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United States Maryland

LAST REVIEW

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 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States Maryland

The Best Maryland Movers, See Below

Moving companies in Maryland are everywhere. How do you know when you're choosing the right local movers Maryland has to offer? When looking for the top professional movers Maryland boasts, it's good to know how movers in Maryland are ranked. All the residential movers Maryland has will outshine office movers in Maryland. That doesn't mean those office movers Maryland are nonexistent. Moving companies in MD offer services at every level. Local movers in Maryland cover the towns that are the closest, whereas a long distance moving company in MD takes care of longer relocations.

We have interstate Maryland moving reviews to help you scout out the top Maryland interstate movers. Additionally, we have local moving company reviews, which makes it a snap to find the best Maryland movers. Make sure to get a free moving quote from our online quote generator, which will reveal a Maryland movers cost estimate. You'll be able to decipher discount relocation rates for the best Maryland priced movers. Keep reading! Moving Authority is your place for moving tips, relocation checklists, and guides to make the process smoother.

Finding a trustworthy American moving company isn't as difficult as you may think. With an abundance of Maryland moving company reviews, you can find local movers and self-service movers to move your furniture with ease. But what about Maryland long distance movers? If you're looking for free moving estimates on longer journeys with the best car transport in Maryland, look no further. Get a moving cost estimate today from Moving Authority, completely free of charge. You'll be on your way to a smooth move in no time.

The Price Is Right: HOW TO BUDGET FLAWLESSLY FOR YOUR MOVE

  • First things first: check your bank account. The money you have on hand and in savings won’t magically increase, so your expectations need to be in line with how much you can realistically spend so that you have a safe amount left over.
  • Once you determine how much money you can spare for your move, you need to assess the amount of moving services MD you need. Are you just one person moving? A whole family? A small business? Knowing the level of service you require will help you find a moving company Maryland has on offer to suit your needs.
  • Next up: look at the distance between Point A and Point B.  Are you staying local? Moving from coast to coast? Understanding how far your movers need to go and the time it will take is essential to nailing down an option to fit your price range.
  • Okay, so you’ve identified your price point, the services you need, the distance you’re moving; now you need to research moving companies in the area. Here at Moving Authority, we connect customers with movers all over the USA, as well as provide reviews written by previous customers so that you can know exactly how a moving company operates.
  • Allow a little bit of wiggle room in your budget. You never know when a surprise expense will pop up, and the only way to be prepared for these types of surprises is to be flexible.


4 Secret Spots in Maryland You Have to See For Yourself

  • Betterton Beach—Betterton
  • Lilypons Water Gardens, Adamstown
  • South Mountain Creamery—Middletown
  • Vintage Red Barn—Fulton




Where to Take Kids in Baltimore for the Best Day Ever

  • Terrapin Adventures: from zip lining to climbing towers, your kids will love to run around here.
  • Great Wolf Lodge: rain or shine, this indoor waterpark will make a splash with the kids.
  • Ripley’s Believe It Or not: people of all ages will be astounded by the facts in this branch of the world’s quirkiest museums.
  • Maryland Science Center: your kids will expand their minds while having fun!

3 UNEXPECTED THOUGHTS DURING A MOVE — And How To Combat Them

  • “This will take forever.” If you’re looking at all your stuff and wondering how in the world you’ll get everything sorted and packed in time, don’t stress. If you feel anxiety, the task at hand will feel even more arduous. Do yourself a favor and think of sorting all your things as a fun way to look back at memories. Involve your partner, your family, or your friends and reminisce about all the times you’ve had together with the stuff you’re processing. This way, it doesn’t seem like such a burden to sift through everything you own.
  • “I have ALL THIS stuff?!” Now that you’ve gone through all your things, had some laughs, maybe shed some tears, it’s time to decide what you want to keep and what you want to discard. Memories are priceless, so anything that feels like a part of you should be kept. If you haven’t used an item in 6-12 months, it’s a safe bet that you don’t need it. If you’re still unable to part with a lot of your stuff but you don’t want to move it with you, do yourself a favor and look into storage options with the moving company you choose. This way, you get the best of both worlds: a streamlined move as well as the ability to visit your extra stuff and walk down memory lane anytime you want.
  • “Moving is expensive!” Yes, moving companies MD can cost a lot upfront, but it’s best to look at the big picture when you’re surprised at the cost of your move. Usually, when a person relocates, it’s for a financially lucrative reason (promotion, moving in with a partner, etc). The money you pay for Maryland movers is generally an investment in whatever fiscal advantage you’re setting up for yourself later on.

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A relatable reality t.v. show to the industry is the show Ice Road Truckers, which premiered season 3 on the History Channel in 2009. The show documents the lives of truck drivers working the scary Dalton Highway in Alaska. Following drivers as they compete to see which one of them can haul the most loads before the end of the season. It'll grab you with its mechanical problems that so many have experienced and as you watch them avoid the pitfalls of dangerous and icy roads!

In 1895 Karl Benz designed and built the first truck in history by using the internal combustion engine. Later that year some of Benz's trucks gave into modernization and went on to become the first bus by the Netphener. This would be the first motor bus company in history. Hardly a year later, in 1986, another internal combustion engine truck was built by a man named Gottlieb Daimler. As people began to catch on, other companies, such as Peugeot, Renault, and Bussing, also built their own versions. In 1899, the first truck in the United States was built by Autocar and was available with two optional horsepower motors, 5 or 8.

In 1999, The Simpsons episode Maximum Homerdrive aired. It featured Homer and Bart making a delivery for a truck driver named Red after he unexpectedly dies of 'food poisoning'.

In 1971, author and director Steven Spielberg, debuted his first feature length film. His made-for-tv film, Duel, portrayed a truck driver as an anonymous stalker. Apparently there seems to be a trend in the 70's to negatively stigmatize truck drivers.

The year 1611 marked an important time for trucks, as that is when the word originated. The usage of "truck" referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. Further extending its usage in 1771, it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads. In 1916 it became shortened, calling it a "motor truck". While since the 1930's its expanded application goes as far as to say "motor-powered load carrier".

A semi-trailer is almost exactly what it sounds like, it is a trailer without a front axle. Proportionally, its weight is supported by two factors. The weight falls upon a road tractor or by a detachable front axle assembly, known as a dolly. Generally, a semi-trailer is equipped with legs, known in the industry as "landing gear". This means it can be lowered to support it when it is uncoupled. In the United States, a trailer may not exceed a length of 57 ft (17.37 m) on interstate highways. However, it is possible to link two smaller trailers together to reach a length of 63 ft (19.20 m).

Business routes always have the same number as the routes they parallel. For example, U.S. 1 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, U.S. Route 1, and Interstate 40 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, Interstate 40.

Signage of business routes varies, depending on the type of route they are derived from. Business routes paralleling U.S. and state highways usually have exactly the same shield shapes and nearly the same overall appearance as the routes they parallel, with a rectangular plate reading "BUSINESS" placed above the shield (either supplementing or replacing the directional plate, depending on the preference of the road agency). In order to better identify and differentiate alternate routes from the routes they parallel, some states such as Maryland are beginning to use green shields for business routes off U.S. highways. In addition, Maryland uses a green shield for business routes off state highways with the word "BUSINESS" in place of "MARYLAND" is used for a state route.

The FMCSA is a well-known division of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). It is generally responsible for the enforcement of FMCSA regulations. The driver of a CMV must keep a record of working hours via a log book. This record must reflect the total number of hours spent driving and resting, as well as the time at which the change of duty status occurred. In place of a log book, a motor carrier may choose to keep track of their hours using an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR). This automatically records the amount of time spent driving the vehicle.

The Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula is a mathematical formula used in the United States to determine the appropriate gross weight for a long distance moving vehicle, based on the axle number and spacing. Enforced by the Department of Transportation upon long-haul truck drivers, it is used as a means of preventing heavy vehicles from damaging roads and bridges. This is especially in particular to the total weight of a loaded truck, whether being used for commercial moving services or for long distance moving services in general.   According to the Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula, the total weight of a loaded truck (tractor and trailer, 5-axle rig) cannot exceed 80,000 lbs in the United States. Under ordinary circumstances, long-haul equipment trucks will weight about 15,000 kg (33,069 lbs). This leaves about 20,000 kg (44,092 lbs) of freight capacity. Likewise, a load is limited to the space available in the trailer, normally with dimensions of 48 ft (14.63 m) or 53 ft (16.15 m) long, 2.6 m (102.4 in) wide, 2.7 m (8 ft 10.3 in) high and 13 ft 6 in or 4.11 m high.

Full truckload carriers normally deliver a semi-trailer to a shipper who will fill the trailer with freight for one destination. Once the trailer is filled, the driver returns to the shipper to collect the required paperwork. Upon receiving the paperwork the driver will then leave with the trailer containing freight. Next, the driver will proceed to the consignee and deliver the freight him or herself. At times, a driver will transfer the trailer to another driver who will drive the freight the rest of the way. Full Truckload service (FTL) transit times are generally restricted by the driver's availability. This is according to Hours of Service regulations and distance. It is typically accepted that Full Truckload carriers will transport freight at an average rate of 47 miles per hour. This includes traffic jams, queues at intersections, other factors that influence transit time.  

As the American Interstate Highway System began to expand in the 1950's, the trucking industry began to take over a large market share. That is, a large share of the transportation of goods throughout the country. Before this era, trains had been relied on to transport the bulk of the goods cross country or state to state. The Interstate Highway System was influential as it allows for merchandise to travel door to door with ease. Since then, truckload carriers have taken advantage of the interstate system, especially when performing a long distance move. Typically, they bring the merchandise from one distribution center of the country to another part of the country. The increase in truckload freight transportation has reduced the time it takes to transport the goods. Whether the freight was manufactured or produced for the different areas internationally, the time it takes to transport goods has decreased dramatically.  

The main purpose of the HOS regulation is to prevent accidents due to driver fatigue. To do this, the number of driving hours per day, as well as the number of driving hours per week, have been limited. Another measure to prevent fatigue is to keep drivers on a 21 to 24-hour schedule in order to maintain a natural sleep/wake cycle. Drivers must take a daily minimum period of rest and are allowed longer "weekend" rest periods. This is in hopes to combat cumulative fatigue effects that accrue on a weekly basis.

The 1950's were quite different than the years to come. They were more likely to be considered "Knights of the Road", if you will, for helping stranded travelers. In these times truck drivers were envied and were viewed as an opposition to the book "The Organization Man". Bestseller in 1956, author William H. Whyte's novel describes "the man in the gray flannel suit", who sat in an office every day. He's describing a typical office style job that is very structured with managers watching over everyone. Truck drivers represented the opposite of all these concepts. Popular trucking songs glorified the life of drivers as independent "wanderers". Yet, there were attempts to bring back the factory style efficiency, such as using tachnographs. Although most attempts resulted in little success. Drivers routinely sabotaged and discovered new ways to falsify the machine's records.

The year of 1977 marked the release of the infamous Smokey and the Bandit. It went on to be the third highest grossing film that year, following tough competitors like Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Burt Reynolds plays the protagonist, or "The Bandit", who escorts "The Snowman" in order to deliver bootleg beer. Reynolds once stated he envisioned trucking as a "hedonistic joyride entirely devoid from economic reality"   Another action film in 1977 also focused on truck drivers, as was the trend it seems. Breaker! Breaker! starring infamous Chuck Norris also focused on truck drivers. They were also displaying movie posters with the catch phrase "... he's got a CB radio and a hundred friends who just might get mad!"

With the onset of trucking culture, truck drivers often became portrayed as protagonists in popular media. Author Shane Hamilton, who wrote "Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy", focuses on truck driving. He explores the history of trucking and while connecting it development in the trucking industry. It is important to note, as Hamilton discusses the trucking industry and how it helps the so-called big-box stores dominate the U.S. marketplace. Hamilton certainly takes an interesting perspective historically speaking.

The most basic purpose of a trailer jack is to lift the trailer to a height that allows the trailer to hitch or unhitch to and from the towing vehicle. Trailer jacks may also be used for the leveling of the trailer during storage. To list a few common types of trailer jacks are A-frame jacks, swivel jacks, and drop-leg jacks. Other trailers, such as horse trailers, have a built-in jack at the tongue for this purpose.

A Ministry of Transport (or) Transportation is responsible for transportation within a country. Administration usually falls upon the Minister for Transport. The term may also be applied to the departments or other government agencies administering transport in a nation who do not use ministers. There are various and vast responsibilities for agencies to oversee such as road safety. Others may include civil aviation, maritime transport, rail transport and so on. They continue to develop government transportation policy and organize public transit. All while trying to maintain and construct infrastructural projects. Some ministries have additional responsibilities in related policy areas as mentioned above.

Tracing the origins of particular words can be quite different with so many words in the English Dictionary. Some say the word "truck" might have come from a back-formation of "truckle", meaning "small wheel" or "pulley". In turn, both sources emanate from the Greek trokhos (τροχός), meaning "wheel", from trekhein (τρέχειν, "to run").

With the ending of World War I, several developments were made to enhance trucks. Such an example would be by putting pneumatic tires replaced the previously common full rubber versions. These advancements continued, including electric starters, power brakes, 4, 6, and 8 cylinder engines. Closed cabs and electric lighting followed. The modern semi-trailer truck also debuted. Additionally, touring car builders such as Ford and Renault entered the heavy truck market.

The Department of Transportation (DOT) is the most common government agency that is devoted to transportation in the United States. The DOT is the largest United States agency with the sole purpose of overseeing interstate travel and issue's USDOT Number filing to new carriers. The U.S., Canadian provinces, and many other local agencies have a similar organization in place. This way they can provide enforcement through DOT officers within their respective jurisdictions.