Compass Relocation

USDOT None
17000 Foltz Pkwy
Strongsville, OH 44149
Strongsville
Ohio
Contact Phone: (800) 545-5763
Additional Phone: (330) 453-3070
Company Site: http://www.shaheenmoving.com/

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On time and exceptionally proficient! I suggest these folks at whatever time. Extraordinary service and will utilize them once more.

Did You Know

QuestionDuring the latter part of the 20th century, we saw a decline of the trucking culture.Coinciding with this decline was a decline of the image of truck drivers, as they becamenegativelystigmatized.As a result of such negativity, it makes sense that truck drivers werefrequentlyportrayed as the "bad guy(s)" in movies.

QuestionIn some states, a business route is designated by adding the letter "B" after the number instead of placing a "Business" sign above it. For example, Arkansas signs US business route 71 as "US 71B". On some route shields and road signs, the word "business" is shortened to just "BUS". This abbreviation is rare and usually avoided to prevent confusion with bus routes.

Question

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period.At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.
The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty tobe usedfor meals and rest breaks.This meant that the weekly maxwas limitedto 60 hours over 7 days (non-dailydrivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

Question

The Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula is a mathematical formula used in the United Statesto determine the appropriate gross weight for a long distance moving vehicle, based on the axle number and spacing. Enforced bythe Department of Transportation upon long-haul truck drivers, it is used as a means of preventing heavy vehicles from damaging roads and bridges.This is especially in particular to the total weight of a loaded truck, whetherbeing usedfor commercial moving services or for long distance moving services in general.
According to the Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula, the total weight of a loaded truck (tractor and trailer, 5-axle rig) cannot exceed 80,000 lbs in the United States.Under ordinary circumstances, long-haul equipment trucks will weight about 15,000 kg (33,069 lbs). This leaves about 20,000 kg (44,092 lbs) of freight capacity.Likewise, a loadis limitedto the space available in the trailer,normallywith dimensions of 48 ft (14.63 m) or 53 ft (16.15 m) long, 2.6 m (102.4 in) wide, 2.7 m (8 ft 10.3 in) high and 13 ft 6 in or 4.11 m high.

QuestionLight trucksare classifiedthis way because they are car-sized, yet in the U.S. they can be no more than 6,300 kg (13,900 lb). Theseare used bynot only used by individuals but also businesses as well. In the UK they may not weigh more than 3,500 kg (7,700 lb) andare authorizedto drive with a driving license for cars.Pickup trucks, popular in North America, are most seen in North America and some regions of Latin America, Asia, and Africa.Although Europe doesn't seem to follow this trend, where the size of the commercial vehicle is most often made as vans.