Wakefield Movers Top Rated

(888) 787-7813

69 Movers in Wakefield

Sponsored

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 1 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Kathy-Ann H.

“Hello there, I've had my little girl's Jans...”

“Hello there, I've had my little girl's Janssen upright moved in any event twice. The movers from Allston Piano we...”

United States Massachusetts Wakefield

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 1 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Alex F.

“Phenomenal! Our three movers, Geronimo, Carlos,...”

“Phenomenal! Our three movers, Geronimo, Carlos, and Leo, were only the best! They took all the worry of our turn insi...”

United States Massachusetts Wakefield

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 1 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Joey E.

“Extraordinary administration! Speedy and profic...”

“Extraordinary administration! Speedy and proficient. I unquestionably suggest this Hoffman Movers on the off chance t...”

United States Massachusetts Wakefield

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 1 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Romulo E Mariana B.

“Fastway Moving and Storage is incredible! A deb...”

“Fastway Moving and Storage is incredible! A debt of gratitude is in order for everything! Your client administration ...”

United States Massachusetts Wakefield

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 1 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Tim S.

“I.M. moved us yesterday from Charlestown to the...”

“I.M. moved us yesterday from Charlestown to the Seaport District. They were incredible! Appeared on time...packed our...”

United States Massachusetts Wakefield

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 1 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Luke P.

“SO Express made a completely fabulous showing. ...”

“SO Express made a completely fabulous showing. I utilized them for stacking administrations and they dismantled and t...”

United States Massachusetts Wakefield

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 1 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Patty K.

“Had these folks in yesterday to help with a lit...”

“Had these folks in yesterday to help with a little, yet enormous move. Required a crane to get a lounge chair into a ...”

United States Massachusetts Wakefield

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 1 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Sha G.

“They simply moved me and I couldn't request bet...”

“They simply moved me and I couldn't request better. On time, proficient, restless to if you don't mind sensible rates...”

United States Massachusetts Wakefield

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 1 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Manuel Gonzalez

“The best moving company in Boston, Efficient Mo...”

“The best moving company in Boston, Efficient Moving Services is by far the most inexpensive mover, quality, efficient...”

United States Massachusetts Wakefield

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 0 times, 0.0% customer satisfaction.

“This company has not reviews,

be the first!”

United States Massachusetts Wakefield

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 0 times, 0.0% customer satisfaction.

“This company has not reviews,

be the first!”

United States Massachusetts Wakefield

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 0 times, 0.0% customer satisfaction.

“This company has not reviews,

be the first!”

United States Massachusetts Wakefield

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 0 times, 0.0% customer satisfaction.

“This company has not reviews,

be the first!”

United States Massachusetts Wakefield

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 0 times, 0.0% customer satisfaction.

“This company has not reviews,

be the first!”

United States Massachusetts Wakefield

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 0 times, 0.0% customer satisfaction.

“This company has not reviews,

be the first!”

United States Massachusetts Wakefield

we can assist you to retrieve comfortable way to find your mover. To do this, we recommend you to learn Moving Authority's reviews of services. By reading the Wakefield, Massachusetts reviews of a relocation company, you are able to use them to your interests. We consider these reviews vital sources of information, although sometimes they may be too personal.

So you've done your research right? Right away, it's time to build a budgeted program before you start packing and moving. This way you have your own instruction to stay in course. Right away that you've got an affordable budget in mind, Moving Authority can help you find a best Wakefield, Massachusetts mover offering reasonably priced services. Moving Authority has extensive listings of the effective movers so you can browse Wakefield, Massachusetts moving companies, whether you 're moving locally or cross country. It is all important to obtain a free moving estimate with Moving Authority, this way you can make any necessary adjustments to your budgeted guideline and you will have a clear understanding of the cost for your Wakefield, Massachusetts move.

Aside from the moving estimation, you can likewise acquire a rid moving monetary value estimation right field on our web page, which is fundamentally a more exact idea of your moving price. Using these resourcefulness, reading recapitulation, doing your inquiry, planning a budget etc. Are all involved in the procedure of finding the Wakefield, Massachusetts outdo and most low cost removal firm for you. Moving Authority's resourcefulness can get a earthly concern of dispute before, during, and after your relocation. Mark Moving Authority authorization to establish finding your Wakefield, Massachusetts moving service a simple chore.

Do you know?

Do you know quotes

“Writer-director James Mottern said he was influenced by nuanced, beloved movies of the 1970s such as "The Last Detail" and "Five Easy Pieces." Mottern said his female trucker character began with a woman he saw at a Southern California truck stop — a "beautiful woman, bleach blonde ... skin tanned to leather walked like a Teamster, blue eyes.” - Paul Brownfield

Beginning the the early 20th century, the 1920's saw several major advancements. There was improvement in rural roads which was significant for the time. The diesel engine, which are 25-40% more efficient than gas engines were also a major breakthrough. We also saw the standardization of truck and trailer sizes along with fifth wheel coupling systems. Additionally power assisted brakes and steering developed. By 1933, all states had some form of varying truck weight regulation.

As most people have experienced, moving does involve having the appropriate materials. Some materials you might find at home or may be more resourceful to save money while others may choose to pay for everything. Either way materials such as boxes, paper, tape, and bubble wrap with which to pack box-able and/or protect fragile household goods. It is also used to consolidate the carrying and stacking on moving day. Self-service moving companies offer another viable option. It involves the person moving buying a space on one or more trailers or shipping containers. These containers are then professionally driven to the new location.

The number one hit on the Billboard chart in 1976 was quite controversial for the trucking industry. "Convoy," is a song about a group of reckless truck drivers bent on evading laws such as toll booths and speed traps. The song went on to inspire the film "Convoy", featuring defiant Kris Kristofferson screaming "piss on your law!" After the film's release, thousands of independent truck drivers went on strike. The participated in violent protests during the 1979 energy crisis. However, similar strikes had occurred during the 1973 energy crisis.

The year 1611 marked an important time for trucks, as that is when the word originated. The usage of "truck" referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. Further extending its usage in 1771, it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads. In 1916 it became shortened, calling it a "motor truck". While since the 1930's its expanded application goes as far as to say "motor-powered load carrier".

The American Trucking Associations initiated in 1985 with the intent to improve the industry's image. With public opinion declining the association tried numerous moves. One such move was changing the name of the "National Truck Rodeo" to the "National Driving Championship". This was due to the fact that the word rodeo seemed to imply recklessness and reckless driving.

A semi-trailer is almost exactly what it sounds like, it is a trailer without a front axle. Proportionally, its weight is supported by two factors. The weight falls upon a road tractor or by a detachable front axle assembly, known as a dolly. Generally, a semi-trailer is equipped with legs, known in the industry as "landing gear". This means it can be lowered to support it when it is uncoupled. In the United States, a trailer may not exceed a length of 57 ft (17.37 m) on interstate highways. However, it is possible to link two smaller trailers together to reach a length of 63 ft (19.20 m).

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.   The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

Truckload shipping is the movement of large amounts of cargo. In general, they move amounts necessary to fill an entire semi-trailer or inter-modal container. A truckload carrier is a trucking company that generally contracts an entire trailer-load to a single customer. This is quite the opposite of a Less than Truckload (LTL) freight services. Less than Truckload shipping services generally mix freight from several customers in each trailer. An advantage Full Truckload shipping carriers have over Less than Truckload carrier services is that the freight isn't handled during the trip. Yet, in an LTL shipment, goods will generally be transported on several different trailers.

A properly fitted close-coupled trailer is fitted with a rigid tow bar. It then projects from its front and hooks onto a hook on the tractor. It is important to not that it does not pivot as a draw bar does.

As the American Interstate Highway System began to expand in the 1950's, the trucking industry began to take over a large market share. That is, a large share of the transportation of goods throughout the country. Before this era, trains had been relied on to transport the bulk of the goods cross country or state to state. The Interstate Highway System was influential as it allows for merchandise to travel door to door with ease. Since then, truckload carriers have taken advantage of the interstate system, especially when performing a long distance move. Typically, they bring the merchandise from one distribution center of the country to another part of the country. The increase in truckload freight transportation has reduced the time it takes to transport the goods. Whether the freight was manufactured or produced for the different areas internationally, the time it takes to transport goods has decreased dramatically.  

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) issues Hours of Service regulations. At the same time, they govern the working hours of anyone operating a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in the United States. Such regulations apply to truck drivers, commercial and city bus drivers, and school bus drivers who operate CMVs. With these rules in place, the number of daily and weekly hours spent driving and working is limited. The FMCSA regulates the minimum amount of time drivers must spend resting between driving shifts. In regards to intrastate commerce, the respective state's regulations apply.

The American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO) was organized and founded on December 12, 1914. On November 13, 1973, the name was altered to the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. This slight change in name reflects a broadened scope of attention towards all modes of transportation. Despite the implications of the name change, most of the activities it is involved in still gravitate towards highways.

Released in 1998, the film Black Dog featured Patrick Swayze as a truck driver who made it out of prison. However, his life of crime continued, as he was manipulated into the transportation of illegal guns. Writer Scott Doviak has described the movie as a "high-octane riff on White Line Fever" as well as "a throwback to the trucker movies of the 70s".

The 1980s were full of happening things, but in 1982 a Southern California truck driver gained short-lived fame. His name was Larry Walters, also known as "Lawn Chair Larry", for pulling a crazy stunt. He ascended to a height of 16,000 feet (4,900 m) by attaching helium balloons to a lawn chair, hence the name. Walters claims he only intended to remain floating near the ground and was shocked when his chair shot up at a rate of 1,000 feet (300 m) per minute. The inspiration for such a stunt Walters claims his poor eyesight for ruining his dreams to become an Air Force pilot.

Smoke and the Bandit was released in 1977, becoming the third-highest grossing movie. Following only behind Star Wars Episode IV and Close Encounter of the Third Kind, all three movies making an impact on popular culture. Conveniently, during that same year, CB Bears debuted as well. The Saturday morning cartoon features mystery-solving bears who communicate by CB radio. As the 1970's decade began to end and the 80's broke through, the trucking phenomenon had wade. With the rise of cellular phone technology, the CB radio was no longer popular with passenger vehicles, but, truck drivers still use it today.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) conducted a series of tests. These tests were extensive field tests of roads and bridges to assess damages to the pavement. In particular they wanted to know how traffic contributes to the deterioration of pavement materials. These tests essentially led to the 1964 recommendation by AASHTO to Congress. The recommendation determined the gross weight limit for trucks to be determined by a bridge formula table. This includes table based on axle lengths, instead of a state upper limit. By the time 1970 came around, there were over 18 million truck on America's roads.

In order to load or unload bots and other cargo to and from a trailer, trailer winches are designed for this purpose. They consist of a ratchet mechanism and cable. The handle on the ratchet mechanism is then turned to tighten or loosen the tension on the winch cable. Trailer winches vary, some are manual while others are motorized. Trailer winches are most typically found on the front of the trailer by towing an A-frame.

There are various versions of a moving scam, but it basically begins with a prospective client. Then the client starts to contact a moving company to request a cost estimate. In today's market, unfortunately, this often happens online or via phone calls. So essentially a customer is contacting them for a quote when the moving company may not have a license. These moving sales people are salesman prone to quoting sometimes low. Even though usually reasonable prices with no room for the movers to provide a quality service if it is a broker.

Heavy trucks. A cement mixer is an example of Class 8 heavy trucks. Heavy trucks are the largest on-road trucks, Class 8. These include vocational applications such as heavy dump trucks, concrete pump trucks, and refuse hauling, as well as ubiquitous long-haul 6×4 and 4x2 tractor units. Road damage and wear increase very rapidly with the axle weight. The axle weight is the truck weight divided by the number of axles, but the actual axle weight depends on the position of the load over the axles. The number of steering axles and the suspension type also influence the amount of the road wear. In many countries with good roads, a six-axle truck may have a maximum weight over 50 tons (49 long tons; 55 short tons).

Commercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you. Just to name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes. They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways. They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.

Prior to the 20th century, freight was generally transported overland via trains and railroads. During this time, trains were essential, and they were highly efficient at moving large amounts of freight. But, they could only deliver that freight to urban centers for distribution by horse-drawn transport. Though there were several trucks throughout this time, they were used more as space for advertising that for actual utility. At this time, the use of range for trucks was quite challenging. The use of electric engines, lack of paved rural roads, and small load capacities limited trucks to most short-haul urban routes.

“The association of truckers with cowboys and related myths was perhaps most obvious during the urban-cowboy craze of the late 1970s, a period that saw middle-class urbanites wearing cowboy clothing and patronizing simulated cowboy nightclubs. During this time, at least four truck driver movies appeared, CB radio became popular, and truck drivers were prominently featured in all forms of popular media.” — Lawrence J. Ouellet

The interstate moving industry in the United States maintains regulation by the FMCSA, which is part of the USDOT. With only a small staff (fewer than 20 people) available to patrol hundreds of moving companies, enforcement is difficult. As a result of such a small staff, there are in many cases, no regulations that qualify moving companies as 'reliable'. Without this guarantee, it is difficult to a consumer to make a choice. Although, moving companies can provide and often display a DOT license.

AMSA wanted to help consumers avoid untrustworthy or illegitimate movers. In January 2008, AMSA created the ProMover certification program for its members. As a member, you must have federal interstate operating authority. Members are also required to pass an annual criminal back check, be licensed by the FMCSA, and agree to abide by ethical standards. This would include honesty in advertising and in business transaction with customers. Each must also sign a contract committing to adhere to applicable Surface Transportation Board and FMCSA regulations. AMSA also takes into consideration and examines ownership. They are very strict, registration with state corporation commissions. This means that the mover must maintain at least a satisfactory rating with the Better Business Bureau (BBB). As one can imagine, those that pass are authorized to display the ProMove logo on the websites and in marketing materials. However, those that fail will be expelled from the program (and AMSA) if they cannot correct discrepancies during probation.

A business route (occasionally city route) in the United States and Canada is a short special route connected to a parent numbered highway at its beginning, then routed through the central business district of a nearby city or town, and finally reconnecting with the same parent numbered highway again at its end.

As of January 1, 2000, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) was established as its own separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation. This came about under the "Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999". The FMCSA is based in Washington, D.C., employing more than 1,000 people throughout all 50 States, including in the District of Columbia. Their staff dedicates themselves to the improvement of safety among commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and to saving lives.

DOT officers of each state are generally in charge of the enforcement of the Hours of Service (HOS). These are sometimes checked when CMVs pass through weigh stations. Drivers found to be in violation of the HOS can be forced to stop driving for a certain period of time. This, in turn, may negatively affect the motor carrier's safety rating. Requests to change the HOS are a source of debate. Unfortunately, many surveys indicate drivers routinely get away with violating the HOS. Such facts have started yet another debate on whether motor carriers should be required to us EOBRs in their vehicles. Relying on paper-based log books does not always seem to enforce the HOS law put in place for the safety of everyone.

Full truckload carriers normally deliver a semi-trailer to a shipper who will fill the trailer with freight for one destination. Once the trailer is filled, the driver returns to the shipper to collect the required paperwork. Upon receiving the paperwork the driver will then leave with the trailer containing freight. Next, the driver will proceed to the consignee and deliver the freight him or herself. At times, a driver will transfer the trailer to another driver who will drive the freight the rest of the way. Full Truckload service (FTL) transit times are generally restricted by the driver's availability. This is according to Hours of Service regulations and distance. It is typically accepted that Full Truckload carriers will transport freight at an average rate of 47 miles per hour. This includes traffic jams, queues at intersections, other factors that influence transit time.  

A properly fitted close-coupled trailer is fitted with a rigid tow bar. It then projects from its front and hooks onto a hook on the tractor. It is important to not that it does not pivot as a draw bar does.

The term "lorry" has an ambiguous origin, but it is likely that its roots were in the rail transport industry. This is where the word is known to have been used in 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage) specifically a large flat wagon. It may derive from the verb lurry, which means to pull or tug, of uncertain origin. It's expanded meaning was much more exciting as "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods", and has been in usage since 1911. Previously, unbeknownst to most, the word "lorry" was used for a fashion of big horse-drawn goods wagon.

The word cargo is in reference to particular goods that are generally used for commercial gain. Cargo transportation is generally meant to mean by ship, boat, or plane. However, the term now applies to all types of freight, now including goods carried by train, van, or truck. This term is now used in the case of goods in the cold-chain, as perishable inventory is always cargo in transport towards its final home. Even when it is held in climate-controlled facilities, it is important to remember perishable goods or inventory have a short life.

The main purpose of the HOS regulation is to prevent accidents due to driver fatigue. To do this, the number of driving hours per day, as well as the number of driving hours per week, have been limited. Another measure to prevent fatigue is to keep drivers on a 21 to 24-hour schedule in order to maintain a natural sleep/wake cycle. Drivers must take a daily minimum period of rest and are allowed longer "weekend" rest periods. This is in hopes to combat cumulative fatigue effects that accrue on a weekly basis.

The concept of a bypass is a simple one. It is a road or highway that purposely avoids or "bypasses" a built-up area, town, or village. Bypasses were created with the intent to let through traffic flow without having to get stuck in local traffic. In general they are supposed to reduce congestion in a built-up area. By doing so, road safety will greatly improve.   A bypass designated for trucks traveling a long distance, either commercial or otherwise, is called a truck route.

Released in 1998, the film Black Dog featured Patrick Swayze as a truck driver who made it out of prison. However, his life of crime continued, as he was manipulated into the transportation of illegal guns. Writer Scott Doviak has described the movie as a "high-octane riff on White Line Fever" as well as "a throwback to the trucker movies of the 70s".

The Federal-Aid Highway Amendments of 1974 established a federal maximum gross vehicle weight of 80,000 pounds (36,000 kg). It also introduced a sliding scale of truck weight-to-length ratios based on the bridge formula. Although, they did not establish a federal minimum weight limit. By failing to establish a federal regulation, six contiguous in the Mississippi Valley rebelled. Becoming known as the "barrier state", they refused to increase their Interstate weight limits to 80,000 pounds. Due to this, the trucking industry faced a barrier to efficient cross-country interstate commerce.

Ultra light trucks are very easy to spot or acknowledge if you are paying attention. They are often produced variously such as golf cars, for instance, it has internal combustion or a battery electric drive. They usually for off-highway use on estates, golf courses, parks, in stores, or even someone in an electric wheelchair. While clearly not suitable for highway usage, some variations may be licensed as slow speed vehicles. The catch is that they may on operate on streets, usually a body variation of a neighborhood electric vehicle. A few manufacturers produce specialized chassis for this type of vehicle. Meanwhile, Zap Motors markets a version of the xebra electric tricycle. Which, believe it or not, is able to attain a general license in the United States as a motorcycle.

Tracing the origins of particular words can be quite different with so many words in the English Dictionary. Some say the word "truck" might have come from a back-formation of "truckle", meaning "small wheel" or "pulley". In turn, both sources emanate from the Greek trokhos (τροχός), meaning "wheel", from trekhein (τρέχειν, "to run").

Light trucks are classified this way because they are car-sized, yet in the U.S. they can be no more than 6,300 kg (13,900 lb). These are used by not only used by individuals but also businesses as well. In the UK they may not weigh more than 3,500 kg (7,700 lb) and are authorized to drive with a driving license for cars. Pickup trucks, popular in North America, are most seen in North America and some regions of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Although Europe doesn't seem to follow this trend, where the size of the commercial vehicle is most often made as vans.

Known as a truck in the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Puerto Rico, it is essentially a motor vehicle designed to transport cargo. Otherwise known as a lorry in the United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa, and Indian Subcontinent. Trucks vary not only in their types, but also in size, power, and configuration, the smallest being mechanically like an automobile. Commercial trucks may be very large and powerful, configured to mount specialized equipment. These are necessary in the case of fire trucks, concrete mixers, and suction excavators etc.

In the United States and Canada, the cost for long-distance moves is generally determined by a few factors. The first is the weight of the items to be moved and the distance it will go. Cost is also based on how quickly the items are to be moved, as well as the time of the year or month which the move occurs. In the United Kingdom and Australia, it's quite different. They base price on the volume of the items as opposed to their weight. Keep in mind some movers may offer flat rate pricing.