Lansing Moving company logo

Lansing Moving

4/5

Membership(s) & License

LICENSE INFO:

US DOT #303197

Lansing Moving authority

Toll Free

not available

Phone

(517) 322-2234

Website

www.lansingmoving.com

Our Office

2888 S CREYTS RD

Lansing Moving 2888 S CREYTS RD

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Customers Reviews

4.0

2 Reviews

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 Abhay V

Abhay V

02/11/2016

Billy and Kevin were absolutely proficient and made an extraordinary showing. This was not a simple move. It involved moving some furniture starting with one place then onto the next, then stop at a third place, then at last achieve our destination. The group began around 10 AM and finished after 11 PM. All through the entire difficulty, them two were to a great degree quiet and never wavered or lost their grin when we rolled out little improvements amid the day. With everything taken into account, it was an incredible affair and I would exceedingly prescribe Lansing Moving.

Abigail B

Abigail B

01/29/2016

Our group was GREAT! They were brisk, proficient and cautious with every one of our effects. Jordan Moore was so useful and persistent (our moving date and stock rundown changed very and few times) - he even called us on moving day to check whether we needed sleeping pad packs for our bed. We will utilize lansing movers for our best course of action. Much obliged once more!

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did you know

Did you know?

In many countries, driving a truck requires a special driving license. The requirements and limitations vary with each different jurisdiction.

Beginning the the early 20th century, the 1920's saw several major advancements. There was improvement in rural roads which was significant for the time. The diesel engine, which are 25-40% more efficient than gas engines were also a major breakthrough. We also saw the standardization of truck and trailer sizes along with fifth wheel coupling systems. Additionally power assisted brakes and steering developed. By 1933, all states had some form of varying truck weight regulation.

Invented in 1890, the diesel engine was not an invention that became well known in popular culture. It was not until the 1930's for the United States to express further interest for diesel engines to be accepted. Gasoline engines were still in use on heavy trucks in the 1970's, while in Europe they had been entirely replaced two decades earlier.

The year 1611 marked an important time for trucks, as that is when the word originated. The usage of "truck" referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. Further extending its usage in 1771, it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads. In 1916 it became shortened, calling it a "motor truck". While since the 1930's its expanded application goes as far as to say "motor-powered load carrier".

The interstate moving industry in the United States maintains regulation by the FMCSA, which is part of the USDOT. With only a small staff (fewer than 20 people) available to patrol hundreds of moving companies, enforcement is difficult. As a result of such a small staff, there are in many cases, no regulations that qualify moving companies as 'reliable'. Without this guarantee, it is difficult to a consumer to make a choice. Although, moving companies can provide and often display a DOT license.

The American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO) was organized and founded on December 12, 1914. On November 13, 1973, the name was altered to the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. This slight change in name reflects a broadened scope of attention towards all modes of transportation. Despite the implications of the name change, most of the activities it is involved in still gravitate towards highways.

Light trucks are classified this way because they are car-sized, yet in the U.S. they can be no more than 6,300 kg (13,900 lb). These are used by not only used by individuals but also businesses as well. In the UK they may not weigh more than 3,500 kg (7,700 lb) and are authorized to drive with a driving license for cars. Pickup trucks, popular in North America, are most seen in North America and some regions of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Although Europe doesn't seem to follow this trend, where the size of the commercial vehicle is most often made as vans.