Connecticut Movers Top Rated

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103 Movers in Connecticut

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Patty Davis

“An extraordinary moving service!! They got ...”

“An extraordinary moving service!! They got directly down to business, and made the moving experience significantl...”

United States Connecticut

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Chris K

“This is a decent old mold family business. They...”

“This is a decent old mold family business. They are straightforward, liberal, accommodating and essentially incredibl...”

United States Connecticut

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Helen T

“Seamens Moving and Delivery is Professional, pr...”

“Seamens Moving and Delivery is Professional, productive and obliging. Boaz's group dealt with everything! Much thanks...”

United States Connecticut

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Noosh M

“I have moved such a large number of times that ...”

“I have moved such a large number of times that I could truly compose a book on moving and movers. I discovered RF Cle...”

United States Connecticut

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Ellen T.

“These men were amazing - proficient, dependable...”

“These men were amazing - proficient, dependable and speedy. We got an awesome arrangement from them and would utilize...”

United States Connecticut

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Virginia C.

“Somewhat late on the rating - these folks helpe...”

“Somewhat late on the rating - these folks helped my wife and me move prior this year. They were quick, quick, profici...”

United States Connecticut

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Sharon T.

“Collegian Movers assisted with the moving today...”

“Collegian Movers assisted with the moving today, they made an extraordinary showing. I will return for this next time!”

United States Connecticut

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Scott N.

“Fabulous Job. Exceedingly suggest these folks. ...”

“Fabulous Job. Exceedingly suggest these folks. On-Time and extremely mindful to detail, which made us feel exceptiona...”

United States Connecticut

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United States Connecticut

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United States Connecticut

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United States Connecticut

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United States Connecticut

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United States Connecticut

Find Top Movers In Connecticut Below

Are you looking for the best car transport in Connecticut? Make sure the dependable American moving company you choose can move your furniture as well as your vehicle. With many Connecticut long distance movers out there, it's important to get a credible moving cost estimate. Read Connecticut moving company reviews to find a moving company to help you out. If you're moving within Connecticut, be sure to read local moving company reviews. It's simpler than ever to find the best Connecticut movers for you. Get a free moving quote and Connecticut movers cost estimate today. Also, get free moving estimates from local movers and self-service movers. This way, you'll be better informed and have more information about the cost of a relocation.

Putting the PRO in Protection: HOW TO CHOOSE A REPUTABLE MOVING COMPANY


Surprise Fees That Can Inflate Your MOVING COSTS

  • Stairs, elevators, and long-carry fees. If your movers have to walk over 75 feet or use stairs/elevators, you’re looking at paying extra.
  • Moving supplies. Your moving companies in CT are more than happy to provide packing/moving supplies for you, but this convenience can come at an inflated price. (Pro tip: avoid this extra cost and get yourself some free moving boxes!)
  • Packing services. You can have your movers pack for you, but you’ll see extra in your contract for this optional service.
  • Waiting fees. If your moving company CT is at the destination before you and is forced to wait around, whether it’s a local move or a long-distance one, they will assess an extra charge.

 


5 Off-The-Beaten-Path Things You’ve Gotta Do in CT

  • P.T. Barnum Museum, Bridgeport
  • Walker Library of the History of Human Imagination, Stamford
  • Museum of Natural and Other Curiosities, Hartford
  • Reinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, New Haven
  • Holy Land U.S.A., Waterbury

The Easiest Way to Get a Grandfather Clock From Point A to Point B

  • Grandfather clocks are gorgeous pieces of artistic furniture that can instantly add character to any home, but prove to be a burden while moving.
  • Before moving the clock, be sure to have all the proper packing materials. These are things like bubble wrap, protective cardboard, and foam pads to protect the pieces, as well as sturdy boxes that can withstand the pressure of the contents inside.
  • Weigh the clock before taking it apart. Knowing how much your clock weighs is instrumental in being able to transport it safely without guesswork.
  • First, remove all glass panels and ensure that they’re wrapped carefully and securely. Be sure also to mark the outside of the box holding them, “FRAGILE.”
  • Next, remove all weights as well as the pendulum with extreme care. Be sure to label the weights with a sticky note or another type of removable paper so that you won’t be confused when it’s time to reassemble.
  • Pack the weights and the pendulum with care, just as you did with the glass panels, and also label their boxes with a “FRAGILE” label.
  • Be sure to secure the cables and chains so that they aren’t damaged during transport.
  • A custom-built crate with padding is the safest method of moving the body of the grandfather clock. After you’ve crated the wooden body, put the entire crate on a dolly to evenly distribute the weight and move it with ease.
  • If you are unsure at any point in time, check with moving companies CT for advice.




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The moving industry in the United States was deregulated with the Household Goods Transportation Act of 1980. This act allowed interstate movers to issue binding or fixed estimates for the first time. Doing so opened the door to hundreds of new moving companies to enter the industry. This led to an increase in competition and soon movers were no longer competing on services but on price. As competition drove prices lower and decreased what were already slim profit margins, "rogue" movers began hijacking personal property as part of a new scam. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) enforces Federal consumer protection regulations related to the interstate shipment of household goods (i.e., household moves that cross State lines). FMCSA has held this responsibility since 1999, and the Department of Transportation has held this responsibility since 1995 (the Interstate Commerce Commission held this authority prior to its termination in 1995).

In 1895 Karl Benz designed and built the first truck in history by using the internal combustion engine. Later that year some of Benz's trucks gave into modernization and went on to become the first bus by the Netphener. This would be the first motor bus company in history. Hardly a year later, in 1986, another internal combustion engine truck was built by a man named Gottlieb Daimler. As people began to catch on, other companies, such as Peugeot, Renault, and Bussing, also built their own versions. In 1899, the first truck in the United States was built by Autocar and was available with two optional horsepower motors, 5 or 8.

The intention of a trailer coupler is to secure the trailer to the towing vehicle. It is an important piece, as the trailer couple attaches to the trailer ball. This then forms a ball and socket connection. It allows for relative movement between the towing vehicle and trailer while towing over uneven road surfaces. The trailer ball should be mounted to the rear bumper or to a drawbar, which may be removable. The drawbar secures to the trailer hitch by inserting it into the hitch receiver and pinning it.   The three most common types of couplers used are straight couplers, A-frame couplers, and adjustable couplers. Another option is bumper-pull hitches in which case draw bars can exert a large amount of leverage on the tow vehicle. This makes it harder to recover from a swerving situation (thus it may not be the safest choice depending on your trip).

The decade of the 70s saw the heyday of truck driving, and the dramatic rise in the popularity of "trucker culture". Truck drivers were romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws (and this stereotype persists even today). This was due in part to their use of citizens' band (CB) radio to relay information to each other regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. Plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and using CB slang were popular not just with drivers but among the general public.

In 2009, the book 'Trucking Country: The Road to America's Walmart Economy' debuted, written by author Shane Hamilton. This novel explores the interesting history of trucking and connects certain developments. Particularly how such development in the trucking industry have helped the so-called big-box stored. Examples of these would include Walmart or Target, they dominate the retail sector of the U.S. economy. Yet, Hamilton connects historical and present-day evidence that connects such correlations.

Very light trucks. Popular in Europe and Asia, many mini-trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles, usually with monocoque bodies. Specialized designs with substantial frames such as the Italian Piaggio shown here are based upon Japanese designs (in this case by Daihatsu) and are popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities that often have very narrow alleyways. Regardless of the name, these small trucks serve a wide range of uses. In Japan, they are regulated under the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break on taxes for buying a smaller and less-powerful vehicle (currently, the engine is limited to 660 ccs {0.66L} displacement). These vehicles are used as on-road utility vehicles in Japan. These Japanese-made mini trucks that were manufactured for on-road use are competing with off-road ATVs in the United States, and import regulations require that these mini trucks have a 25 mph (40 km/h) speed governor as they are classified as low-speed vehicles. These vehicles have found uses in construction, large campuses (government, university, and industrial), agriculture, cattle ranches, amusement parks, and replacements for golf carts.Major mini truck manufacturers and their brands: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishi Minicab, Subaru Sambar, Suzuki Carry   As with many things in Europe and Asia, the illusion of delicacy and proper manners always seems to attract tourists. Popular in Europe and Asia, mini trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles with monochrome bodies. Such specialized designs with such great frames such as the Italian Piaggio, based upon Japanese designs. In this case it was based upon Japanese designs made by Daihatsu. These are very popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities, which often have very narrow alleyways. Despite whatever name they are called, these very light trucks serve a wide variety of purposes.   Yet, in Japan they are regulated under the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break in taxes for buying a small and less-powerful vehicle. Currently, the engine is limited to 660 cc [0.66L] displacement. These vehicles began being used as on-road utility vehicles in Japan. Classified as a low speed vehicle, these Japanese-made mini trucks were manufactured for on-road use for competing the the off-road ATVs in the United States. Import regulations require that the mini trucks have a 25 mph (40km/h) speed governor. Again, this is because they are low speed vehicles.   However, these vehicles have found numerous amounts of ways to help the community. They invest money into the government, universities, amusement parks, and replacements for golf cars. They have some major Japanese mini truck manufacturarers as well as brands such as: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishit Minicab, Subaru Sambar, and Suzuki Carry.

"Six Day on the Road" was a trucker hit released in 1963 by country music singer Dave Dudley. Bill Malone is an author as well as a music historian. He notes the song "effectively captured both the boredom and the excitement, as well as the swaggering masculinity that often accompanied long distance trucking."

Invented in 1890, the diesel engine was not an invention that became well known in popular culture. It was not until the 1930's for the United States to express further interest for diesel engines to be accepted. Gasoline engines were still in use on heavy trucks in the 1970's, while in Europe they had been entirely replaced two decades earlier.

There are certain characteristics of a truck that makes it an "off-road truck". They generally standard, extra heavy-duty highway-legal trucks. Although legal, they have off-road features like front driving axle and special tires for applying it to tasks such as logging and construction. The purpose-built off-road vehicles are unconstrained by weighing limits, such as the Libherr T 282B mining truck.

The definition of business logistics can be difficult to understand. Logistics can be simply put as a means of management that plans, implements, and controls the efficiency of the business. The notion of business logistics incorporates all sectors of the industry. It is used as a means to manage the fruition of project life cycles, supply chains, and resultant efficiency.

As the American Interstate Highway System began to expand in the 1950's, the trucking industry began to take over a large market share. That is, a large share of the transportation of goods throughout the country. Before this era, trains had been relied on to transport the bulk of the goods cross country or state to state. The Interstate Highway System was influential as it allows for merchandise to travel door to door with ease. Since then, truckload carriers have taken advantage of the interstate system, especially when performing a long distance move. Typically, they bring the merchandise from one distribution center of the country to another part of the country. The increase in truckload freight transportation has reduced the time it takes to transport the goods. Whether the freight was manufactured or produced for the different areas internationally, the time it takes to transport goods has decreased dramatically.  

In 1991 the film "Thelma & Louise" premiered, rapidly becoming a well known movie. Throughout the movie, a dirty and abrasive truck driver harasses the two women during chance encounters. Author Michael Dunne describes this minor character as "fat and ignorant" and "a lustful fool blinded by a delusion of male superiority". Thelma and Louise exact their revenge by feigning interest in him and then blowing up his tanker truck full of gas.

With the onset of trucking culture, truck drivers often became portrayed as protagonists in popular media. Author Shane Hamilton, who wrote "Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy", focuses on truck driving. He explores the history of trucking and while connecting it development in the trucking industry. It is important to note, as Hamilton discusses the trucking industry and how it helps the so-called big-box stores dominate the U.S. marketplace. Hamilton certainly takes an interesting perspective historically speaking.

In 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.

In today's popular culture, recreational vehicles struggle to find their own niche. Travel trailers or mobile home with limited living facilities, or where people can camp or stay have been referred to as trailers. Previously, many would refer to such vehicles as towable trailers.

Moving companies that operate within the borders of a particular state are usually regulated by the state DOT. Sometimes the public utility commission in that state will take care of it. This only applies to some of the U.S. states such as in California (California Public Utilities Commission) or Texas (Texas Department of Motor Vehicles. However, no matter what state you are in it is always best to make sure you are compliant with that state

Commercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you. Just to name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes. They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways. They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.