PROFESSIONAL MOVING SERVICE

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Professional Moving Service

Hire Trustworthy Moving Services

  1. Why Should I Hire a Professional?
  2. Professional Moving Companies: Making the Difference
  3. Benefits of Hiring Pro's 
  4. Components for a Successful Move

1. Why Should I Hire a Professional?

Hiring a professional moving service is an ideal way to have property moved from one place to another, regardless of how far. There is no reason a person should have to stress more by moving everything out of their home or property on their own. There are a ton of moving companies out there for people to choose from.

The key to hiring the right professional moving service includes reading the reviews and ratings of other customers. This will give a person insight on how reliable and trustworthy a company is. Contacting or visiting moving companies' websites is also a great way to find a company to hire. Inquire about all of the services offered and evaluate which services would be of good use to your move.

2. Professional Moving Companies: Making the Difference

When it comes to moving, it's important to assess what your needs and wants are before you go into the move. Many people opt to cut corners with their moves and may think they can do it themselves or even worse get a budget moving company. The old saying goes if something seems too good to be true it usually is.


Let me tell you that definitely holds true with moving companies. Sometimes the reason that their quotes are so low is that they are operating without proper licensing or equipment. It's true that companies in an over saturated market offer competitive pricing, but if one mover in the bunch is offering prices that are way below the others it's probably not going to save you money in the end if your things do not arrive safe and sound.


This is why it is best to get a professional moving service. Pro movers take the time to dot all the I’s and cross all the T’s. A Pro mover will take into consideration the unforeseen circumstances. To make sure that your move is as stress-free as possible.


Pro movers are the right choice for someone with a demanding job that has less time to spare. There are services that will also take out trash items from your old home, and even unpack boxes in your new home. Obviously, this is a premium service but if you are living a life where time is money, this may be the best option for you. You may want to look into full-service movers cost. 


Specifically, if your move is based on either taking a new job or being relocated within your current corporate structure.
Professional moving services will even offer insurance for any high-value items you may have and storage options if there is any delay in your arrival or need to hold off moving new items in. Whatever the reason, pro moving service are a great option for many.

3. Benefits of Hiring Pro's

There are so many ways to benefit from hiring a moving company to do the dirty work. Below, are some ways in which hiring a moving company could help with your move.

  • It will relieve the stress of doing it on your own.

  • They can do it in a timely and quick manner.

  • There is moving insurance that comes with many moving companies' services.

  • Moving companies include a variety of packages and services to choose from, including full-service packing.

  • They can safely move a person's belongings anywhere they need to go.

  • They service residential and commercial moves.

  • Ultimately, hiring a professional full service moving company can save money.

  • As the owner of the belongings, you won't have to move a finger and can focus more on the other things involved with the move.

  • Movers will move the belongings to any room that you would like them in. Beds can be placed in bedrooms, desks in offices, etc.

  • Many moving companies will have specials or deals for their customers, which will help save even more money.

  • The overall move will go about much smoother than if you were to try and do everything on your own.

  • There will be no need to rely on family and friends to help move big pieces of furniture.

Corporate Relocation Questions Answered


With the above being said, it is always a wise decision to consider all of the possible options for your upcoming move. Professional moving services are definitely something to keep in mind. With all of the companies available, make sure to compare them and find one that you can trust with your property.

When all is said and done, all of the belongings will be safely taken to their new home whether it is an office building, company, or home. Of course, this is all relative to the fact that you had already done research and found a professional company known for their great services and trustworthiness.

4. Components for a Successful Move

When you are moving there are so many factors to keep in mind for the transportation of all of your belongings. It is important to ensure that you find the right crew for the job and one of the biggest challenges can be if you are moving a piano. When you find the right moving company that can handle moving your piano it should be music to your ears.
 
When it comes to moving your piano not all movers are created equal. If you simply hire a regular moving service, one that does not specifically specialize or own the proper equipment to move your grandmas piano or your baby grand you may find yourself the subject of a really sad song.
 
Pianos can weigh anywhere from a couple hundred pounds to over 1,000 lbs. so I would assume you, the mover, have already realized that this is no easy task (or one you could do yourself). Piano movers don’t use the standard dollies to move your instrument. Pianos are not a normal piece of furniture but instead, they have wires, keys, pedals and so many moving parts.
 
Often times if the piano is moving down a flight of stairs or through narrow doorways it may need someone who knows the ins and outs of the piano to understand how to navigate this type of space. Often times it is simply impossible, because of the shape and size of your piano and your house to move the piano without having it somewhat dismantled.
 
This may sound insanely scary to you because most people who own pianos or play them have a deeply sentimental connection to them. This is exactly why it is important to find proper piano movers near you. They will actually be skilled in how to move your piano with finesse, as well as being able to put the instrument back together again.
 
If a company does not specifically advertise they move pianos they probably are not the right company for the job. If they do not ask proper questions about your piano prior to moving, like what type of piano it is, the age, etc. then they are far from piano aficionados.
 
Move your piano the proper way by doing your homework. And don’t worry if your piano sounds a bit out of tune a few days after the move because this is normal. All of the movement, even when done properly, can upset the keys and the sounds. If it is a long move, the biggest effect on a piano is temperature flocculation when it comes to sound. Pianos always need to be tuned after each move. Good luck with your move and find the right movers to move a piano.
 

Comments

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Felicity H

5 years, 1 month ago

Good Day,
I have heard of so many stories where property gets damaged by the move and the moving company only pays a fraction of the price that the items were worth, if they pay anything at all. What would you suggest would be the safest way to ensure that we have proper insurance?

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Victor Peraz

4 years, 8 months ago

Is there any way to find out if the mover you choose to move your business has experience moving other businesses? I want to use a mover but I also want one that is experienced in moving large corporate businesses as we are on a time limit with our move. We want our move to take up the least amount of time possible. Is there any way we can check their history with moves? Thanks!

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In American English, the word "truck" has historically been preceded by a word describing the type of vehicle, such as a "tanker truck". In British English, preference would lie with "tanker" or "petrol tanker".

The trucking industry has made a large historical impact since the early 20th century. It has affected the U.S. both politically as well as economically since the notion has begun. Previous to the invention of automobiles, most freight was moved by train or horse-drawn carriage. Trucks were first exclusively used by the military during World War I.   After the war, construction of paved roads increased. As a result, trucking began to achieve significant popularity by the 1930's. Soon after trucking became subject to various government regulation, such as the hours of service. During the later 1950's and 1960's, trucking accelerated due to the construction of the Interstate Highway System. The Interstate Highway System is an extensive network of freeways linking major cities cross country.

The Motor Carrier Act, passed by Congress in 1935, replace the code of competition. The authorization the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) place was to regulate the trucking industry. Since then the ICC has been long abolished, however, it did quite a lot during its time. Based on the recommendations given by the ICC, Congress enacted the first hours of services regulation in 1938. This limited driving hours of truck and bus drivers. In 1941, the ICC reported that inconsistent weight limitation imposed by the states cause problems to effective interstate truck commerce.

Beginning the the early 20th century, the 1920's saw several major advancements. There was improvement in rural roads which was significant for the time. The diesel engine, which are 25-40% more efficient than gas engines were also a major breakthrough. We also saw the standardization of truck and trailer sizes along with fifth wheel coupling systems. Additionally power assisted brakes and steering developed. By 1933, all states had some form of varying truck weight regulation.

Invented in 1890, the diesel engine was not an invention that became well known in popular culture. It was not until the 1930's for the United States to express further interest for diesel engines to be accepted. Gasoline engines were still in use on heavy trucks in the 1970's, while in Europe they had been entirely replaced two decades earlier.

Many modern trucks are powered by diesel engines, although small to medium size trucks with gas engines exist in the United States. The European Union rules that vehicles with a gross combination of mass up to 3,500 kg (7,716 lb) are also known as light commercial vehicles. Any vehicles exceeding that weight are known as large goods vehicles.

Medium trucks are larger than light but smaller than heavy trucks. In the US, they are defined as weighing between 13,000 and 33,000 pounds (6,000 and 15,000 kg). For the UK and the EU, the weight is between 3.5 and 7.5 tons (3.9 and 8.3 tons). Local delivery and public service (dump trucks, garbage trucks, and fire-fighting trucks) are around this size.

In some states, a business route is designated by adding the letter "B" after the number instead of placing a "Business" sign above it. For example, Arkansas signs US business route 71 as "US 71B". On some route shields and road signs, the word "business" is shortened to just "BUS". This abbreviation is rare and usually avoided to prevent confusion with bus routes.

Signage of business routes varies, depending on the type of route they are derived from. Business routes paralleling U.S. and state highways usually have exactly the same shield shapes and nearly the same overall appearance as the routes they parallel, with a rectangular plate reading "BUSINESS" placed above the shield (either supplementing or replacing the directional plate, depending on the preference of the road agency). In order to better identify and differentiate alternate routes from the routes they parallel, some states such as Maryland are beginning to use green shields for business routes off U.S. highways. In addition, Maryland uses a green shield for business routes off state highways with the word "BUSINESS" in place of "MARYLAND" is used for a state route.

Within the world of transportation, bypass routes are often very controversial. This is mostly due to the fact that they require the building of a road carrying heavy traffic where no road existed before. This has created conflict among society thus creating a divergence between those in support of bypasses and those who are opposed. Supporters believe they reduce congestion in built up areas. Those in opposition do not believe in developing (often rural) undeveloped land. In addition, the cities that are bypassed may also oppose such a project as reduced traffic may, in turn, reduce and damage business.

In the United States, commercial truck classification is fixed by each vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8. Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks. Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS, formerly known as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.   The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

Full truckload carriers normally deliver a semi-trailer to a shipper who will fill the trailer with freight for one destination. Once the trailer is filled, the driver returns to the shipper to collect the required paperwork. Upon receiving the paperwork the driver will then leave with the trailer containing freight. Next, the driver will proceed to the consignee and deliver the freight him or herself. At times, a driver will transfer the trailer to another driver who will drive the freight the rest of the way. Full Truckload service (FTL) transit times are generally restricted by the driver's availability. This is according to Hours of Service regulations and distance. It is typically accepted that Full Truckload carriers will transport freight at an average rate of 47 miles per hour. This includes traffic jams, queues at intersections, other factors that influence transit time.  

As the American Interstate Highway System began to expand in the 1950's, the trucking industry began to take over a large market share. That is, a large share of the transportation of goods throughout the country. Before this era, trains had been relied on to transport the bulk of the goods cross country or state to state. The Interstate Highway System was influential as it allows for merchandise to travel door to door with ease. Since then, truckload carriers have taken advantage of the interstate system, especially when performing a long distance move. Typically, they bring the merchandise from one distribution center of the country to another part of the country. The increase in truckload freight transportation has reduced the time it takes to transport the goods. Whether the freight was manufactured or produced for the different areas internationally, the time it takes to transport goods has decreased dramatically.  

Implemented in 2014, the National Registry, requires all Medical Examiners (ME) who conduct physical examinations and issue medical certifications for interstate CMV drivers to complete training on FMCSA’s physical qualification standards, must pass a certification test. This is to demonstrate competence through periodic training and testing. CMV drivers whose medical certifications expire must use MEs on the National Registry for their examinations. FMCSA has reached its goal of at least 40,000 certified MEs signing onto the registry. All this means is that drivers or movers can now find certified medical examiners throughout the country who can perform their medical exam. FMCSA is preparing to issue a follow-on “National Registry 2” rule stating new requirements. In this case, MEs are to submit medical certificate information on a daily basis. These daily updates are sent to the FMCSA, which will then be sent to the states electronically. This process will dramatically decrease the chance of drivers falsifying medical cards.

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a division of the USDOT specializing in highway transportation. The agency's major influential activities are generally separated into two different "programs". The first is the Federal-aid Highway Program. This provides financial aid to support the construction, maintenance, and operation of the U.S. highway network. The second program, the Federal Lands Highway Program, shares a similar name with different intentions. The purpose of this program is to improve transportation involving Federal and Tribal lands. They also focus on preserving "national treasures" for the historic and beatific enjoyment for all.

The feature film "Joy Ride" premiered in 2001, portraying the story of two college-age brothers who by a CB radio while taking a road trip. Although the plot seems lighthearted, it takes a quick turn after one of the brothers attempts a prank on an unknown truck driver. They soon find out the dangerous intentions of this killer driver, who is set on getting his revenge. Seven years later in 2008 the sequel "Joy Ride 2: Dead Ahead" came out on DVD only. Similar to its predecessor, the plot involves another murdering truck driver, a.k.a "Rusty Nail". He essentially plays psychological mind games with a young couple on a road trip.

Released in 1998, the film Black Dog featured Patrick Swayze as a truck driver who made it out of prison. However, his life of crime continued, as he was manipulated into the transportation of illegal guns. Writer Scott Doviak has described the movie as a "high-octane riff on White Line Fever" as well as "a throwback to the trucker movies of the 70s".

1941 was a tough era to live through. Yet, President Roosevelt appointed a special committee to explore the idea of a "national inter-regional highway" system. Unfortunately, the committee's progress came to a halt with the rise of the World War II. After the war was over, the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1944 authorized the designation of what are not termed 'Interstate Highways'. However, he did not include any funding program to build such highways. With limited resources came limited progress until President Dwight D. Eisenhower came along in 1954. He renewed interest in the 1954 plan. Although, this began and long and bitter debate between various interests. Generally, the opposing sides were considering where such funding would come from such as rail, truck, tire, oil, and farm groups. All who would overpay for the new highways and how.

Moving companies that operate within the borders of a particular state are usually regulated by the state DOT. Sometimes the public utility commission in that state will take care of it. This only applies to some of the U.S. states such as in California (California Public Utilities Commission) or Texas (Texas Department of Motor Vehicles. However, no matter what state you are in it is always best to make sure you are compliant with that state