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LAST REVIEW

3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Allison

“AMAZING! I called 6 different places in Dayton ...”

“AMAZING! I called 6 different places in Dayton that all gave me the same quote for 2 guys for 6 hours. Tobin Bros was...”

United States Ohio

LAST REVIEW

3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Paul Ashburn

“Your crew (Tyler B.; Hunter G.; Nick, Kevin, an...”

“Your crew (Tyler B.; Hunter G.; Nick, Kevin, and Derrek) did an outstanding job in completing the move of our furnitu...”

United States Ohio

LAST REVIEW

3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Cannon D

“I would not recomment this organization to anyb...”

“I would not recomment this organization to anybody. While the movers that showed up and really did my turn were pleas...”

United States Ohio

LAST REVIEW

3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - unsatisfied customer

“Had 3 people to assist with recent move and 1 s...”

“Had 3 people to assist with recent move and 1 seriously couldn't keep up. I'm double their age and had to assist with...”

United States Ohio

LAST REVIEW

3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Ricky B

“Would recommend for your next move. Super frie...”

“Would recommend for your next move. Super friendly and efficient movers. Made everything go so much more smoothly!”

United States Ohio

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jeff

“Would not recommend. Damaged a new dining room...”

“Would not recommend. Damaged a new dining room table and although it was repaired well, it took almost 3 weeks. Scr...”

United States Ohio

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Thomas H

“Be careful!!! I masterminded a little move with...”

“Be careful!!! I masterminded a little move with Maverick. Not every one of my things arrived. I recorded a police rep...”

United States Ohio

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Steve Russi

“We had a horrible experience with Leaders. Amo...”

“We had a horrible experience with Leaders. Among other problems, they were simply reckless with the furniture they m...”

United States Ohio

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Fullerton, CA

“Additional consideration was tackled our part t...”

“Additional consideration was tackled our part to safeguard nothing got damaged...something these folks do too. They a...”

United States Ohio

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Julina A.

“Extraordinary movers, moved a tremendous unfath...”

“Extraordinary movers, moved a tremendous unfathomably substantial statue (made of magma!), and were chipper, and prof...”

United States Ohio

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Michael Leonard

“The three guys I had for my move from galion Oh...”

“The three guys I had for my move from galion Ohio to Dublin Ohio with the greatest friendliest and hardest working gu...”

United States Ohio

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Derek L

“Best movers ever!!! They are awesome and very f...”

“Best movers ever!!! They are awesome and very fairly priced:) thanks so much for making our move so much easier!”

United States Ohio

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Cathie K.

“What a blessing! Matt and Ken were wonderful! ...”

“What a blessing! Matt and Ken were wonderful! I lived upstairs and they were up and down the stairs so many times a...”

United States Ohio

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Marie M

“I required a mover to move me from Scottsdale t...”

“I required a mover to move me from Scottsdale to Chandler. They accompanied right size truck 26' and 3 men and were s...”

United States Ohio

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Cindy Walker

“Excellent company with great employees. I was ...”

“Excellent company with great employees. I was referred to them by our realtor and they provided a great packing movi...”

United States Ohio

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When you're searching for the best priced Ohio movers, it can feel confusing to know where to begin. This is where Moving Authority comes in. We are here to offer more than just moving tips; we have interstate city moving reviews available to help you make the best possible decision. Finding a state to state moving company from our list of Ohio interstate movers is easy as pie. What if you're not looking for a cross country mover? For customers moving within Ohio, we list the best Ohio moving companies with local moving company reviews. Fill out our form for a free moving quote and get connected to the best Ohio movers. With an Ohio movers cost estimate, you can seek out discount relocation rates.

By reading Ohio moving company reviews, you are finding out a lot of useful information. You can compare services for Ohio long distance movers, local movers, and self-service movers. You may want the best car transport in Ohio, so you need an American moving company that will offer more than an affordable moving cost estimate. Relocating means more than paying someone to move your furniture. Make sure you are an informed consumer. You can collect free moving estimates on Moving Authority and compare prices to get the best deal. Find the best moving company Ohio today!

Little-Known Packing Hacks to Make Settling In a Breeze



4 Awesome Ways to Spend the Day in Ohio

  • Head to the "beach" at Lake Erie
  • Tour the Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal
  • Rock through the Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame
  • Hike through Hocking Hills or Cuyahoga Valley National Park


4 Ways You Can Engineer YOUR MOVE




Top 10 Facts About Ohio

1. Home to the largest basket in the world.

2. 7th largest state by population.

3. 7 US Presidents are from Ohio.

4. Despite not having access to the ocean, you can still surf on Lake Erie.

5. In Ohio, it’s illegal to fish for whales on Sunday.

6. Neil Armstrong, the first man on the moon, was from Ohio.

7. Akron, OH was one of the first US cities to use police cars.

8. Ohio has the largest Amish population in the US.

9. Lifesaver Candy was invented in Ohio as a “summer candy” because it wouldn’t melt in your hands.

10. Ohio has the only non-square state flag.



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Many people are familiar with this type of moving, using truck rental services, or borrowing similar hardware, is known as DIY moving. Whoever is renting a truck or trailer large enough to carry their household goods may obtain moving equipment if necessary. Equipment may be items such as dollies, furniture pads, and cargo belts to protect furniture and to ease the moving process.

In many countries, driving a truck requires a special driving license. The requirements and limitations vary with each different jurisdiction.

In the United States, shipments larger than about 7,000 kg (15,432 lb) are classified as truckload freight (TL). It is more efficient and affordable for a large shipment to have exclusive use of one larger trailer. This is opposed to having to share space on a smaller Less than Truckload freight carrier.

“ The first original song about truck driving appeared in 1939 when Cliff Bruner and His Boys recorded Ted Daffan's "Truck Driver's Blues," a song explicitly marketed to roadside cafe owners who were installing juke boxes in record numbers to serve truckers and other motorists.” - Shane Hamilton

“Country music scholar Bill Malone has gone so far as to say that trucking songs account for the largest component of work songs in the country music catalog. For a style of music that has, since its commercial inception in the 1920s, drawn attention to the coal man, the steel drivin’ man, the railroad worker, and the cowboy, this certainly speaks volumes about the cultural attraction of the trucker in the American popular consciousness.” — Shane Hamilton

Invented in 1890, the diesel engine was not an invention that became well known in popular culture. It was not until the 1930's for the United States to express further interest for diesel engines to be accepted. Gasoline engines were still in use on heavy trucks in the 1970's, while in Europe they had been entirely replaced two decades earlier.

The number one hit on the Billboard chart in 1976 was quite controversial for the trucking industry. "Convoy," is a song about a group of reckless truck drivers bent on evading laws such as toll booths and speed traps. The song went on to inspire the film "Convoy", featuring defiant Kris Kristofferson screaming "piss on your law!" After the film's release, thousands of independent truck drivers went on strike. The participated in violent protests during the 1979 energy crisis. However, similar strikes had occurred during the 1973 energy crisis.

The interstate moving industry in the United States maintains regulation by the FMCSA, which is part of the USDOT. With only a small staff (fewer than 20 people) available to patrol hundreds of moving companies, enforcement is difficult. As a result of such a small staff, there are in many cases, no regulations that qualify moving companies as 'reliable'. Without this guarantee, it is difficult to a consumer to make a choice. Although, moving companies can provide and often display a DOT license.

Popular among campers is the use of lightweight trailers, such as aerodynamic trailers. These can be towed by a small car, such as the BMW Air Camper. They are built with the intent to lower the tow of the vehicle, thus minimizing drag.

The United States' Interstate Highway System is full of bypasses and loops with the designation of a three-digit number. Usually beginning with an even digit, it is important to note that this pattern is highly inconsistent. For example, in Des Moines, Iowa the genuine bypass is the main route. More specifically, it is Interstate 35 and Interstate 80, with the loop into downtown Des Moines being Interstate 235. As it is illustrated in this example, they do not always consistently begin with an even number. However, the 'correct' designation is exemplified in Omaha, Nebraska. In Omaha, Interstate 480 traverses the downtown area, which is bypassed by Interstate 80, Interstate 680, and Interstate 95. Interstate 95 then in turn goes through Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Furthermore, Interstate 295 is the bypass around Philadelphia, which leads into New Jersey. Although this can all be rather confusing, it is most important to understand the Interstate Highway System and the role bypasses play.

In the United States, commercial truck classification is fixed by each vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8. Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks. Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS, formerly known as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

As of January 1, 2000, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) was established as its own separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation. This came about under the "Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999". The FMCSA is based in Washington, D.C., employing more than 1,000 people throughout all 50 States, including in the District of Columbia. Their staff dedicates themselves to the improvement of safety among commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and to saving lives.

The Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula is a mathematical formula used in the United States to determine the appropriate gross weight for a long distance moving vehicle, based on the axle number and spacing. Enforced by the Department of Transportation upon long-haul truck drivers, it is used as a means of preventing heavy vehicles from damaging roads and bridges. This is especially in particular to the total weight of a loaded truck, whether being used for commercial moving services or for long distance moving services in general.   According to the Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula, the total weight of a loaded truck (tractor and trailer, 5-axle rig) cannot exceed 80,000 lbs in the United States. Under ordinary circumstances, long-haul equipment trucks will weight about 15,000 kg (33,069 lbs). This leaves about 20,000 kg (44,092 lbs) of freight capacity. Likewise, a load is limited to the space available in the trailer, normally with dimensions of 48 ft (14.63 m) or 53 ft (16.15 m) long, 2.6 m (102.4 in) wide, 2.7 m (8 ft 10.3 in) high and 13 ft 6 in or 4.11 m high.

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a division of the USDOT specializing in highway transportation. The agency's major influential activities are generally separated into two different "programs". The first is the Federal-aid Highway Program. This provides financial aid to support the construction, maintenance, and operation of the U.S. highway network. The second program, the Federal Lands Highway Program, shares a similar name with different intentions. The purpose of this program is to improve transportation involving Federal and Tribal lands. They also focus on preserving "national treasures" for the historic and beatific enjoyment for all.

A circumferential route refers to a public transportation system that follows the route in the shape of a circle. Over time a nickname developed in the European Union, calling transportation networks such as these a "ring road". This is no surprise as Europe has several famous "ring roads" such as the Berliner Ring, the Brussels Ring, the Amsterdam Ring, the Boulevard Périphérique around Paris and the Leeds Inner and Outer ring roads. Other countries adopted the term as well which in turn made the name go international. Australia's Melbourne's Western Ring Road and India's Hyderabad's Outer Ring Road both adopted the name. However in Canada, the term is most commonly used, with "orbital" used to a much lesser extent.   On the contrary, the United States calls many "ring roads" as belt-lines, beltways, or loops instead. For example, the Capital Beltway around Washington, D.C. Some ring roads use terminology such as "Inner Loop" and "Outer Loop". This is, of course, for the sake of directional sense, since compass directions cannot be determined around the entire loop.

Although there are exceptions, city routes are interestingly most often found in the Midwestern area of the United States. Though they essentially serve the same purpose as business routes, they are different. They feature "CITY" signs as opposed to "BUSINESS" signs above or below route shields. Many of these city routes are becoming irrelevant for today's transportation. Due to this, they are being eliminated in favor of the business route designation.

The 1950's were quite different than the years to come. They were more likely to be considered "Knights of the Road", if you will, for helping stranded travelers. In these times truck drivers were envied and were viewed as an opposition to the book "The Organization Man". Bestseller in 1956, author William H. Whyte's novel describes "the man in the gray flannel suit", who sat in an office every day. He's describing a typical office style job that is very structured with managers watching over everyone. Truck drivers represented the opposite of all these concepts. Popular trucking songs glorified the life of drivers as independent "wanderers". Yet, there were attempts to bring back the factory style efficiency, such as using tachnographs. Although most attempts resulted in little success. Drivers routinely sabotaged and discovered new ways to falsify the machine's records.

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry. There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine. Improvement in transmissions is yet another source, just like the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.   The first state weight limits for trucks were determined and put in place in 1913. Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads. As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and a maximum speed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks to mostly urban areas.

Many people are familiar with this type of moving, using truck rental services, or borrowing similar hardware, is known as DIY moving. Whoever is renting a truck or trailer large enough to carry their household goods may obtain moving equipment if necessary. Equipment may be items such as dollies, furniture pads, and cargo belts to protect furniture and to ease the moving process.