It is important to note, as Hamilton discusses the trucking industry and how it helps the so-called big-box stores dominate the U.S. marketplace. Hamilton certainly takes an interesting perspective historically speaking.

Question The Federal-Aid Highway Amendments of 1974 established a federal maximum gross vehicle weight of 80,000 pounds (36,000 kg). It also introduced a sliding scale of truck weight-to-length ratios based on the bridge formula. Although, they did not establish a federal minimum weight limit. By failing to establish a federal regulation, six contiguous in the Mississippi Valley rebelled. Becoming known as the "barrier state", they refused to increase their Interstate weight limits to 80,000 pounds. Due to this, the trucking industry faced a barrier to efficient cross-country interstate commerce.

Question In 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.

Question Heavy trucks. A cement mixer is an example of Class 8 heavy trucks. Heavy trucks are the largest on-road trucks, Class 8. These include vocational applications such as heavy dump trucks, concrete pump trucks, and refuse hauling, as well as ubiquitous long-haul 6×4 and 4x2 tractor units. Road damage and wear increase very rapidly with the axle weight. The axle weight is the truck weight divided by the number of axles, but the actual axle weight depends on the position of the load over the axles. The number of steering axles and the suspension type also influence the amount of the road wear. In many countries with good roads, a six-axle truck may have a maximum weight over 50 tons (49 long tons; 55 short tons).