Vermont Movers Top Rated

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31 Movers in Vermont

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LAST REVIEW

34 5 1 Reviewed 34 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Susan Latz

“Alfred and his crew, Kevin and Bob did an outst...”

“Alfred and his crew, Kevin and Bob did an outstanding job for us today. Moving can be extremely stressful especially ...”

United States Vermont

LAST REVIEW

4 5 1 Reviewed 4 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Kaitlyn P

“Incredible moving organization! In three days n...”

“Incredible moving organization! In three days notice Bobby and his team moved my sweetheart and I out of our loft in ...”

United States Vermont

LAST REVIEW

4 5 1 Reviewed 4 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Doris L

“Nothing could have been any easier. They arrive...”

“Nothing could have been any easier. They arrived on time. They were polite and respectful. They moved quickly and eff...”

United States Vermont

LAST REVIEW

4 5 1 Reviewed 4 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Wendy A.

“For those earlier pictures with damages on the ...”

“For those earlier pictures with damages on the boxes. I share your sentiment and I am sorry this happen to your boxes...”

United States Vermont

LAST REVIEW

4 5 1 Reviewed 4 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Bruce

“Great company”

“Great company”

United States Vermont

LAST REVIEW

4 5 1 Reviewed 4 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Ben S

“The salesman who came out to quote us was very ...”

“The salesman who came out to quote us was very knowledgeable and helpful. The quote we received was less than a comp...”

United States Vermont

LAST REVIEW

3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Robert L

“They are awesome and true professionals, care a...”

“They are awesome and true professionals, care about your property, and take care of it like it was their own, for a l...”

United States Vermont

LAST REVIEW

3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Erin R

“Scratch and his group are AWESOME. They made su...”

“Scratch and his group are AWESOME. They made such an incredible showing with regards to with our turn - they were sup...”

United States Vermont

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Natasha K.

“Great correspondence and sensible cost - moved ...”

“Great correspondence and sensible cost - moved a console piano from a companions house to mine for $210. Likewise bri...”

United States Vermont

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Mannie M

“Do not use, terrible administration. Very Rude!”

“Do not use, terrible administration. Very Rude!”

United States Vermont

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Nancy D

“Totally satisfactory service. They came to pac...”

“Totally satisfactory service. They came to pack us up at the appointed time, moved quickly and efficiently, and were...”

United States Vermont

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Adam W.

“I relocated my business with Transtar and could...”

“I relocated my business with Transtar and couldn't have been happier. I had your typical office stuff to move, but...”

United States Vermont

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Brad C.

“I'm typically truly specific about my possessio...”

“I'm typically truly specific about my possessions so I've had family help me move, yet in light of a companion's prop...”

United States Vermont

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Launi R.

“This group moved me to a third floor condo in J...”

“This group moved me to a third floor condo in July climate. They were so amazing, agreeable, watchful with my things,...”

United States Vermont

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Lindsey F.

“For our late move, we were a mover's bad dream ...”

“For our late move, we were a mover's bad dream in light of the fact that our apartment suite complex is the minimum m...”

United States Vermont

Find Successful Moving Companies in Vermont


What is the most important part of finding the best Vermont moving companies? Discount relocation rates and moving tips will take some tension out of your move, but reading interstate Vermont moving reviews is crucial. A cross country mover can locate a state to state moving company from our list of Vermont interstate movers. For moves within Vermont, don't shy away from reading local moving company reviews. They will be your greatest resource in finding your best Vermont movers. Let Moving Authority give you a free moving quote. You can find the best Vermont priced movers when you have an accurate Vermont movers cost estimate. Moving companies Vermont are here for you.

In the search for an American moving company, you need to know what level of service you require. You'll need to know which Vermont long distance movers can give their customers the best car transport in Vermont. Also, you need to find out which local movers or self-service movers can be trusted to move your furniture. To answer these questions, look no further than Moving Authority. We have Vermont moving company reviews and free moving estimates to help you make a decision. Use our free online quote generator to plan a moving cost estimate for top movers Vermont today!


4 Regular Items You Wouldn't Believe You Can't have in vermont moving and storage

  • House plants. These are living things, so it is strictly prohibited to transport them in a moving truck.
  • Cleaning supplies. Due to their potentially corrosive nature, cleaning supplies must be hand-carried and not packed inside a moving truck.
  • Any type of food. Food is not a hazard, per se, but it is a hygiene concern. Food can spoil during transit, which can be a mess at best and attract vermin at worst.
  • Batteries. Even run-of-the-mill household batteries can ignite a flame if they are positioned incorrectly. For this reason, they are forbidden inside moving trucks.

 

4 Ways Vermont Will Take Your Breath Away

  • The foliage. It’s such a shocker that fall in New England is beautiful, but the colors of the changing leaves in Vermont every autumn is otherworldly.
  • Lake Champlain. Lapping the shoreline of Burlington, VT, this vast and seemingly endless lake provides a seaside feel to the only New England state without access to the Atlantic Ocean.
  • The cheese. The state of Vermont doesn’t merely like cheese; the state of Vermont lives for cheese. World-renowned for having countless types of artisanal cheeses, you’re sure to find a new favorite here.
  • Progressive thinking. From something as small as banning roadside advertisements to being the first state to legalize same-sex marriage, Vermont’s commitment to improving the lives of its residents is heartfelt and honorable.

Tour Burlington, VT Like a Food and Drink Expert—All In One Day

  • Uncommon Grounds — This coffee shop and bakery are perfect for breakfast when it’s cold and foggy out.
  • Cheese & Wine Traders — Make sure to come here when you want to stock up on snacks before spending a day outside in the lovely Vermont nature.
  • Drifter’s Cafe and Bar — This cozy, low-key dining spot will have you full in no time, and wanting to come back for more. With local brews on tap, you’re sure to get a taste of what Vermont has to offer.
  • Ben & Jerry’s — Check out the heart of where this ice cream empire began, and close out your day with a treat at this local-turned-international spot.

The 4 Types of Moving in Vermont, Demystified

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AMSA wanted to help consumers avoid untrustworthy or illegitimate movers. In January 2008, AMSA created the ProMover certification program for its members. As a member, you must have federal interstate operating authority. Members are also required to pass an annual criminal back check, be licensed by the FMCSA, and agree to abide by ethical standards. This would include honesty in advertising and in business transaction with customers. Each must also sign a contract committing to adhere to applicable Surface Transportation Board and FMCSA regulations. AMSA also takes into consideration and examines ownership. They are very strict, registration with state corporation commissions. This means that the mover must maintain at least a satisfactory rating with the Better Business Bureau (BBB). As one can imagine, those that pass are authorized to display the ProMove logo on the websites and in marketing materials. However, those that fail will be expelled from the program (and AMSA) if they cannot correct discrepancies during probation.

Receiving nation attention during the 1960's and 70's, songs and movies about truck driving were major hits. Finding solidarity, truck drivers participated in widespread strikes. Truck drivers from all over opposed the rising cost of fuel. Not to mention this is during the energy crises of 1873 and 1979. In 1980 the Motor Carrier Act drastically deregulated the trucking industry. Since then trucking has come to dominate the freight industry in the latter part of the 20th century. This coincided with what are now known as 'big-box' stores such as Target or Wal-Mart.

Alongside the many different trailers provided are motorcycle trailers. They are designed to haul motorcycles behind an automobile or truck. Depending on size and capability, some trailer may be able to carry several motorcycles or perhaps just one. They specifically designed this trailer to meet the needs of motorcyclists. They carry motorcycles, have ramps, and include tie-downs. There may be a utility trailer adapted permanently or occasionally to haul one or more motorcycles.

Invented in 1890, the diesel engine was not an invention that became well known in popular culture. It was not until the 1930's for the United States to express further interest for diesel engines to be accepted. Gasoline engines were still in use on heavy trucks in the 1970's, while in Europe they had been entirely replaced two decades earlier.

The number one hit on the Billboard chart in 1976 was quite controversial for the trucking industry. "Convoy," is a song about a group of reckless truck drivers bent on evading laws such as toll booths and speed traps. The song went on to inspire the film "Convoy", featuring defiant Kris Kristofferson screaming "piss on your law!" After the film's release, thousands of independent truck drivers went on strike. The participated in violent protests during the 1979 energy crisis. However, similar strikes had occurred during the 1973 energy crisis.

Popular among campers is the use of lightweight trailers, such as aerodynamic trailers. These can be towed by a small car, such as the BMW Air Camper. They are built with the intent to lower the tow of the vehicle, thus minimizing drag.

Without strong land use controls, buildings are too often built in town right along a bypass. This results with the conversion of it into an ordinary town road, resulting in the bypass becoming as congested as the local streets. On the contrary, a bypass is intended to avoid such local street congestion. Gas stations, shopping centers, along with various other businesses are often built alongside them. They are built in hopes of easing accessibility, while home are ideally avoided for noise reasons.

In the United States, commercial truck classification is fixed by each vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8. Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks. Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS, formerly known as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

The United States Department of Transportation has become a fundamental necessity in the moving industry. It is the pinnacle of the industry, creating and enforcing regulations for the sake of safety for both businesses and consumers alike. However, it is notable to appreciate the history of such a powerful department. The functions currently performed by the DOT were once enforced by the Secretary of Commerce for Transportation. In 1965, Najeeb Halaby, administrator of the Federal Aviation Adminstration (FAA), had an excellent suggestion. He spoke to the current President Lyndon B. Johnson, advising that transportation be elevated to a cabinet level position. He continued, suggesting that the FAA be folded or merged, if you will, into the DOT. Clearly, the President took to Halaby's fresh ideas regarding transportation, thus putting the DOT into place.

DOT officers of each state are generally in charge of the enforcement of the Hours of Service (HOS). These are sometimes checked when CMVs pass through weigh stations. Drivers found to be in violation of the HOS can be forced to stop driving for a certain period of time. This, in turn, may negatively affect the motor carrier's safety rating. Requests to change the HOS are a source of debate. Unfortunately, many surveys indicate drivers routinely get away with violating the HOS. Such facts have started yet another debate on whether motor carriers should be required to us EOBRs in their vehicles. Relying on paper-based log books does not always seem to enforce the HOS law put in place for the safety of everyone.

The FMCSA is a well-known division of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). It is generally responsible for the enforcement of FMCSA regulations. The driver of a CMV must keep a record of working hours via a log book. This record must reflect the total number of hours spent driving and resting, as well as the time at which the change of duty status occurred. In place of a log book, a motor carrier may choose to keep track of their hours using an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR). This automatically records the amount of time spent driving the vehicle.

The Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula is a mathematical formula used in the United States to determine the appropriate gross weight for a long distance moving vehicle, based on the axle number and spacing. Enforced by the Department of Transportation upon long-haul truck drivers, it is used as a means of preventing heavy vehicles from damaging roads and bridges. This is especially in particular to the total weight of a loaded truck, whether being used for commercial moving services or for long distance moving services in general.   According to the Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula, the total weight of a loaded truck (tractor and trailer, 5-axle rig) cannot exceed 80,000 lbs in the United States. Under ordinary circumstances, long-haul equipment trucks will weight about 15,000 kg (33,069 lbs). This leaves about 20,000 kg (44,092 lbs) of freight capacity. Likewise, a load is limited to the space available in the trailer, normally with dimensions of 48 ft (14.63 m) or 53 ft (16.15 m) long, 2.6 m (102.4 in) wide, 2.7 m (8 ft 10.3 in) high and 13 ft 6 in or 4.11 m high.

Compliance, Safety, and Accountability (CSA) are fundamental to the FMCSA's compliance program. The purpose of the CSA program is to oversee and focus on motor carriers' safety performance. To enforce such safety regulations, the CSA conducts roadside inspections and crash investigations. The program issues violations when instances of noncompliance with CSA safety regulations are exposed.   Unfortunately, the CSA's number of safety investigation teams and state law enforcement partners are rather small in comparison to the millions of CMV companies and commercial driver license (CDL) holders. A key factor in the CSA program is known as the Safety Measurement System (SMS). This system relies on data analysis to identify unsafe companies to arrange them for safety interventions. SMS is incredibly helpful to CSA in finding and holding companies accountable for safety performance.  

The Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways is most commonly known as the Interstate Highway System, Interstate Freeway System, Interstate System, or simply the Interstate. It is a network of controlled-access highways that forms a part of the National Highway System of the United States. Named after President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who endorsed its formation, the idea was to have portable moving and storage. Construction was authorized by the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956. The original portion was completed 35 years later, although some urban routes were canceled and never built. The network has since been extended and, as of 2013, it had a total length of 47,856 miles (77,017 km), making it the world's second longest after China's. As of 2013, about one-quarter of all vehicle miles driven in the country use the Interstate system. In 2006, the cost of construction had been estimated at about $425 billion (equivalent to $511 billion in 2015).

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) issues Hours of Service regulations. At the same time, they govern the working hours of anyone operating a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in the United States. Such regulations apply to truck drivers, commercial and city bus drivers, and school bus drivers who operate CMVs. With these rules in place, the number of daily and weekly hours spent driving and working is limited. The FMCSA regulates the minimum amount of time drivers must spend resting between driving shifts. In regards to intrastate commerce, the respective state's regulations apply.

Although there are exceptions, city routes are interestingly most often found in the Midwestern area of the United States. Though they essentially serve the same purpose as business routes, they are different. They feature "CITY" signs as opposed to "BUSINESS" signs above or below route shields. Many of these city routes are becoming irrelevant for today's transportation. Due to this, they are being eliminated in favor of the business route designation.

In 1984 the animated TV series The Transformers told the story of a group of extraterrestrial humanoid robots. However, it just so happens that they disguise themselves as automobiles. Their leader of the Autobots clan, Optimus Prime, is depicted as an awesome semi-truck.

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry. There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine. Improvement in transmissions is yet another source, just like the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.   The first state weight limits for trucks were determined and put in place in 1913. Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads. As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and a maximum speed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks to mostly urban areas.

The American Moving & Storage Association (AMSA) is a non-profit trade association. AMSA represents members of the professional moving industry primarily based in the United States. The association consists of approximately 4,000 members. They consist of van lines, their agents, independent movers, forwarders, and industry suppliers. However, AMSA does not represent the self-storage industry.

Heavy trucks. A cement mixer is an example of Class 8 heavy trucks. Heavy trucks are the largest on-road trucks, Class 8. These include vocational applications such as heavy dump trucks, concrete pump trucks, and refuse hauling, as well as ubiquitous long-haul 6×4 and 4x2 tractor units. Road damage and wear increase very rapidly with the axle weight. The axle weight is the truck weight divided by the number of axles, but the actual axle weight depends on the position of the load over the axles. The number of steering axles and the suspension type also influence the amount of the road wear. In many countries with good roads, a six-axle truck may have a maximum weight over 50 tons (49 long tons; 55 short tons).

There many reasons for moving, each one with a unique and specific reason as to why. Relocation services, employee relocation, or workforce mobility can create a range of processes. This process of transferring employees, their families, and/or entire departments of a business to a new location can be difficult. Like some types of employee benefits, these matters are dealt with by human resources specialists within a corporation.