Aladdin Transfer and Storage

USDOT # 70719
PUC # 166480
PO Box 6291
Santa Rosa, CA 95406
Santa Rosa
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (707) 575-5656
Company Site:

Moving with Aladdin Transfer and Storage

Welcome to Aladdin Transfer and Storage, an interstate specialists for Wheaton World Wide Moving (USDOT 70719 MC 87113 - Interstate Agent for Wheaton World Wide Moving). We have been giving excellent moving and capacity administrations toward the North Bay for more than 25 years. At Aladdin Transfer and Storage, we trust that moving is more than only a change of location, it is a noteworthy life change. Our expert movers comprehend that we are moving more than simply moving boxes and furniture; we are moving your life. At Aladdin Transfer and Storage we give our customers proficient moving and capacity benefits that far surpass the largest amounts of industry models.

See More Moving companies in Santa Rosa, California

Your Aladdin Transfer and Storage Reviews

required (not published)

We had a great experience with Aladdin Transfer. They packed everything up, were friendly and efficient and showed great care in our move. This is the 4th moving company we have used collectively and they are by far the best. Will definitely hire again. Seriously the move could not have gone smoother. Thanks Aladdin!

I was so content with their services, that I have informed two colleagues concerning them as of now. One utilized them as of now, and was pretty much as cheerful as me. It's so difficult to get great service at a sensible cost, however Aladdin Transfer and Storage did it for me! Much thanks!!

Did You Know

QuestionPrior tothe 20th century, freight was generally transported overland via trains and railroads.During this time, trains were essential, and they werehighlyefficient at moving large amounts of freight.But, they could only deliver that freight to urban centers for distribution by horse-drawn transport.Though there were several trucks throughout this time, theywere usedmore as space for advertising that for actual utility.At this time, the use of range for trucks was quite challenging.The use of electric engines, lack of paved rural roads, and small load capacities limited trucks to most short-haul urban routes.

QuestionIn 1999, The Simpsons episode Maximum Homerdrive aired. It featured Homer and Bart making a delivery for a truck driver named Red after he unexpectedly dies of 'food poisoning'.


Very light trucks.Popular in Europe and Asia, many mini-trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles, usually with monocoque bodies.Specialized designs withsubstantialframes such as the Italian Piaggio shown hereare basedupon Japanese designs (in this case by Daihatsu) and are popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities that often have very narrow alleyways. Regardless of the name, these small trucks serve a wide range of uses.In Japan, theyare regulatedunder the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break on taxes for buying a smaller and less-powerful vehicle (currently, the engineis limitedto 660 ccs {0.66L} displacement). These vehiclesare usedas on-road utility vehicles in Japan.These Japanese-made mini trucks thatwere manufacturedfor on-road use are competing with off-road ATVs in the United States, and import regulationsrequirethat these mini trucks have a 25 mph (40 km/h) speed governor as theyare classifiedas low-speed vehicles.These vehicles have found uses in construction, large campuses (government, university, and industrial), agriculture, cattle ranches, amusement parks, and replacements for golf carts.Major mini truck manufacturers and their brands: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishi Minicab, Subaru Sambar, Suzuki Carry
As with many things in Europe and Asia, the illusion of delicacy and proper manners always seems to attract tourists.Popular in Europe and Asia, mini trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles with monochrome bodies.Such specialized designs with such great frames such as the Italian Piaggio, based upon Japanese designs. In this case itwas basedupon Japanese designs made by Daihatsu.These are very popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities, which often have very narrow alleyways.Despite whatever name theyare called, these very light trucks serve a wide variety of purposes.
Yet, in Japan theyare regulatedunder the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break in taxes for buying a small and less-powerful vehicle. Currently, the engineis limitedto 660 cc [0.66L] displacement. These vehicles beganbeing usedas on-road utility vehicles in Japan.Classified as a low speed vehicle, these Japanese-made mini truckswere manufacturedfor on-road use for competing the the off-road ATVs in the United States. Import regulationsrequirethat the mini trucks have a 25 mph (40km/h) speed governor. Again, this is because they are low speed vehicles.
However, these vehicles have foundnumerousamounts of ways to help the community.They invest money into the government, universities, amusement parks, and replacements for golf cars.They have some major Japanese mini truck manufacturarers as well as brands such as: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishit Minicab, Subaru Sambar, and Suzuki Carry.


As the American Interstate Highway System began to expand in the 1950's, the trucking industry began to take over a large market share. That is, a large share of the transportation of goods throughout the country. Before this era, trains hadbeen reliedon to transport the bulk of the goods cross country or state to state.The Interstate Highway System was influential as it allows for merchandise to travel door to door with ease.Since then, truckload carriers have taken advantage of the interstate system, especially when performing a long distance move.Typically, they bring the merchandise from one distribution center of the country to another part of the country.The increase in truckload freight transportation has reduced the time it takes to transport the goods.Whether the freightwas manufacturedor produced for the different areasinternationally, the time it takes to transport goods has decreased dramatically.


The year of 1977 marked the release of the infamous Smokey and the Bandit.It went on to be the third highest grossing film that year, following tough competitors like Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind.Burt Reynolds plays the protagonist, or "The Bandit", who escorts "The Snowman"in order todeliver bootleg beer.Reynolds once stated he envisioned trucking as a "hedonistic joyrideentirelydevoid from economic reality"
Another action film in 1977 also focused on truck drivers, as was the trend it seems. Breaker! Breaker! starring infamous Chuck Norris also focused on truck drivers. They were also displaying movie posters with the catch phrase "... he's got a CB radio and a hundred friends whojustmight get mad!"