BEST PRICED MOVING AND STORAGE

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Best Priced Moving and Storage


  1. Variation Between Rental Prices Can Be Shocking 
  2. Long Distance or State to State
  3. Storage
  4. Look Into Small Companies
  5. Take Advantage of Today's Resources

1. Variation Between Rental Prices Can Be Shocking

Movers often encounter a great deal of price differentiation at the various moving and storage companies. Depending on when a mover contacts the business to obtain a price estimate, the quotes could vary by over 100%. Actual truck rental prices might surprise some movers who seek out companies that advertise extremely low prices. Many reports say that some of these ads offering daily rentals for $19.99 sound great, but most of them turn out to charge twice as much or more.

best priced moving and storage

2. Long Distance or State to State

Out of state and cross-country prices might also cost more than the normal rates if they are based upon a long distance rate scale with additional fees. Truck rental service is usually the most economical method of moving long distances other than container shipping. Trucks provide the most space, fitting all of a family’s belongings from all of the rooms in the home. Trucks also provide more space and convenience than a van rental or pickup truck. Choosing companies that offer a mover-satisfaction guarantee, pick up and drop off service can be helpful, as well as roadside assistance, which is especially important.

3. Storage

Pods that movers can pack themselves usually contain around 300 cu ft. of packing space and 2000 lbs. Many portable moving containers are equipped to tow with one’s own vehicle and come with a custom designed trailer so that movers can save on paying the company to do the pick-up and drop off. These large storage containers are made with heavy-duty materials like plywood and can keep the items inside safe from the elements outdoors.

 Best Moving And Storage Prices



4. Look Into Small Companies

Some of these very small companies have business licenses and can be researched and traced. Many of them specialize in specific moving services like pool tables, dumping runs, junk removal, and cleaning, as well as packing services and shrink-wrap. Same day service is normally available for both commercial and residential moves. Purchasing insurance for the move is a good idea and movers should obtain all price quotes and service agreements in writing. There are also licensed labor companies in the classifieds that offer skilled day labor per hour. Some of these companies specialize in veteran employment.

5. Take Advantage of Today's Resources

There are services online that can help movers to find the lowest cost storage within a state. Storage centers that provide locked gating around the units of the facility and 24 hr. monitoring is the most secure. Other services that movers may find beneficial include climate control, 24-hour access, and sufficient space for one's belongings. A cheaper storage may not provide adequate security or may contain other biological and temperature related problems. Precious works of art and pianos are most in need of climate control. It is common for some storage companies to offer 6 to 12-month discount rates and have more supply available due to the fact that the facility is several miles from town and slightly out of the way. It may be worth it in the long-run to opt for the discounts, depending on how often a mover will need to access the space.

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