HOW TO MOVE A GUN SAFE

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Moving a Gun Safe Properly


  1. I Own A Gun Safe But How Do I Move It?
  2. Before: Clean, Secure, & Find a Permanent Home
  3. Gun Safe Moving Companies
  4. During: (Safety Warning: Do Not DIY)
  5. After: Organize, Clean, and Relax

1. I Own A Gun Safe but How Do I Move It?

If you own a variety of firearms, no doubt you own a gun safe for them. If you’re dissatisfied with the location of the gun safe, take caution before moving it, because you’re aware that a gun safe is a heavy, bulky item. A safe moving dolly is necessary before you attempt to move the safe. Safe moving dollies are specially made in order to transport the heavy equipment. Here are some tips on how to move a gun safe.

Gun Safe Movers

2. Before: Clean, Secure, & Find a Permanent Home

Make sure the area that the gun safe dolly will be moved to is clean and secure.

Also, be sure that this is the gun safe’s permanent home—moving the gun safe multiple times will be time-consuming and tiring! Another thing to make sure you have before moving your gun safe is the right equipment. If you’re moving your gun safe up or downstairs, use a gun safe moving dolly rental that is made for stairs. Don’t forget to secure the gun safe with ratchet straps or sturdy rope.

3. Gun Safe Moving Companies

If the gun safe is light enough and it’s being moved across the same floor, you may consider using heavy duty furniture gliders. These work the best on tile and hardwood, but it is possible to put down plywood over your carpeting and still use the furniture gliders. Be careful when installing the furniture gliders—do not do this by yourself! Make sure you have a few other people helping you to install them.

Some gun safes have removable doors that lift up off their hinge pins.


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If your gun safe has a removable door, make sure to remove it, safely, and reduce the weight of the gun safe so it’s easier to move. Whether or not your gun safe has a removable door, make sure to take all of the guns out before you move it! Be careful, though, and make sure to store the guns in a safe and inaccessible area while you are moving the gun safe. Check and double-check that none of the guns are loaded and that the safety is on for each gun. Keep the guns in a locked closet or somewhere others will not be able to reach them.

4. During (Safety Warning: DO NOT DIY)

Make sure to have a team of people to help you move the gun safe. Moving it by yourself is definitely not recommended, as it could result in neck, back or knee injuries. If you don’t have any friends or family available to help you move, do some research and see if you can hire some movers to help you. They may also have equipment you can use if you don’t have the right safe moving equipment.

Make sure to also use proper lifting techniques. Never, ever use your back to push or strain. Bend your knees and use the strength in your knees for lifting or pushing.

**It is highly recommended you consult with your doctor if you’re unsure whether or not your body can handle the strain.**

5. After: Organize, Clean, and Relax

Once the gun safe is cozy in its new home, make sure the guns find their way back to the gun safe as quickly as possible. Be sure to also clean up the equipment and put it back where it belongs. Now, take a breather and congratulate yourself—you moved a gun safe and you can call your self-safe movers!

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