North Carolina Movers Top Rated

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Brenda O.

“They moved me from 4 story townhouse to a 4 sto...”

“They moved me from 4 story townhouse to a 4 story present day new home that has 86 stairs through and through. There ...”

United States North Carolina

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 2.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Beth C

“In the wake of contracting this moving organiza...”

“In the wake of contracting this moving organization, I was significantly frustrated. They appeared without enough box...”

United States North Carolina

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jason G.

“Reuben did an AMAZING job moving 3 sheds for us...”

“Reuben did an AMAZING job moving 3 sheds for us from a neighbor down the street. We didn't think it would be possible...”

United States North Carolina

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Leslie

“Would Recommend 2 men and a truck, they spared ...”

“Would Recommend 2 men and a truck, they spared me a considerable measure of cerebral pain, they were incredible folks...”

United States North Carolina

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Scott N.

“Fabulous Job. Exceedingly suggest these folks. ...”

“Fabulous Job. Exceedingly suggest these folks. On-Time and extremely mindful to detail, which made us feel exceptiona...”

United States North Carolina

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United States North Carolina

Find Top-Rated Moving Companies In North Carolina


Here at Moving Authority, we make it easy to find a cross country movers NC. We have Interstate NC moving reviews for all our North Carolina interstate movers. This means that your 
state to state moving company is just a few clicks away. When you're moving within North Carolina, you want the best North Carolina movers. Moving Authority is your connection to discount relocation rates on NC moving companies. To find your best North Carolina priced movers, let us get you a free moving quote. With an accurate North Carolina move cost estimate, you can make a smart decision. Stay on Moving Authority for local moving company reviews as well as moving tips and guides.

Local movers and self-service movers are often overlooked. Instead, many consumers hire North Carolina long distance movers. If you want the best car transport in North Carolina or to move your furniture, it pays to consider every option. Get free moving estimates from every American moving company on your list. Also, read state Carolina moving company reviews. When you're ready to get a moving cost estimate, let Moving Authority help you out.


3 Types of Storage Options, Unpacked

  • Storage warehouses. These facilities are generally large buildings owned by a moving company. They are outfitted with a temperature control and an alarm system. This ensures multiple layers of protection.
  • Pod storage. Moving companies deliver these “pods” to customers at home. These a large, portable storage containers which stay with the customer until the pod is full. The customer has two options at this point. The first is to keep the pod at home or to have it picked up again by the moving company, and taken to a pod storage facility.
  • Moving with Storage. Sometimes, people downsize when they move and need a place to stow their extra stuff. If you’re moving to a smaller place and need help with both the move itself and the storage, don’t stress. This is a common type of transition and your NC movers are well equipped to handle these two jobs at once.

THE ESSENTIALS OF COMMERCIAL MOVING: 4 Things You Need To Consider

  • Inventory. This step is vital to not only knowing how large-scale your move is, but also keeping track of everything. Additionally, it helps your moving company draft up a plan for the duration of the move, and how many movers to send. And, of course, it helps you follow a timeline for your own peace of mind.
  • Fragile items. No one wants broken stuff, so if you’re packing by yourself, treat your breakables with care. If you are having your movers pack and wrap for you, be sure to brief them on what items need extra care.
  • Insurance. Reputable moving companies in North Carolina will offer an insurance on their services. Even though no movers in NC plan to mishandle a customer’s items, accidents do happen. Moving companies want to be prepared. When you select a moving company, ask about their insurance and how to make a claim, should the need arise.
  • Downtime. Work with your movers to calculate exactly how long the move will take. This way, you can understand how long you will need to close your doors. Movers are businesspeople too. They understand that the longer a move takes, the less time you can make money. Your movers NC will be more than happy to cut their downtime to make sure that you’re not missing out on profits.



Why You Should Hire Pro Movers, ACCORDING TO Science

  • Movers understand the ins and outs of relocation. They do this stuff all day, every day, and with each new job on the books, they are refining their skills.
  • The relocation industry is no place for mediocrity. In this business, only the best make the cut with moving companies North Carolina.
  • As much as we all wish they didn't, accidents happen from time to time. All your items are insured against mishaps when you choose to do business with movers.
  • When you're coming from a new place, it's instrumental to have someone on your team who knows the area. Local moving companies in NC is the key to having an efficient move to a place that's unfamiliar to you.



4 Factors of a Rental Truck Price You Can’t Afford to Know

  • The date required. The first rule of thumb when renting a truck is to know the timeframe for the rental. This is the first step in understanding how much you will be looking at paying for the truck.
  • The truck size. Most moving companies NC offer a wide range of sizes for their moving trucks and trailers. This is information you’ll need to supply when you begin to gather quotes. The best way to prepare to answer this question is to gain an idea of how much stuff you’ll be moving. Then, figure out how much space that will take up in a moving truck.
  • The location of pick-up and drop-off. Many moves will stay local, so these locations will be the same. But, for long-distance moves, it's a different situation. Customers will pick up their moving truck rental in one city and drop it off in another. This situation causes many people to seek out big-box moving chains. Dropping off in another location seems impossible with a small moving company. You’d be surprised that this isn’t always the case!
  • The distance you’re traveling. This makes a huge difference in the price of the rental. Local moves cost less as far as mileage. The bulk of the cost of long-distance moves comes from the mileage charges.

North Carolina Movers

People who are moving in and out of the state are lucky to have the North Carolina Movers Association at their disposal. This group regulates the moving industry within the state, as well as ensures that customers of North Carolina moving companies are getting quality service. Similar to Moving Authority, the moving association focuses on the customer before anything else. A great sense of relief comes into our minds in knowing that our North Carolina movers are being taken care of. 

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Very light trucks. Popular in Europe and Asia, many mini-trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles, usually with monocoque bodies. Specialized designs with substantial frames such as the Italian Piaggio shown here are based upon Japanese designs (in this case by Daihatsu) and are popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities that often have very narrow alleyways. Regardless of the name, these small trucks serve a wide range of uses. In Japan, they are regulated under the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break on taxes for buying a smaller and less-powerful vehicle (currently, the engine is limited to 660 ccs {0.66L} displacement). These vehicles are used as on-road utility vehicles in Japan. These Japanese-made mini trucks that were manufactured for on-road use are competing with off-road ATVs in the United States, and import regulations require that these mini trucks have a 25 mph (40 km/h) speed governor as they are classified as low-speed vehicles. These vehicles have found uses in construction, large campuses (government, university, and industrial), agriculture, cattle ranches, amusement parks, and replacements for golf carts.Major mini truck manufacturers and their brands: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishi Minicab, Subaru Sambar, Suzuki Carry   As with many things in Europe and Asia, the illusion of delicacy and proper manners always seems to attract tourists. Popular in Europe and Asia, mini trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles with monochrome bodies. Such specialized designs with such great frames such as the Italian Piaggio, based upon Japanese designs. In this case it was based upon Japanese designs made by Daihatsu. These are very popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities, which often have very narrow alleyways. Despite whatever name they are called, these very light trucks serve a wide variety of purposes.   Yet, in Japan they are regulated under the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break in taxes for buying a small and less-powerful vehicle. Currently, the engine is limited to 660 cc [0.66L] displacement. These vehicles began being used as on-road utility vehicles in Japan. Classified as a low speed vehicle, these Japanese-made mini trucks were manufactured for on-road use for competing the the off-road ATVs in the United States. Import regulations require that the mini trucks have a 25 mph (40km/h) speed governor. Again, this is because they are low speed vehicles.   However, these vehicles have found numerous amounts of ways to help the community. They invest money into the government, universities, amusement parks, and replacements for golf cars. They have some major Japanese mini truck manufacturarers as well as brands such as: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishit Minicab, Subaru Sambar, and Suzuki Carry.

The decade of the 70s saw the heyday of truck driving, and the dramatic rise in the popularity of "trucker culture". Truck drivers were romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws (and this stereotype persists even today). This was due in part to their use of citizens' band (CB) radio to relay information to each other regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. Plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and using CB slang were popular not just with drivers but among the general public.

Trailer stability can be defined as the tendency of a trailer to dissipate side-to-side motion. The initial motion may be caused by aerodynamic forces, such as from a cross wind or a passing vehicle. One common criterion for stability is the center of mass location with respect to the wheels, which can usually be detected by tongue weight. If the center of mass of the trailer is behind its wheels, therefore having a negative tongue weight, the trailer will likely be unstable. Another parameter which is less commonly a factor is the trailer moment of inertia. Even if the center of mass is forward of the wheels, a trailer with a long load, and thus large moment of inertia, may be unstable.

A semi-trailer is almost exactly what it sounds like, it is a trailer without a front axle. Proportionally, its weight is supported by two factors. The weight falls upon a road tractor or by a detachable front axle assembly, known as a dolly. Generally, a semi-trailer is equipped with legs, known in the industry as "landing gear". This means it can be lowered to support it when it is uncoupled. In the United States, a trailer may not exceed a length of 57 ft (17.37 m) on interstate highways. However, it is possible to link two smaller trailers together to reach a length of 63 ft (19.20 m).

A business route (occasionally city route) in the United States and Canada is a short special route connected to a parent numbered highway at its beginning, then routed through the central business district of a nearby city or town, and finally reconnecting with the same parent numbered highway again at its end.

Business routes always have the same number as the routes they parallel. For example, U.S. 1 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, U.S. Route 1, and Interstate 40 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, Interstate 40.

Without strong land use controls, buildings are too often built in town right along a bypass. This results with the conversion of it into an ordinary town road, resulting in the bypass becoming as congested as the local streets. On the contrary, a bypass is intended to avoid such local street congestion. Gas stations, shopping centers, along with various other businesses are often built alongside them. They are built in hopes of easing accessibility, while home are ideally avoided for noise reasons.

In the United States, commercial truck classification is fixed by each vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8. Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks. Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS, formerly known as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

Public transportation is vital to a large part of society and is in dire need of work and attention. In 2010, the DOT awarded $742.5 million in funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to 11 transit projects. The awardees specifically focused light rail projects. One includes both a commuter rail extension and a subway project in New York City. The public transportation New York City has to offer is in need of some TLC. Another is working on a rapid bus transit system in Springfield, Oregon. The funds also subsidize a heavy rail project in northern Virginia. This finally completes the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority's Metro Silver Line, connecting to Washington, D.C., and the Washington Dulles International Airport. This is important because the DOT has previously agreed to subsidize the Silver Line construction to Reston, Virginia.

The FMCSA is a well-known division of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). It is generally responsible for the enforcement of FMCSA regulations. The driver of a CMV must keep a record of working hours via a log book. This record must reflect the total number of hours spent driving and resting, as well as the time at which the change of duty status occurred. In place of a log book, a motor carrier may choose to keep track of their hours using an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR). This automatically records the amount of time spent driving the vehicle.

Implemented in 2014, the National Registry, requires all Medical Examiners (ME) who conduct physical examinations and issue medical certifications for interstate CMV drivers to complete training on FMCSA’s physical qualification standards, must pass a certification test. This is to demonstrate competence through periodic training and testing. CMV drivers whose medical certifications expire must use MEs on the National Registry for their examinations. FMCSA has reached its goal of at least 40,000 certified MEs signing onto the registry. All this means is that drivers or movers can now find certified medical examiners throughout the country who can perform their medical exam. FMCSA is preparing to issue a follow-on “National Registry 2” rule stating new requirements. In this case, MEs are to submit medical certificate information on a daily basis. These daily updates are sent to the FMCSA, which will then be sent to the states electronically. This process will dramatically decrease the chance of drivers falsifying medical cards.

Although there are exceptions, city routes are interestingly most often found in the Midwestern area of the United States. Though they essentially serve the same purpose as business routes, they are different. They feature "CITY" signs as opposed to "BUSINESS" signs above or below route shields. Many of these city routes are becoming irrelevant for today's transportation. Due to this, they are being eliminated in favor of the business route designation.

Throughout the United States, bypass routes are a special type of route most commonly used on an alternative routing of a highway around a town. Specifically when the main route of the highway goes through the town. Originally, these routes were designated as "truck routes" as a means to divert trucking traffic away from towns. However, this name was later changed by AASHTO in 1959 to what we now call a "bypass". Many "truck routes" continue to remain regardless that the mainline of the highway prohibits trucks.

The concept of a bypass is a simple one. It is a road or highway that purposely avoids or "bypasses" a built-up area, town, or village. Bypasses were created with the intent to let through traffic flow without having to get stuck in local traffic. In general they are supposed to reduce congestion in a built-up area. By doing so, road safety will greatly improve.   A bypass designated for trucks traveling a long distance, either commercial or otherwise, is called a truck route.

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry. There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine. Improvement in transmissions is yet another source, just like the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.   The first state weight limits for trucks were determined and put in place in 1913. Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads. As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and a maximum speed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks to mostly urban areas.

Unfortunately for the trucking industry, their image began to crumble during the latter part of the 20th century. As a result, their reputation suffered. More recently truckers have been portrayed as chauvinists or even worse, serial killers. The portrayals of semi-trailer trucks have focused on stories of the trucks becoming self-aware. Generally, this is with some extraterrestrial help.

The American Moving & Storage Association (AMSA) is a non-profit trade association. AMSA represents members of the professional moving industry primarily based in the United States. The association consists of approximately 4,000 members. They consist of van lines, their agents, independent movers, forwarders, and industry suppliers. However, AMSA does not represent the self-storage industry.

Moving companies that operate within the borders of a particular state are usually regulated by the state DOT. Sometimes the public utility commission in that state will take care of it. This only applies to some of the U.S. states such as in California (California Public Utilities Commission) or Texas (Texas Department of Motor Vehicles. However, no matter what state you are in it is always best to make sure you are compliant with that state

Known as a truck in the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Puerto Rico, it is essentially a motor vehicle designed to transport cargo. Otherwise known as a lorry in the United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa, and Indian Subcontinent. Trucks vary not only in their types, but also in size, power, and configuration, the smallest being mechanically like an automobile. Commercial trucks may be very large and powerful, configured to mount specialized equipment. These are necessary in the case of fire trucks, concrete mixers, and suction excavators etc.