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2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Chris L

“For the current week we moved our family crossw...”

“For the current week we moved our family crosswise over Austin from Pflugerville toward the west side. We discovered ...”

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 20.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - ricky

“Using Allied Moving Group was a horrible experi...”

“Using Allied Moving Group was a horrible experience. We used them to move my daughter from NY to Miami. They lied to ...”

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Marisol S

“We have utilized Key Moving twice. Once for a m...”

“We have utilized Key Moving twice. Once for a move inside the Bronx and felt so agreeable that we utilized them for a...”

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Joseph S.

“There is no cost too high to pay for incredible...”

“There is no cost too high to pay for incredible movers. Disregard all the ghastliness stories. These folks will a...”

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 20.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Li wang

“This review is a summary of cases of over three...”

“This review is a summary of cases of over three dozens of victims of this company from the summer 2017! These victims...”

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 20.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Paul

“Is there no way to give 0 stars? They're the wo...”

“Is there no way to give 0 stars? They're the worst moving company I've ever heard of. Lost half the stuff- irreplacea...”

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - John K

“SUPER EFFICIENT... SUPER FAST... (once in a whi...”

“SUPER EFFICIENT... SUPER FAST... (once in a while some beast power is required in moving...) and SUPER FAIR PRICING O...”

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Derek H

“They were very much evaluated and you get what ...”

“They were very much evaluated and you get what you pay for.”

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Loren

“This company was great to work with, everyone w...”

“This company was great to work with, everyone was so accommodating and helpful. I moved across 3 states with a whole ...”

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Adam Binder

“Ron, Jeff and their whole group are astounding....”

“Ron, Jeff and their whole group are astounding. They offered me some assistance with moving on next to no notificatio...”

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Elizabeth C

“Called that day for help with a couple of expan...”

“Called that day for help with a couple of expansive bits of furniture I expected to get all over a few stairs. They c...”

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Marie D

“To make a long story short I hired All about fa...”

“To make a long story short I hired All about family because they were the first to call back after I put my informati...”

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Olga M

“Avoid THIS COMPANY!!! The level of administrati...”

“Avoid THIS COMPANY!!! The level of administration gave by the business is terrible. In the event that you choose to m...”

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Grace C.

“These guys have unbeatable work ethic. They mov...”

“These guys have unbeatable work ethic. They moved my three bedroom house faster thank I could blink. It was a bit ov...”

United States New Jersey

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Kate R

“Mark and his crew are absolutely amazing. They ...”

“Mark and his crew are absolutely amazing. They moved us in the middle of a hurricane, and all of the guys kept moving...”

United States New Jersey

Check Out These Great New Jersey Movers

Read our interstate New Jersey moving reviews to find the best cross country mover. After searching through our list of New Jersey interstate movers, the task of finding a reputable state to state moving company won't seem so daunting. The best NJ moving companies are sometimes found in local moving company reviews, so don't forget to check those out as well. Let Moving Authority give you a free moving quote. Once you have a New Jersey movers cost estimate, you'll be able to create a budget and get started on your move.

NJ moving company reviews are available to help you find an American moving company. When you want to move your furniture or have the best car transport in New Jersey, look no further. Free moving estimates are always attainable with our quote generator. For information about New Jersey long distance movers, local movers, and self service movers, you're in the right place. Scope out a moving cost estimate today, and see how easy your move can be with Moving Authority.

The moving companies NJ advertises as the best are usually your best bet for moving companies in NJ. However, to have the top NJ moving experience, it's recommended to check New Jersey movers reviews. Moving companies New Jersey locals say are worth the money can be found here in peer reviews. Choose your moving company NJ today and get moving!

Confused About the Etiquette of Tipping Movers?

  • The question of whether or not to tip movers is hotly debated in this day and age.
  • Some argue that movers make a wage from their moving companies and should not need a tip, however the fact of the matter is that wages for movers can be low. Giving them a tip is not paying them extra out of your pocket, but showing them gratitude for a job well done.
  • Many people are unsure of how much is appropriate to tip, and there’s really no flat standard as far as gratuities are concerned.
  • Factors for the tip include: the level of service you received, how intensive your moving job was, the amount of movers required, the amount of time it took.
  • Ultimately, the decision whether or not to tip falls on your shoulders, and the most basic formula for tipping is to give 5%-10% of the total cost of the move.



4 Things To Consider When Estimating the Cost of Your Home Move



The 5 Most Common Reasons For That Increased Moving Price

  • Sometimes, customers receive moving quotes that don’t quite encompass everything you require from a moving company.
  • This is no one’s fault, simply a misunderstanding between the customer and the representative from the moving company in NJ that issued the quote.
  • If you miscalculate how much stuff you’ll be moving, the price can go up with the added weight.
  • A lot of customers don’t realize that when a New Jersey mover has to use stairs or elevators, this can take extra time and, in turn, cost more money in hourly labor charges.
  • Reputable moving companies in New Jersey insured their customers’ items at sixty cents per pound, but you can also choose full value insurance on your items for an additional fee, which is something that can raise your price.
  • If you suddenly request your movers to unpack your boxes, you’ll be paying for extra labor.
  • In the event that you’re not there to meet your movers New Jersey at any point in the journey, you will be charged a waiting fee for the time that they were waiting for you, unable to work.



Little-Known Facts for First-Time Military Moves

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The main purpose of the HOS regulation is to prevent accidents due to driver fatigue. To do this, the number of driving hours per day, as well as the number of driving hours per week, have been limited. Another measure to prevent fatigue is to keep drivers on a 21 to 24-hour schedule in order to maintain a natural sleep/wake cycle. Drivers must take a daily minimum period of rest and are allowed longer "weekend" rest periods. This is in hopes to combat cumulative fatigue effects that accrue on a weekly basis.

In American English, the word "truck" has historically been preceded by a word describing the type of vehicle, such as a "tanker truck". In British English, preference would lie with "tanker" or "petrol tanker".

Prior to the 20th century, freight was generally transported overland via trains and railroads. During this time, trains were essential, and they were highly efficient at moving large amounts of freight. But, they could only deliver that freight to urban centers for distribution by horse-drawn transport. Though there were several trucks throughout this time, they were used more as space for advertising that for actual utility. At this time, the use of range for trucks was quite challenging. The use of electric engines, lack of paved rural roads, and small load capacities limited trucks to most short-haul urban routes.

In many countries, driving a truck requires a special driving license. The requirements and limitations vary with each different jurisdiction.

The intention of a trailer coupler is to secure the trailer to the towing vehicle. It is an important piece, as the trailer couple attaches to the trailer ball. This then forms a ball and socket connection. It allows for relative movement between the towing vehicle and trailer while towing over uneven road surfaces. The trailer ball should be mounted to the rear bumper or to a drawbar, which may be removable. The drawbar secures to the trailer hitch by inserting it into the hitch receiver and pinning it.   The three most common types of couplers used are straight couplers, A-frame couplers, and adjustable couplers. Another option is bumper-pull hitches in which case draw bars can exert a large amount of leverage on the tow vehicle. This makes it harder to recover from a swerving situation (thus it may not be the safest choice depending on your trip).

A trailer is not very difficult to categorize. In general, it is an unpowered vehicle towed by a powered vehicle. Trailers are most commonly used for the transport of goods and materials. Although some do enjoy recreational usage of trailers as well. 

In 2009, the book 'Trucking Country: The Road to America's Walmart Economy' debuted, written by author Shane Hamilton. This novel explores the interesting history of trucking and connects certain developments. Particularly how such development in the trucking industry have helped the so-called big-box stored. Examples of these would include Walmart or Target, they dominate the retail sector of the U.S. economy. Yet, Hamilton connects historical and present-day evidence that connects such correlations.

In 1971, author and director Steven Spielberg, debuted his first feature length film. His made-for-tv film, Duel, portrayed a truck driver as an anonymous stalker. Apparently there seems to be a trend in the 70's to negatively stigmatize truck drivers.

Many modern trucks are powered by diesel engines, although small to medium size trucks with gas engines exist in the United States. The European Union rules that vehicles with a gross combination of mass up to 3,500 kg (7,716 lb) are also known as light commercial vehicles. Any vehicles exceeding that weight are known as large goods vehicles.

A semi-trailer is almost exactly what it sounds like, it is a trailer without a front axle. Proportionally, its weight is supported by two factors. The weight falls upon a road tractor or by a detachable front axle assembly, known as a dolly. Generally, a semi-trailer is equipped with legs, known in the industry as "landing gear". This means it can be lowered to support it when it is uncoupled. In the United States, a trailer may not exceed a length of 57 ft (17.37 m) on interstate highways. However, it is possible to link two smaller trailers together to reach a length of 63 ft (19.20 m).

Popular among campers is the use of lightweight trailers, such as aerodynamic trailers. These can be towed by a small car, such as the BMW Air Camper. They are built with the intent to lower the tow of the vehicle, thus minimizing drag.

Without strong land use controls, buildings are too often built in town right along a bypass. This results with the conversion of it into an ordinary town road, resulting in the bypass becoming as congested as the local streets. On the contrary, a bypass is intended to avoid such local street congestion. Gas stations, shopping centers, along with various other businesses are often built alongside them. They are built in hopes of easing accessibility, while home are ideally avoided for noise reasons.

In 1986 Stephen King released horror film "Maximum Overdrive", a campy kind of story. It is really about trucks that become animated due to radiation emanating from a passing comet. Oddly enough, the trucks force humans to pump their diesel fuel. Their leader is portrayed as resembling Spider-Man's antagonist Green Goblin.

Relocation, or moving, is the process of vacating a fixed location, such as a residence or business, and settling in a different one. A move might be to a nearby location such as in the same neighborhood or a much farther location in a different city or even a different country. Moving usually includes packing up all belongings, transferring them to the new location, and unpacking them. It will also be necessary to update administrative information. This includes tasks such as notifying the post office, changing registration data, change of insurance, services etc. It is important to remember this step in the relocation process. 

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a division of the USDOT specializing in highway transportation. The agency's major influential activities are generally separated into two different "programs". The first is the Federal-aid Highway Program. This provides financial aid to support the construction, maintenance, and operation of the U.S. highway network. The second program, the Federal Lands Highway Program, shares a similar name with different intentions. The purpose of this program is to improve transportation involving Federal and Tribal lands. They also focus on preserving "national treasures" for the historic and beatific enjoyment for all.

The USDOT (USDOT or DOT) is considered a federal Cabinet department within the U.S. government. Clearly, this department concerns itself with all aspects of transportation with safety as a focal point. The DOT was officially established by an act of Congress on October 15, 1966, beginning its operation on April 1, 1967. Superior to the DOT, the United States Secretary of Transportation governs the department. The mission of the DOT is to "Serve the United States by ensuring a fast, safe, efficient, accessible, and convenient transportation system that meets our vital national interests and enhances the quality of life for the American people, today and into the future." Essentially this states how important it is to improve all types of transportation as a way to enhance both safety and life in general etc. It is important to note that the DOT is not in place to hurt businesses, but to improve our "vital national interests" and our "quality of life". The transportation networks are in definite need of such fundamental attention. Federal departments such as the USDOT are key to this industry by creating and enforcing regulations with intentions to increase the efficiency and safety of transportation. 

The feature film "Joy Ride" premiered in 2001, portraying the story of two college-age brothers who by a CB radio while taking a road trip. Although the plot seems lighthearted, it takes a quick turn after one of the brothers attempts a prank on an unknown truck driver. They soon find out the dangerous intentions of this killer driver, who is set on getting his revenge. Seven years later in 2008 the sequel "Joy Ride 2: Dead Ahead" came out on DVD only. Similar to its predecessor, the plot involves another murdering truck driver, a.k.a "Rusty Nail". He essentially plays psychological mind games with a young couple on a road trip.

The 1980s were full of happening things, but in 1982 a Southern California truck driver gained short-lived fame. His name was Larry Walters, also known as "Lawn Chair Larry", for pulling a crazy stunt. He ascended to a height of 16,000 feet (4,900 m) by attaching helium balloons to a lawn chair, hence the name. Walters claims he only intended to remain floating near the ground and was shocked when his chair shot up at a rate of 1,000 feet (300 m) per minute. The inspiration for such a stunt Walters claims his poor eyesight for ruining his dreams to become an Air Force pilot.

In today's popular culture, recreational vehicles struggle to find their own niche. Travel trailers or mobile home with limited living facilities, or where people can camp or stay have been referred to as trailers. Previously, many would refer to such vehicles as towable trailers.

Light trucks are classified this way because they are car-sized, yet in the U.S. they can be no more than 6,300 kg (13,900 lb). These are used by not only used by individuals but also businesses as well. In the UK they may not weigh more than 3,500 kg (7,700 lb) and are authorized to drive with a driving license for cars. Pickup trucks, popular in North America, are most seen in North America and some regions of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Although Europe doesn't seem to follow this trend, where the size of the commercial vehicle is most often made as vans.

In today's society, there are rules and regulations everywhere you go, the same goes for commercial vehicles. The federal government has strict regulations that must be met, such as how many hours a driver may be on the clock. For example, 11 hours driving /14 hours on-duty followed by 10 hours off, with a max of 70 hours/8 days or 60 hours/7 days. They can also set rules deciding how much rest and sleep time is required, however, these are only a couple of regulations set. Any violations are often subject to harsh penalties. In some cases, there are instruments to track each driver's hours, which are becoming more necessary.

Receiving nation attention during the 1960's and 70's, songs and movies about truck driving were major hits. Finding solidarity, truck drivers participated in widespread strikes. Truck drivers from all over opposed the rising cost of fuel. Not to mention this is during the energy crises of 1873 and 1979. In 1980 the Motor Carrier Act drastically deregulated the trucking industry. Since then trucking has come to dominate the freight industry in the latter part of the 20th century. This coincided with what are now known as 'big-box' stores such as Target or Wal-Mart.

In the United States, the term 'full trailer' is used for a freight trailer supported by front and rear axles and pulled by a drawbar. This term is slightly different in Europe, where a full trailer is known as an A-frame drawbar trail. A full trailer is 96 or 102 in (2.4 or 2.6 m) wide and 35 or 40 ft (11 or 12 m) long.

In 1976, the number one hit on the Billboard chart was "Convoy," a novelty song by C.W. McCall about a convoy of truck drivers evading speed traps and toll booths across America. The song inspired the 1978 action film Convoy directed by Sam Peckinpah. After the film's release, thousands of independent truck drivers went on strike and participated in violent protests during the 1979 energy crisis (although similar strikes had occurred during the 1973 energy crisis).

Another film released in 1975, White Line Fever, also involved truck drivers. It tells the story of a Vietnam War veteran who returns home to take over his father's trucking business. But, he soon finds that corrupt shippers are trying to force him to carry illegal contraband. While endorsing another negative connotation towards the trucking industry, it does portray truck drivers with a certain wanderlust.

In 1971, author and director Steven Spielberg, debuted his first feature length film. His made-for-tv film, Duel, portrayed a truck driver as an anonymous stalker. Apparently there seems to be a trend in the 70's to negatively stigmatize truck drivers.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 40 million United States citizens have moved annually over the last decade. Of those people who have moved in the United States, 84.5% of them have moved within their own state, 12.5% have moved to another state, and 2.3% have moved to another country.

In the United States, a commercial driver's license is required to drive any type of commercial vehicle weighing 26,001 lb (11,794 kg) or more. In 2006 the US trucking industry employed 1.8 million drivers of heavy trucks.

There are certain characteristics of a truck that makes it an "off-road truck". They generally standard, extra heavy-duty highway-legal trucks. Although legal, they have off-road features like front driving axle and special tires for applying it to tasks such as logging and construction. The purpose-built off-road vehicles are unconstrained by weighing limits, such as the Libherr T 282B mining truck.

As we know in the trucking industry, some trailers are part of large trucks, which we call semi-trailer trucks for transportation of cargo. Trailers may also be used in a personal manner as well, whether for personal or small business purposes.

A relatable reality t.v. show to the industry is the show Ice Road Truckers, which premiered season 3 on the History Channel in 2009. The show documents the lives of truck drivers working the scary Dalton Highway in Alaska. Following drivers as they compete to see which one of them can haul the most loads before the end of the season. It'll grab you with its mechanical problems that so many have experienced and as you watch them avoid the pitfalls of dangerous and icy roads!

In the United States, commercial truck classification is fixed by each vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8. Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks. Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS, formerly known as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

Public transportation is vital to a large part of society and is in dire need of work and attention. In 2010, the DOT awarded $742.5 million in funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to 11 transit projects. The awardees specifically focused light rail projects. One includes both a commuter rail extension and a subway project in New York City. The public transportation New York City has to offer is in need of some TLC. Another is working on a rapid bus transit system in Springfield, Oregon. The funds also subsidize a heavy rail project in northern Virginia. This finally completes the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority's Metro Silver Line, connecting to Washington, D.C., and the Washington Dulles International Airport. This is important because the DOT has previously agreed to subsidize the Silver Line construction to Reston, Virginia.

The term "lorry" has an ambiguous origin, but it is likely that its roots were in the rail transport industry. This is where the word is known to have been used in 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage) specifically a large flat wagon. It may derive from the verb lurry, which means to pull or tug, of uncertain origin. It's expanded meaning was much more exciting as "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods", and has been in usage since 1911. Previously, unbeknownst to most, the word "lorry" was used for a fashion of big horse-drawn goods wagon.

Although there are exceptions, city routes are interestingly most often found in the Midwestern area of the United States. Though they essentially serve the same purpose as business routes, they are different. They feature "CITY" signs as opposed to "BUSINESS" signs above or below route shields. Many of these city routes are becoming irrelevant for today's transportation. Due to this, they are being eliminated in favor of the business route designation.

The year of 1977 marked the release of the infamous Smokey and the Bandit. It went on to be the third highest grossing film that year, following tough competitors like Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Burt Reynolds plays the protagonist, or "The Bandit", who escorts "The Snowman" in order to deliver bootleg beer. Reynolds once stated he envisioned trucking as a "hedonistic joyride entirely devoid from economic reality"   Another action film in 1977 also focused on truck drivers, as was the trend it seems. Breaker! Breaker! starring infamous Chuck Norris also focused on truck drivers. They were also displaying movie posters with the catch phrase "... he's got a CB radio and a hundred friends who just might get mad!"

Moving companies that operate within the borders of a particular state are usually regulated by the state DOT. Sometimes the public utility commission in that state will take care of it. This only applies to some of the U.S. states such as in California (California Public Utilities Commission) or Texas (Texas Department of Motor Vehicles. However, no matter what state you are in it is always best to make sure you are compliant with that state

There are various versions of a moving scam, but it basically begins with a prospective client. Then the client starts to contact a moving company to request a cost estimate. In today's market, unfortunately, this often happens online or via phone calls. So essentially a customer is contacting them for a quote when the moving company may not have a license. These moving sales people are salesman prone to quoting sometimes low. Even though usually reasonable prices with no room for the movers to provide a quality service if it is a broker.

Tracing the origins of particular words can be quite different with so many words in the English Dictionary. Some say the word "truck" might have come from a back-formation of "truckle", meaning "small wheel" or "pulley". In turn, both sources emanate from the Greek trokhos (τροχός), meaning "wheel", from trekhein (τρέχειν, "to run").

With the ending of World War I, several developments were made to enhance trucks. Such an example would be by putting pneumatic tires replaced the previously common full rubber versions. These advancements continued, including electric starters, power brakes, 4, 6, and 8 cylinder engines. Closed cabs and electric lighting followed. The modern semi-trailer truck also debuted. Additionally, touring car builders such as Ford and Renault entered the heavy truck market.

In the United States and Canada, the cost for long-distance moves is generally determined by a few factors. The first is the weight of the items to be moved and the distance it will go. Cost is also based on how quickly the items are to be moved, as well as the time of the year or month which the move occurs. In the United Kingdom and Australia, it's quite different. They base price on the volume of the items as opposed to their weight. Keep in mind some movers may offer flat rate pricing.