New Hampshire Movers Top Rated

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67 Movers in New Hampshire

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Justin Cormier

“Fantastic moving service! Will get them again. ”

“Fantastic moving service! Will get them again. ”

United States New Hampshire

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Carlos L.

“From start to finish these movers were fantasti...”

“From start to finish these movers were fantastic, honestly they did the best job!”

United States New Hampshire

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Tanya Hall

“My experience was great to the point that I too...”

“My experience was great to the point that I took an ideal opportunity to compose a short letter to the administration...”

United States New Hampshire

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Carolyn Rayno

“We were exceptionally pleased with the three in...”

“We were exceptionally pleased with the three individuals from McLaughlin's who stacked, transported and delivered our...”

United States New Hampshire

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Nathan Howell

“Able Moving has an incredible history and recor...”

“Able Moving has an incredible history and record of service for me and my clients. Exceptionally reliable and profici...”

United States New Hampshire

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Amber Carnaroli

“Talking with Ken was awesome. He truly thinks a...”

“Talking with Ken was awesome. He truly thinks about his clients. A's Pool Tables went right out and disassembled a ta...”

United States New Hampshire

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Cathy N.

“This was not my first move with the County Pick...”

“This was not my first move with the County Picker. Be that as it may, I it will be last as I have moved fro NH to SC....”

United States New Hampshire

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Don W.

“We used Bridges Bros to move from Portsmouth to...”

“We used Bridges Bros to move from Portsmouth to Biddeford, Maine. They were on time, everyone knew what to do, and th...”

United States New Hampshire

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - angela

“RTK has provided excellent customer service sin...”

“RTK has provided excellent customer service since assuming our account. There has always been prompt response to our...”

United States New Hampshire

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jeremy S

“This is my first time moving and we were extrem...”

“This is my first time moving and we were extremely worried. Had an incredible move, one and only scratch on a work ar...”

United States New Hampshire

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Victor

“Awesome!”

“Awesome!”

United States New Hampshire

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - CAROL L SCHIPPERS

“Hard working-family company. Came out and gave...”

“Hard working-family company. Came out and gave me estimate, then 5 days later moved my belongings from townhouse to ...”

United States New Hampshire

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Becky H

“We employed Mountain Moving to move a fabulous ...”

“We employed Mountain Moving to move a fabulous piano that we had obtained. They were proficient consistently, first t...”

United States New Hampshire

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Catherine L

“We work at a senior group and dependably call o...”

“We work at a senior group and dependably call of Nathan and his gathering! Legitimate, pleasant and dependably puts o...”

United States New Hampshire

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Sean Everett

“My wife and I had an awesome experience with T...”

“My wife and I had an awesome experience with Triple 7 Movers. They saved our day when another moving service cancell...”

United States New Hampshire

Tips On Moving To New Hampshire

When you're finding a state to state moving company, it's important to read interstate New Hampshire moving reviews. We list only the best New Hampshire movers, so it's simple to find a reputable cross country mover. If New Hampshire interstate movers aren't what you need, check local moving company reviews. Moving Authority is here to provide a free moving quote and New Hampshire movers cost estimate. Keep reading! You'll find moving tips, discount relocation rates, and so much more from Moving Authority.

Sometimes, finding the right movers New Hampshire feels more like a challenging puzzle to solve than anything. Movers in NH are everywhere, but it pays to find the highest quality moving company NH boasts. When you're looking for movers NH residents can be of great help. Whichever moving companies NH catch your eye, be sure to compare reviews and rates from other NH moving companies as well.

The best car transport in New Hampshire might not always come from New Hampshire long distance movers. In fact, self-service movers may do more than you think. When you want an American moving company to move your furniture and more, do yourself a favor. Browse through our list of credible New Hampshire moving company reviews so that you can be an informed consumer. When it's time for you to obtain a moving cost estimate, make sure not to stop at just one. The best way to compare prices for local movers, gather as many free moving estimates as possible.


4 Ways To Make Sure You Get Your Security Deposit Back

  • Stains on the wall can be easily removed with a magic eraser.
  • Grab pesky dust bunnies on the floor by wrapping masking tape around a flat broom.
  • Check with your landlord if you have painted the walls to see if you need to repaint.
  • If you have holes in your wall with no time to spackle, you can go over them with chalk or a bar of soap.


Feeling Overwhelmed About Moving? You’re Not Alone.



"Live Free Or Die": How to See New hampshire Like a Local

  • Explore Ruggles Mine in Grafton.
  • Get cultured at the Hood Museum in Hanover.
  • Take a look at the roadside Trojan horse in Epsom.
  • Stand exactly between the Equator and the North Pole at the 45th Parallel in Clarksville.
  • Go wild in the former-zoo-turned-park at Benson’s Park in Hudson.


5 Day Trips from New hampshire You've Got to Take

  • Boston, MA
  • New York, New York
  • Newport, RI
  • Burlington, VT
  • Portland, ME

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Business routes generally follow the original routing of the numbered route through a city or town. Beginning in the 1930s and lasting thru the 1970s was an era marking a peak in large-scale highway construction in the United States. U.S. Highways and Interstates were typically built in particular phases. Their first phase of development began with the numbered route carrying traffic through the center of a city or town. The second phase involved the construction of bypasses around the central business districts of the towns they began. As bypass construction continued, original parts of routes that had once passed straight thru a city would often become a "business route".

With the partial deregulation of the trucking industry in 1980 by the Motor Carrier Act, trucking companies increased. The workforce was drastically de-unionized. As a result, drivers received a lower pay overall. Losing its spotlight in the popular culture, trucking had become less intimate as some unspoken competition broke out. However, the deregulation only increased the competition and productivity with the trucking industry as a whole. This was beneficial to the America consumer by reducing costs. In 1982 the Surface Transportation Assistance Act established a federal minimum truck weight limits. Thus, trucks were finally standardized truck size and weight limits across the country. This was also put in to place so that across country traffic on the Interstate Highways resolved the issue of the 'barrier states'.

Trailer stability can be defined as the tendency of a trailer to dissipate side-to-side motion. The initial motion may be caused by aerodynamic forces, such as from a cross wind or a passing vehicle. One common criterion for stability is the center of mass location with respect to the wheels, which can usually be detected by tongue weight. If the center of mass of the trailer is behind its wheels, therefore having a negative tongue weight, the trailer will likely be unstable. Another parameter which is less commonly a factor is the trailer moment of inertia. Even if the center of mass is forward of the wheels, a trailer with a long load, and thus large moment of inertia, may be unstable.

Popular among campers is the use of lightweight trailers, such as aerodynamic trailers. These can be towed by a small car, such as the BMW Air Camper. They are built with the intent to lower the tow of the vehicle, thus minimizing drag.

AMSA wanted to help consumers avoid untrustworthy or illegitimate movers. In January 2008, AMSA created the ProMover certification program for its members. As a member, you must have federal interstate operating authority. Members are also required to pass an annual criminal back check, be licensed by the FMCSA, and agree to abide by ethical standards. This would include honesty in advertising and in business transaction with customers. Each must also sign a contract committing to adhere to applicable Surface Transportation Board and FMCSA regulations. AMSA also takes into consideration and examines ownership. They are very strict, registration with state corporation commissions. This means that the mover must maintain at least a satisfactory rating with the Better Business Bureau (BBB). As one can imagine, those that pass are authorized to display the ProMove logo on the websites and in marketing materials. However, those that fail will be expelled from the program (and AMSA) if they cannot correct discrepancies during probation.

Without strong land use controls, buildings are too often built in town right along a bypass. This results with the conversion of it into an ordinary town road, resulting in the bypass becoming as congested as the local streets. On the contrary, a bypass is intended to avoid such local street congestion. Gas stations, shopping centers, along with various other businesses are often built alongside them. They are built in hopes of easing accessibility, while home are ideally avoided for noise reasons.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) is an influential association as an advocate for transportation. Setting important standards, they are responsible for publishing specifications, test protocols, and guidelines. All which are used in highway design and construction throughout the United States. Despite its name, the association represents more than solely highways. Alongside highways, they focus on air, rail, water, and public transportation as well.

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.   The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

As the American Interstate Highway System began to expand in the 1950's, the trucking industry began to take over a large market share. That is, a large share of the transportation of goods throughout the country. Before this era, trains had been relied on to transport the bulk of the goods cross country or state to state. The Interstate Highway System was influential as it allows for merchandise to travel door to door with ease. Since then, truckload carriers have taken advantage of the interstate system, especially when performing a long distance move. Typically, they bring the merchandise from one distribution center of the country to another part of the country. The increase in truckload freight transportation has reduced the time it takes to transport the goods. Whether the freight was manufactured or produced for the different areas internationally, the time it takes to transport goods has decreased dramatically.  

The basics of all trucks are not difficult, as they share common construction. They are generally made of chassis, a cab, an area for placing cargo or equipment, axles, suspension, road wheels, and engine and a drive train. Pneumatic, hydraulic, water, and electrical systems may also be present. Many also tow one or more trailers or semi-trailers, which also vary in multiple ways but are similar as well.

The Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways is most commonly known as the Interstate Highway System, Interstate Freeway System, Interstate System, or simply the Interstate. It is a network of controlled-access highways that forms a part of the National Highway System of the United States. Named after President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who endorsed its formation, the idea was to have portable moving and storage. Construction was authorized by the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956. The original portion was completed 35 years later, although some urban routes were canceled and never built. The network has since been extended and, as of 2013, it had a total length of 47,856 miles (77,017 km), making it the world's second longest after China's. As of 2013, about one-quarter of all vehicle miles driven in the country use the Interstate system. In 2006, the cost of construction had been estimated at about $425 billion (equivalent to $511 billion in 2015).

The FMCSA has established rules to maintain and regulate the safety of the trucking industry. According to FMCSA rules, driving a goods-carrying CMV more than 11 hours or to drive after having been on duty for 14 hours, is illegal. Due to such heavy driving, they need a break to complete other tasks such as loading and unloading cargo, stopping for gas and other required vehicle inspections, as well as non-working duties such as meal and rest breaks. The 3-hour difference between the 11-hour driving limit and 14 hour on-duty limit gives drivers time to take care of such duties. In addition, after completing an 11 to 14 hour on duty period, the driver much be allowed 10 hours off-duty.

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a division of the USDOT specializing in highway transportation. The agency's major influential activities are generally separated into two different "programs". The first is the Federal-aid Highway Program. This provides financial aid to support the construction, maintenance, and operation of the U.S. highway network. The second program, the Federal Lands Highway Program, shares a similar name with different intentions. The purpose of this program is to improve transportation involving Federal and Tribal lands. They also focus on preserving "national treasures" for the historic and beatific enjoyment for all.

A circumferential route refers to a public transportation system that follows the route in the shape of a circle. Over time a nickname developed in the European Union, calling transportation networks such as these a "ring road". This is no surprise as Europe has several famous "ring roads" such as the Berliner Ring, the Brussels Ring, the Amsterdam Ring, the Boulevard Périphérique around Paris and the Leeds Inner and Outer ring roads. Other countries adopted the term as well which in turn made the name go international. Australia's Melbourne's Western Ring Road and India's Hyderabad's Outer Ring Road both adopted the name. However in Canada, the term is most commonly used, with "orbital" used to a much lesser extent.   On the contrary, the United States calls many "ring roads" as belt-lines, beltways, or loops instead. For example, the Capital Beltway around Washington, D.C. Some ring roads use terminology such as "Inner Loop" and "Outer Loop". This is, of course, for the sake of directional sense, since compass directions cannot be determined around the entire loop.

Business routes generally follow the original routing of the numbered route through a city or town. Beginning in the 1930s and lasting thru the 1970s was an era marking a peak in large-scale highway construction in the United States. U.S. Highways and Interstates were typically built in particular phases. Their first phase of development began with the numbered route carrying traffic through the center of a city or town. The second phase involved the construction of bypasses around the central business districts of the towns they began. As bypass construction continued, original parts of routes that had once passed straight thru a city would often become a "business route".

Throughout the United States, bypass routes are a special type of route most commonly used on an alternative routing of a highway around a town. Specifically when the main route of the highway goes through the town. Originally, these routes were designated as "truck routes" as a means to divert trucking traffic away from towns. However, this name was later changed by AASHTO in 1959 to what we now call a "bypass". Many "truck routes" continue to remain regardless that the mainline of the highway prohibits trucks.

The Federal-Aid Highway Amendments of 1974 established a federal maximum gross vehicle weight of 80,000 pounds (36,000 kg). It also introduced a sliding scale of truck weight-to-length ratios based on the bridge formula. Although, they did not establish a federal minimum weight limit. By failing to establish a federal regulation, six contiguous in the Mississippi Valley rebelled. Becoming known as the "barrier state", they refused to increase their Interstate weight limits to 80,000 pounds. Due to this, the trucking industry faced a barrier to efficient cross-country interstate commerce.

Moving companies that operate within the borders of a particular state are usually regulated by the state DOT. Sometimes the public utility commission in that state will take care of it. This only applies to some of the U.S. states such as in California (California Public Utilities Commission) or Texas (Texas Department of Motor Vehicles. However, no matter what state you are in it is always best to make sure you are compliant with that state

Tracing the origins of particular words can be quite different with so many words in the English Dictionary. Some say the word "truck" might have come from a back-formation of "truckle", meaning "small wheel" or "pulley". In turn, both sources emanate from the Greek trokhos (τροχός), meaning "wheel", from trekhein (τρέχειν, "to run").

Many people are familiar with this type of moving, using truck rental services, or borrowing similar hardware, is known as DIY moving. Whoever is renting a truck or trailer large enough to carry their household goods may obtain moving equipment if necessary. Equipment may be items such as dollies, furniture pads, and cargo belts to protect furniture and to ease the moving process.