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204 Movers in Kentucky

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LAST REVIEW

25 5 1 Reviewed 25 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - John Smith

“Testing claim, https://www.movingauthority.com/...”

“Testing claim, https://www.movingauthority.com/claim-details/?id=GT2R4W”

United States Kentucky

LAST REVIEW

10 5 1 Reviewed 10 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Ann W Hines

“Sal Russo and Joe Pryor moved our household las...”

“Sal Russo and Joe Pryor moved our household last Sunday, 2/28. They were professional, polite and friendly. The wor...”

United States Kentucky

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9 5 1 Reviewed 9 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Ethan Lambert

“DO NOT USE THIS "COMPANY." Repeated for emp...”

“DO NOT USE THIS "COMPANY." Repeated for emphasis: DO NOT USE THIS COMPANY! Seriously. You will not be satisfied w...”

United States Kentucky

LAST REVIEW

6 5 1 Reviewed 6 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Charlene

“I highly recommend montes movers.we had a great...”

“I highly recommend montes movers.we had a great exsperince with jason and his crew very hard workers and fast and gre...”

United States Kentucky

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5 5 1 Reviewed 5 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Sharon C. /Amy K

“I simply can not say enough great things about ...”

“I simply can not say enough great things about Michael Ball Moving and Storage! This move was at the end of a long ...”

United States Kentucky

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5 5 1 Reviewed 5 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Victorian Martin-Offner

“1. Truck damaged my mail box and my neighbors ...”

“1. Truck damaged my mail box and my neighbors yard upon arrival. 2. They would not load my grill even though the p...”

United States Kentucky

LAST REVIEW

4 5 1 Reviewed 4 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Gregory Ward

“I recently had to pack up and move from San Fra...”

“I recently had to pack up and move from San Francisco to Denver for a new job opportunity. I looked for a moving com...”

United States Kentucky

LAST REVIEW

4 5 1 Reviewed 4 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Laura Branchini

“Umbrella Movers did a great job. Mark and Edwar...”

“Umbrella Movers did a great job. Mark and Edward were fast and professional. I would recommend them to anyone. All of...”

United States Kentucky

LAST REVIEW

4 5 1 Reviewed 4 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Amanda Torres

“This is the WORST company ever! They overcharg...”

“This is the WORST company ever! They overcharged my mother by $250, and now they won't return any of our calls! Avo...”

United States Kentucky

LAST REVIEW

4 5 1 Reviewed 4 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Ben Jacobs

“Did miss a couple of items left behind in a clo...”

“Did miss a couple of items left behind in a closet. Could have done a better job of covering floors - especially betw...”

United States Kentucky

LAST REVIEW

4 5 1 Reviewed 4 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Wendy A.

“For those earlier pictures with damages on the ...”

“For those earlier pictures with damages on the boxes. I share your sentiment and I am sorry this happen to your boxes...”

United States Kentucky

LAST REVIEW

4 5 1 Reviewed 4 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - P. Rogers

“Arrow was very professional and reliable for ou...”

“Arrow was very professional and reliable for our move. They went out of their way to accommodate us and for storage, ...”

United States Kentucky

LAST REVIEW

4 5 1 Reviewed 4 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Valerie Thomas

“I used this company in May 2021 to move from le...”

“I used this company in May 2021 to move from lexington ky to Richmond ky the words experience ever.The movers broke t...”

United States Kentucky

LAST REVIEW

3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - David D

“These folks were incredible! Clean cut and expe...”

“These folks were incredible! Clean cut and expert. I'd prescribe them to anybody. The proprietor Joe halted out at my...”

United States Kentucky

LAST REVIEW

3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Christin D

“The guys who came to move we were great. Fun pe...”

“The guys who came to move we were great. Fun personalities, helpful and kind. That's about all the good I can say abo...”

United States Kentucky

Hacks To Get Great Kentucky Moving Companies

Relocation is intensive, but it doesn't have to be. When you get a free moving quote, you're outlining your Kentucky movers cost estimate. This information can open your eyes to discount relocation rates, moving tips, and the best Kentucky priced movers.

A moving cost estimate is your key to finding the right American moving company. You may want the best car transport in Kentucky, or a team of self-service movers to move your furniture. At Moving Authority, we have a goal to provide extensive Kentucky moving company reviews, free moving estimates, and so much more. Find your Kentucky long distance movers or local movers here and watch how easy your move can be.

Prepared To Move? Do This Stuff First.


4 Natural Gems You Can’t Leave Kentucky Without Exploring

  • The Yahoo Arch in Daniel Boone National Forest
  • Mammoth Onyx Cave in Horse Caves
  • Blue Pool in Lost River Cave
  • Natural Bridge State Resort Park



How to Move to Kentucky Like an Expert

  • Check moving company ratings on Moving Authority.
  • Get rid of all unwanted personal belongings.
  • Read up on proper packing techniques.
  • Opt for affordable prices rather than cheap. Renting a Kentucky moving van and making a DIY move seems cost-efficient, but you could get so much more with a full-service mover.
  • Make sure you or your moving company has the right moving equipment to get the job done.



4 Uncommon Hacks For Packing Clothes

  • Don’t use boxes! Instead, you can use bags. If you can, try a vacuum-sealed bag, so that your clothes will be as compact as possible.
  • Organize by the time of year. Be sure not to mix bathing suits with ski gear in efforts to save space. It will be more of a hassle after you move in and begin to unpack!
  • Take a look at which clothes you never wear and use this as an opportunity to minimize your excess. Charities like Goodwill, churches, and thrift stores are always on the lookout for extra clothes.
  • Use all the space available in a box! You can stuff holes between the clothes and the box with belts, socks, and other clothing accessories.
  • Should you leave clothes in your dresser drawers? Yes and no. Keep the clothes in the drawers, but take the drawers out of the dresser. This way, the dresser itself is lighter to carry, and you can use less moving boxes.

Do you know?

Do you know quotes

A business route (occasionally city route) in the United States and Canada is a short special route connected to a parent numbered highway at its beginning, then routed through the central business district of a nearby city or town, and finally reconnecting with the same parent numbered highway again at its end.

Trucks and cars have much in common mechanically as well as ancestrally. One link between them is the steam-powered fardier Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot, who built it in 1769. Unfortunately for him, steam trucks were not really common until the mid 1800's. While looking at this practically, it would be much harder to have a steam truck. This is mostly due to the fact that the roads of the time were built for horse and carriages. Steam trucks were left to very short hauls, usually from a factory to the nearest railway station. In 1881, the first semi-trailer appeared, and it was in fact towed by a steam tractor manufactured by De Dion-Bouton. Steam-powered trucks were sold in France and in the United States, apparently until the eve of World War I. Also, at the beginning of World War II in the United Kingdom, they were known as 'steam wagons'.

Medium trucks are larger than light but smaller than heavy trucks. In the US, they are defined as weighing between 13,000 and 33,000 pounds (6,000 and 15,000 kg). For the UK and the EU, the weight is between 3.5 and 7.5 tons (3.9 and 8.3 tons). Local delivery and public service (dump trucks, garbage trucks, and fire-fighting trucks) are around this size.

The interstate moving industry in the United States maintains regulation by the FMCSA, which is part of the USDOT. With only a small staff (fewer than 20 people) available to patrol hundreds of moving companies, enforcement is difficult. As a result of such a small staff, there are in many cases, no regulations that qualify moving companies as 'reliable'. Without this guarantee, it is difficult to a consumer to make a choice. Although, moving companies can provide and often display a DOT license.

Without strong land use controls, buildings are too often built in town right along a bypass. This results with the conversion of it into an ordinary town road, resulting in the bypass becoming as congested as the local streets. On the contrary, a bypass is intended to avoid such local street congestion. Gas stations, shopping centers, along with various other businesses are often built alongside them. They are built in hopes of easing accessibility, while home are ideally avoided for noise reasons.

In the United States, commercial truck classification is fixed by each vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8. Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks. Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS, formerly known as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

The Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula is a mathematical formula used in the United States to determine the appropriate gross weight for a long distance moving vehicle, based on the axle number and spacing. Enforced by the Department of Transportation upon long-haul truck drivers, it is used as a means of preventing heavy vehicles from damaging roads and bridges. This is especially in particular to the total weight of a loaded truck, whether being used for commercial moving services or for long distance moving services in general.   According to the Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula, the total weight of a loaded truck (tractor and trailer, 5-axle rig) cannot exceed 80,000 lbs in the United States. Under ordinary circumstances, long-haul equipment trucks will weight about 15,000 kg (33,069 lbs). This leaves about 20,000 kg (44,092 lbs) of freight capacity. Likewise, a load is limited to the space available in the trailer, normally with dimensions of 48 ft (14.63 m) or 53 ft (16.15 m) long, 2.6 m (102.4 in) wide, 2.7 m (8 ft 10.3 in) high and 13 ft 6 in or 4.11 m high.

A properly fitted close-coupled trailer is fitted with a rigid tow bar. It then projects from its front and hooks onto a hook on the tractor. It is important to not that it does not pivot as a draw bar does.

The term "lorry" has an ambiguous origin, but it is likely that its roots were in the rail transport industry. This is where the word is known to have been used in 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage) specifically a large flat wagon. It may derive from the verb lurry, which means to pull or tug, of uncertain origin. It's expanded meaning was much more exciting as "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods", and has been in usage since 1911. Previously, unbeknownst to most, the word "lorry" was used for a fashion of big horse-drawn goods wagon.

Relocation, or moving, is the process of vacating a fixed location, such as a residence or business, and settling in a different one. A move might be to a nearby location such as in the same neighborhood or a much farther location in a different city or even a different country. Moving usually includes packing up all belongings, transferring them to the new location, and unpacking them. It will also be necessary to update administrative information. This includes tasks such as notifying the post office, changing registration data, change of insurance, services etc. It is important to remember this step in the relocation process. 

Throughout the United States, bypass routes are a special type of route most commonly used on an alternative routing of a highway around a town. Specifically when the main route of the highway goes through the town. Originally, these routes were designated as "truck routes" as a means to divert trucking traffic away from towns. However, this name was later changed by AASHTO in 1959 to what we now call a "bypass". Many "truck routes" continue to remain regardless that the mainline of the highway prohibits trucks.

With the onset of trucking culture, truck drivers often became portrayed as protagonists in popular media. Author Shane Hamilton, who wrote "Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy", focuses on truck driving. He explores the history of trucking and while connecting it development in the trucking industry. It is important to note, as Hamilton discusses the trucking industry and how it helps the so-called big-box stores dominate the U.S. marketplace. Hamilton certainly takes an interesting perspective historically speaking.

Unfortunately for the trucking industry, their image began to crumble during the latter part of the 20th century. As a result, their reputation suffered. More recently truckers have been portrayed as chauvinists or even worse, serial killers. The portrayals of semi-trailer trucks have focused on stories of the trucks becoming self-aware. Generally, this is with some extraterrestrial help.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) conducted a series of tests. These tests were extensive field tests of roads and bridges to assess damages to the pavement. In particular they wanted to know how traffic contributes to the deterioration of pavement materials. These tests essentially led to the 1964 recommendation by AASHTO to Congress. The recommendation determined the gross weight limit for trucks to be determined by a bridge formula table. This includes table based on axle lengths, instead of a state upper limit. By the time 1970 came around, there were over 18 million truck on America's roads.

In 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.

The industry intends to both consumers as well as moving companies, this is why there are Ministers of Transportation in the industry. They are there to set and maintain laws and regulations in place to create a safer environment. It offers its members professional service training and states the time that movers have been in existence. It also provides them with federal government representation and statistical industry reporting. Additionally, there are arbitration services for lost or damaged claims, publications, public relations, and annual tariff updates and awards. This site includes articles as well that give some direction, a quarterly data summary, and industry trends.

Driver's licensing has coincided throughout the European Union in order to for the complex rules to all member states. Driving a vehicle weighing more than 7.5 tons (16,535 lb) for commercial purposes requires a certain license. This specialist licence type varies depending on the use of the vehicle and number of seat. Licences first acquired after 1997, the weight was reduced to 3,500 kilograms (7,716 lb), not including trailers.

Tracing the origins of particular words can be quite different with so many words in the English Dictionary. Some say the word "truck" might have come from a back-formation of "truckle", meaning "small wheel" or "pulley". In turn, both sources emanate from the Greek trokhos (τροχός), meaning "wheel", from trekhein (τρέχειν, "to run").

Light trucks are classified this way because they are car-sized, yet in the U.S. they can be no more than 6,300 kg (13,900 lb). These are used by not only used by individuals but also businesses as well. In the UK they may not weigh more than 3,500 kg (7,700 lb) and are authorized to drive with a driving license for cars. Pickup trucks, popular in North America, are most seen in North America and some regions of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Although Europe doesn't seem to follow this trend, where the size of the commercial vehicle is most often made as vans.

Known as a truck in the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Puerto Rico, it is essentially a motor vehicle designed to transport cargo. Otherwise known as a lorry in the United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa, and Indian Subcontinent. Trucks vary not only in their types, but also in size, power, and configuration, the smallest being mechanically like an automobile. Commercial trucks may be very large and powerful, configured to mount specialized equipment. These are necessary in the case of fire trucks, concrete mixers, and suction excavators etc.