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Find A Trustworthy Georgia Moving Company

The art of spotting the top moving companies Georgia isn't always easy to master. It takes a lot of know-how about the moving industry to know how moving companies GA operate. This can be problematic if you've only moved a few times in your lifetime. Yet, here at Moving Authority, we'll bridge the gap between you and quality movers Georgia

Looking for some awesome Atlanta Movers? Education is the key to the best Georgia moving companies. This is also true for discount relocation rates. It's complicated to make a move. Local distance moving company reviews and interstate Georgia moving reviews are helpful. The surefire way to find the best cross country move is to get a free moving quote from what you learn here. This will give you a Georgia movers cost estimate on the best Georgia movers. But the cost for the best Georgia priced movers isn't limited to moving within Georgia. Georgia interstate movers can get the job done if you need a state to state moving company. Keep reading for expert moving tips, checklists, and guides.


Think You Have a ROGUE MOVER? Ask Yourself These Questions.

  • Are they licensed and insured? Check with the FMCSA and the USDOT, as well as the ratings right here at Moving Authority.
  • Have your movers in Georgia explained the charges in detail before you sign the contract?
  • Have previous customers rated this company well?
  • Do the movers in GA seem knowledgeable about the nuances of the moving industry?
  • Does the moving company Georgia have a tariff available for you to see?
  • Are the movers in uniform, energetic, and clean-cut? Lack of professionalism is a sign that you could have a rogue mover on your hands and not a quote mover

Confused About Moving Companies in GA? Check Out These 4 Types.



4 Things You Wouldn’t Believe Can IMPACT YOUR MOVING PRICE

  • Time of the year. Most moves movers will do happen between the months of May and August. When you are planning your relocation, do your best to be flexible. This way, you can take advantage of off-season discounts.
  • Day of the week. If you want a deeply discounted rate, book moving services for a time during the workweek. Moves usually happen on the weekends. Because of this, moving companies are more likely to offer a nice price for the unpopular days of the week to move.
  • Stairs or elevators. If your movers GA have to use stairs or elevators at any point during the move, you'll see an extra fee on your contract.
  • Walking more than 75 feet. If the distance from the moving space to the moving truck is over 75 feet, moving company charges a “long carry fee.” Do what you can to avoid this preventable charge!


Your Next Move: What Steps to Take Before the Big Day

  • Handle the administrative tasks. Don't forget about transferring utilities, changing your address, and updating your bank accounts. Make sure that you arrange to forward your mail to the new address sooner rather than later. You can do this step online via the United States Postal Service or at any post office.
  • Provide the materials. You’ll need boxes and a lot of them. You can pay for top-quality materials, and you can also find many free moving boxes that will get the job done. Along with boxes, you will need strong packing tape, as well as quality filler materials. Moving companies in Georgia will sometimes supply these, but for a fee.
  • Safety first. Be sure to check that all locks work and that windows close in your new place. Also, make sure that the locks have been changed since the previous person lived there. Change the locks yourself if you feel that your new place isn’t secure. The last thing you want when you’re settling in is for someone to have access to your personal space.
  • Clean it up. Ensure that your old place is spic and span before you return the keys to your landlord. Post-move cleanup can feel daunting, especially when you have undertaken a huge move. But, this is crucial to getting you security deposit back and is the right thing to do. Cleaning services might be offered from full-service GA moving companies. It doesn't hurt to ask about this!
  • The driver’s side. This means that you should ensure that your vehicle can make the trip (if it’s a long distance move). Also, you should do what’s necessary to update your information at your new DMV.
  • Do the paperwork. Ensure that you've completed all paperwork so that you are authorized to move into your new place.
  • Pencil it in. Create a schedule for the week leading up to moving day. This will give you a realistic look at how to handle moving tasks, and how much help you may need.

Do you know?

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The Motor Carrier Act, passed by Congress in 1935, replace the code of competition. The authorization the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) place was to regulate the trucking industry. Since then the ICC has been long abolished, however, it did quite a lot during its time. Based on the recommendations given by the ICC, Congress enacted the first hours of services regulation in 1938. This limited driving hours of truck and bus drivers. In 1941, the ICC reported that inconsistent weight limitation imposed by the states cause problems to effective interstate truck commerce.

In American English, the word "truck" has historically been preceded by a word describing the type of vehicle, such as a "tanker truck". In British English, preference would lie with "tanker" or "petrol tanker".

A commercial driver's license (CDL) is a driver's license required to operate large or heavy vehicles.

Beginning the the early 20th century, the 1920's saw several major advancements. There was improvement in rural roads which was significant for the time. The diesel engine, which are 25-40% more efficient than gas engines were also a major breakthrough. We also saw the standardization of truck and trailer sizes along with fifth wheel coupling systems. Additionally power assisted brakes and steering developed. By 1933, all states had some form of varying truck weight regulation.

In the United States, shipments larger than about 7,000 kg (15,432 lb) are classified as truckload freight (TL). It is more efficient and affordable for a large shipment to have exclusive use of one larger trailer. This is opposed to having to share space on a smaller Less than Truckload freight carrier.

The public idea of the trucking industry in the United States popular culture has gone through many transformations. However, images of the masculine side of trucking are a common theme throughout time. The 1940's first made truckers popular, with their songs and movies about truck drivers. Then in the 1950's they were depicted as heroes of the road, living a life of freedom on the open road. Trucking culture peaked in the 1970's as they were glorified as modern days cowboys, outlaws, and rebels. Since then the portrayal has come with a more negative connotation as we see in the 1990's. Unfortunately, the depiction of truck drivers went from such a positive depiction to that of troubled serial killers.

In 2009, the book 'Trucking Country: The Road to America's Walmart Economy' debuted, written by author Shane Hamilton. This novel explores the interesting history of trucking and connects certain developments. Particularly how such development in the trucking industry have helped the so-called big-box stored. Examples of these would include Walmart or Target, they dominate the retail sector of the U.S. economy. Yet, Hamilton connects historical and present-day evidence that connects such correlations.

“Country music scholar Bill Malone has gone so far as to say that trucking songs account for the largest component of work songs in the country music catalog. For a style of music that has, since its commercial inception in the 1920s, drawn attention to the coal man, the steel drivin’ man, the railroad worker, and the cowboy, this certainly speaks volumes about the cultural attraction of the trucker in the American popular consciousness.” — Shane Hamilton

In 1971, author and director Steven Spielberg, debuted his first feature length film. His made-for-tv film, Duel, portrayed a truck driver as an anonymous stalker. Apparently there seems to be a trend in the 70's to negatively stigmatize truck drivers.

Invented in 1890, the diesel engine was not an invention that became well known in popular culture. It was not until the 1930's for the United States to express further interest for diesel engines to be accepted. Gasoline engines were still in use on heavy trucks in the 1970's, while in Europe they had been entirely replaced two decades earlier.

Trucks and cars have much in common mechanically as well as ancestrally. One link between them is the steam-powered fardier Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot, who built it in 1769. Unfortunately for him, steam trucks were not really common until the mid 1800's. While looking at this practically, it would be much harder to have a steam truck. This is mostly due to the fact that the roads of the time were built for horse and carriages. Steam trucks were left to very short hauls, usually from a factory to the nearest railway station. In 1881, the first semi-trailer appeared, and it was in fact towed by a steam tractor manufactured by De Dion-Bouton. Steam-powered trucks were sold in France and in the United States, apparently until the eve of World War I. Also, at the beginning of World War II in the United Kingdom, they were known as 'steam wagons'.

All cars must pass some sort of emission check, such as a smog check to ensure safety. Similarly, trucks are subject to noise emission requirement, which is emanating from the U.S. Noise Control Act. This was intended to protect the public from noise health side effects. The loud noise is due to the way trucks contribute disproportionately to roadway noise. This is primarily due to the elevated stacks and intense tire and aerodynamic noise characteristics.

The year 1611 marked an important time for trucks, as that is when the word originated. The usage of "truck" referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. Further extending its usage in 1771, it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads. In 1916 it became shortened, calling it a "motor truck". While since the 1930's its expanded application goes as far as to say "motor-powered load carrier".

AMSA wanted to help consumers avoid untrustworthy or illegitimate movers. In January 2008, AMSA created the ProMover certification program for its members. As a member, you must have federal interstate operating authority. Members are also required to pass an annual criminal back check, be licensed by the FMCSA, and agree to abide by ethical standards. This would include honesty in advertising and in business transaction with customers. Each must also sign a contract committing to adhere to applicable Surface Transportation Board and FMCSA regulations. AMSA also takes into consideration and examines ownership. They are very strict, registration with state corporation commissions. This means that the mover must maintain at least a satisfactory rating with the Better Business Bureau (BBB). As one can imagine, those that pass are authorized to display the ProMove logo on the websites and in marketing materials. However, those that fail will be expelled from the program (and AMSA) if they cannot correct discrepancies during probation.

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.   The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

The word cargo is in reference to particular goods that are generally used for commercial gain. Cargo transportation is generally meant to mean by ship, boat, or plane. However, the term now applies to all types of freight, now including goods carried by train, van, or truck. This term is now used in the case of goods in the cold-chain, as perishable inventory is always cargo in transport towards its final home. Even when it is held in climate-controlled facilities, it is important to remember perishable goods or inventory have a short life.

Released in 1998, the film Black Dog featured Patrick Swayze as a truck driver who made it out of prison. However, his life of crime continued, as he was manipulated into the transportation of illegal guns. Writer Scott Doviak has described the movie as a "high-octane riff on White Line Fever" as well as "a throwback to the trucker movies of the 70s".

With the onset of trucking culture, truck drivers often became portrayed as protagonists in popular media. Author Shane Hamilton, who wrote "Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy", focuses on truck driving. He explores the history of trucking and while connecting it development in the trucking industry. It is important to note, as Hamilton discusses the trucking industry and how it helps the so-called big-box stores dominate the U.S. marketplace. Hamilton certainly takes an interesting perspective historically speaking.

By the time 2006 came, there were over 26 million trucks on the United States roads, each hauling over 10 billion short tons of freight (9.1 billion long tons). This was representing almost 70% of the total volume of freight. When, as a driver or an automobile drivers, most automobile drivers are largely unfamiliar with large trucks. As as a result of these unaware truck drivers and their massive 18-wheeler's numerous blind spots. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has determined that 70% of fatal automobile/tractor trailer accident happen for a reason. That being the result of "unsafe actions of automobile drivers". People, as well as drivers, need to realize the dangers of such large trucks and pay more attention. Likewise for truck drivers as well.

There many reasons for moving, each one with a unique and specific reason as to why. Relocation services, employee relocation, or workforce mobility can create a range of processes. This process of transferring employees, their families, and/or entire departments of a business to a new location can be difficult. Like some types of employee benefits, these matters are dealt with by human resources specialists within a corporation.

Many people are familiar with this type of moving, using truck rental services, or borrowing similar hardware, is known as DIY moving. Whoever is renting a truck or trailer large enough to carry their household goods may obtain moving equipment if necessary. Equipment may be items such as dollies, furniture pads, and cargo belts to protect furniture and to ease the moving process.