Missouri Movers Top Rated

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184 Movers in Missouri

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Eva T.

The movers likewise appeared on time and went well beyond to offer assistance. They took a great deal of pride in their work and the greater part of my furniture was conveyed in place with NO harm. This was the best moving team I've encountered (this was my fifth long move). Cost out alternate folks on the off chance that you need yet stay with realities and positive audits, this organization is A+

United States Missouri

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jamie Thomas

This was the worse experience ever. Said that they would deliver on Saturday. They ended up coming on Wednesday night. Scratches on my furniture . Missing my office chair and iPad. Please refrain from using this company.

United States Missouri

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States Missouri

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States Missouri

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States Missouri

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Kristi S.

Try not to utilize this moving Company. The main thing that turned out badly was the proprietor did not have me planned for the right day. Upon the arrival of my turn, I needed to call and ask him where his group was. They were assume to arrive at 9:00 am however did not appear until 11:20 am. The proprietor did not give me a rebate for his misstep. After the move, I found some gems and coins missing. When I reported it to the proprietor, he was not exceptionally supportive. I will never utilize this organization again. In the event that you choose to utilize this organization, be cautious.

United States Missouri

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States Missouri

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jeremy R

I need to say these folks were genuine experts. From the workplace staff getting the agreement to us and their subsequent meet-up helping us move from house to well-suited to capacity. It was pouring precipitation and these folks made an incredible showing, utilized their time carefully and were "reasonable". This moving company was straightforward and would prescribe conversing with Daniel and his group. Awesome employment folks!

United States Missouri

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States Missouri

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States Missouri

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States Missouri

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States Missouri

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Stasha R.

I couldn't have had a superior moving background! were they the least expensive as well as they were super neighborly. they addressed the majority of my imbecilic inquiries and required some serious energy out to help me. i'm def going to utilize them once more!

United States Missouri

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - CAROL L SCHIPPERS

Hard working-family company. Came out and gave me estimate, then 5 days later moved my belongings from townhouse to a house 30 min away. Quote was exactly right on time needed, and rate was very reasonable. Very happy with the move and would use them again.

United States Missouri

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Becky H

We employed Mountain Moving to move a fabulous piano that we had obtained. They were proficient consistently, first telephone call to the completed conveyance. It took around 3 hours for them to move the piano (dismantling it, stacking it, transporting it, emptying it, and setting it move down). They took care of the piano with amazing care and put it precisely where we inquired. I would most unquestionably contract them again and have as of now prescribed them to others.

United States Missouri

Secrets to Finding the Perfect Missouri Moving Company

You can find the best state to state moving company on our list of Mississippi interstate movers. For customers moving within Mississippi, browse our local moving company reviews. When you're ready for a Mississippi movers cost estimate, get a free quote in minutes with our online quote generator. Whether you need a cross country mover or a local one, we're here to help.

The easiest way to find a reliable American moving company is to obtain a moving cost estimate. You can get free moving estimates for Missouri long distance movers, local movers, and self service movers right here on Moving Authority. Whether you want to move your furniture or you want the best car transport in Missouri, we're here to help. Have a look at Missouri moving reviews to find the best company for you.


3 Rookie Mistakes You Should Never Make With Movers

  • Signing the Contract Before Understanding It. It may feel overwhelming to ask questions about every little detail of the contract, especially if a mover who knows the contract like the back of his hand is pressuring you to sign. Stand your ground and ask for an explanation on everything. That could save you tons of money!
  • No On-Site Estimate. If you get a quote online or over the phone, this is really only a ballpark estimate. When an estimator comes out to examine your moving space firsthand, only then can you receive a binding quote.
  • Paying Too Little. This may sound counterintuitive, because you are going to want the best price for moving companies in Missouri. However, if the amount you're being charged is shockingly low, this is a giant red flag that perhaps you've got a rogue mover.




Labeling Your Boxes is Much More Important Than You Think


4 Different Categories of Moving to MO, Simplified

  • A Residential Relocation. If you are going from one home to another while moving to Missouri, this type of move is residential.
  • A Commercial Relocation. Moving your place of business from one place to another, or expanding into another separate location, is considered a commercial move.
  • A Long Distance Relocation. If your move to Missouri is not confined to the local area, this is a long distance move. This can mean that you're moving a few hours away, a few states away, or even to the other side of the country entirely.
  • An International Relocation. If your relocation crosses a border into another nation, this is an international move. Additionally, moves to Alaska and Hawaii are considered international moves (despite their respective statehoods) due to their place outside of the US mainland.



Kansas City Through the Eyes of a Local

  • Get BBQ at Joe’s Kansas City, but get there 30 minutes before they open to stand at the front of the line!
  • Indulge your artistic senses at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.
  • Get some local goods from the open air City Market.
  • Enjoy local jazz music and the majesty of the classic fountains at the Crown Center.

Do you know?

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Light trucks are classified this way because they are car-sized, yet in the U.S. they can be no more than 6,300 kg (13,900 lb). These are used by not only used by individuals but also businesses as well. In the UK they may not weigh more than 3,500 kg (7,700 lb) and are authorized to drive with a driving license for cars. Pickup trucks, popular in North America, are most seen in North America and some regions of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Although Europe doesn't seem to follow this trend, where the size of the commercial vehicle is most often made as vans.

The trucking industry has made a large historical impact since the early 20th century. It has affected the U.S. both politically as well as economically since the notion has begun. Previous to the invention of automobiles, most freight was moved by train or horse-drawn carriage. Trucks were first exclusively used by the military during World War I.   After the war, construction of paved roads increased. As a result, trucking began to achieve significant popularity by the 1930's. Soon after trucking became subject to various government regulation, such as the hours of service. During the later 1950's and 1960's, trucking accelerated due to the construction of the Interstate Highway System. The Interstate Highway System is an extensive network of freeways linking major cities cross country.

Trucks and cars have much in common mechanically as well as ancestrally. One link between them is the steam-powered fardier Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot, who built it in 1769. Unfortunately for him, steam trucks were not really common until the mid 1800's. While looking at this practically, it would be much harder to have a steam truck. This is mostly due to the fact that the roads of the time were built for horse and carriages. Steam trucks were left to very short hauls, usually from a factory to the nearest railway station. In 1881, the first semi-trailer appeared, and it was in fact towed by a steam tractor manufactured by De Dion-Bouton. Steam-powered trucks were sold in France and in the United States, apparently until the eve of World War I. Also, at the beginning of World War II in the United Kingdom, they were known as 'steam wagons'.

In 1978 Sylvester Stallone starred in the film "F.I.S.T.". The story is loosely based on the 'Teamsters Union'. This union is a labor union which includes truck drivers as well as its then president, Jimmy Hoffa.

A relatable reality t.v. show to the industry is the show Ice Road Truckers, which premiered season 3 on the History Channel in 2009. The show documents the lives of truck drivers working the scary Dalton Highway in Alaska. Following drivers as they compete to see which one of them can haul the most loads before the end of the season. It'll grab you with its mechanical problems that so many have experienced and as you watch them avoid the pitfalls of dangerous and icy roads!

In the United States, commercial truck classification is fixed by each vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8. Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks. Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS, formerly known as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is an agency within the United States Department of Transportation. The purpose of the FMCSA is to regulate safety within the trucking and moving industry in the United States. The FMCSA enforces safety precautions that reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities involving large trucks and buses.

DOT officers of each state are generally in charge of the enforcement of the Hours of Service (HOS). These are sometimes checked when CMVs pass through weigh stations. Drivers found to be in violation of the HOS can be forced to stop driving for a certain period of time. This, in turn, may negatively affect the motor carrier's safety rating. Requests to change the HOS are a source of debate. Unfortunately, many surveys indicate drivers routinely get away with violating the HOS. Such facts have started yet another debate on whether motor carriers should be required to us EOBRs in their vehicles. Relying on paper-based log books does not always seem to enforce the HOS law put in place for the safety of everyone.

The FMCSA is a well-known division of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). It is generally responsible for the enforcement of FMCSA regulations. The driver of a CMV must keep a record of working hours via a log book. This record must reflect the total number of hours spent driving and resting, as well as the time at which the change of duty status occurred. In place of a log book, a motor carrier may choose to keep track of their hours using an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR). This automatically records the amount of time spent driving the vehicle.

The term "lorry" has an ambiguous origin, but it is likely that its roots were in the rail transport industry. This is where the word is known to have been used in 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage) specifically a large flat wagon. It may derive from the verb lurry, which means to pull or tug, of uncertain origin. It's expanded meaning was much more exciting as "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods", and has been in usage since 1911. Previously, unbeknownst to most, the word "lorry" was used for a fashion of big horse-drawn goods wagon.

The word cargo is in reference to particular goods that are generally used for commercial gain. Cargo transportation is generally meant to mean by ship, boat, or plane. However, the term now applies to all types of freight, now including goods carried by train, van, or truck. This term is now used in the case of goods in the cold-chain, as perishable inventory is always cargo in transport towards its final home. Even when it is held in climate-controlled facilities, it is important to remember perishable goods or inventory have a short life.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) issues Hours of Service regulations. At the same time, they govern the working hours of anyone operating a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in the United States. Such regulations apply to truck drivers, commercial and city bus drivers, and school bus drivers who operate CMVs. With these rules in place, the number of daily and weekly hours spent driving and working is limited. The FMCSA regulates the minimum amount of time drivers must spend resting between driving shifts. In regards to intrastate commerce, the respective state's regulations apply.

In 1893, the Office of Road Inquiry (ORI) was established as an organization. However, in 1905 the name was changed to the Office Public Records (OPR). The organization then went on to become a division of the United States Department of Agriculture. As seen throughout history, organizations seem incapable of maintaining permanent names. So, the organization's name was changed three more times, first in 1915 to the Bureau of Public Roads and again in 1939 to the Public Roads Administration (PRA). Yet again, the name was later shifted to the Federal Works Agency, although it was abolished in 1949. Finally, in 1949, the name reverted to the Bureau of Public Roads, falling under the Department of Commerce. With so many name changes, it can be difficult to keep up to date with such organizations. This is why it is most important to research and educate yourself on such matters.

Released in 1998, the film Black Dog featured Patrick Swayze as a truck driver who made it out of prison. However, his life of crime continued, as he was manipulated into the transportation of illegal guns. Writer Scott Doviak has described the movie as a "high-octane riff on White Line Fever" as well as "a throwback to the trucker movies of the 70s".

The 1950's were quite different than the years to come. They were more likely to be considered "Knights of the Road", if you will, for helping stranded travelers. In these times truck drivers were envied and were viewed as an opposition to the book "The Organization Man". Bestseller in 1956, author William H. Whyte's novel describes "the man in the gray flannel suit", who sat in an office every day. He's describing a typical office style job that is very structured with managers watching over everyone. Truck drivers represented the opposite of all these concepts. Popular trucking songs glorified the life of drivers as independent "wanderers". Yet, there were attempts to bring back the factory style efficiency, such as using tachnographs. Although most attempts resulted in little success. Drivers routinely sabotaged and discovered new ways to falsify the machine's records.

The year of 1977 marked the release of the infamous Smokey and the Bandit. It went on to be the third highest grossing film that year, following tough competitors like Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Burt Reynolds plays the protagonist, or "The Bandit", who escorts "The Snowman" in order to deliver bootleg beer. Reynolds once stated he envisioned trucking as a "hedonistic joyride entirely devoid from economic reality"   Another action film in 1977 also focused on truck drivers, as was the trend it seems. Breaker! Breaker! starring infamous Chuck Norris also focused on truck drivers. They were also displaying movie posters with the catch phrase "... he's got a CB radio and a hundred friends who just might get mad!"

Ultra light trucks are very easy to spot or acknowledge if you are paying attention. They are often produced variously such as golf cars, for instance, it has internal combustion or a battery electric drive. They usually for off-highway use on estates, golf courses, parks, in stores, or even someone in an electric wheelchair. While clearly not suitable for highway usage, some variations may be licensed as slow speed vehicles. The catch is that they may on operate on streets, usually a body variation of a neighborhood electric vehicle. A few manufacturers produce specialized chassis for this type of vehicle. Meanwhile, Zap Motors markets a version of the xebra electric tricycle. Which, believe it or not, is able to attain a general license in the United States as a motorcycle.

The industry intends to both consumers as well as moving companies, this is why there are Ministers of Transportation in the industry. They are there to set and maintain laws and regulations in place to create a safer environment. It offers its members professional service training and states the time that movers have been in existence. It also provides them with federal government representation and statistical industry reporting. Additionally, there are arbitration services for lost or damaged claims, publications, public relations, and annual tariff updates and awards. This site includes articles as well that give some direction, a quarterly data summary, and industry trends.

Words have always had a different meaning or have been used interchangeably with others across all cultures. In the United States, Canada, and the Philippines the word "truck" is mostly reserved for larger vehicles. Although in Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa, the word "truck" is generally reserved for large vehicles. In Australia and New Zealand, a pickup truck is usually called a ute, short for "utility". While over in South Africa it is called a bakkie (Afrikaans: "small open container"). The United Kingdom, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Ireland, and Hong Kong use the "lorry" instead of truck, but only for medium and heavy types.

There many reasons for moving, each one with a unique and specific reason as to why. Relocation services, employee relocation, or workforce mobility can create a range of processes. This process of transferring employees, their families, and/or entire departments of a business to a new location can be difficult. Like some types of employee benefits, these matters are dealt with by human resources specialists within a corporation.