The Monster Movers

USDOT # 2184730
10 Sylvan Lane
Westport, CT 06880
Westport
Connecticut
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (203) 228-5197
Company Site: www.themonstermovers.com

Moving with The Monster Movers

The Monster Movers handles private and business moves in CT and long-remove moves all through the whole United States. We know how distressing moving can be and our accomplished, proficient and amicable teams will direct you through the moving procedure from beginning to end. We additionally offer long and transient stockpiling administrations to accomodate you're moving calendar.



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I've used Monster twice and recommended to friends who also used them. In fact, we were coordinating moving furniture between three different houses on different days, and MM handled all of it very well.

Did You Know

Question

The trucking industry has made a large historical impact since the early 20th century. It has affected the U.S. bothpoliticallyas well aseconomicallysince the notion has begun.Previous to the invention of automobiles, most freightwas moved bytrain or horse-drawn carriage. Trucks were firstexclusivelyused by the military during World War I.
After the war, construction of paved roads increased. As a result, trucking began to achieve significant popularity by the 1930's.Soon after trucking became subject to various government regulation, such as the hours of service.During the later 1950's and 1960's, trucking accelerated due to the construction of the Interstate Highway System.The Interstate Highway System is an extensive network of freeways linking major cities cross country.

QuestionAlongside the many different trailers provided are motorcycle trailers. Theyare designedto haul motorcycles behind an automobile or truck.Depending on size and capability, some trailer may be able to carry several motorcycles orperhapsjustone. Theyspecificallydesigned this trailer to meet the needs of motorcyclists. They carry motorcycles, have ramps, and include tie-downs.There may be a utility trailer adaptedpermanentlyoroccasionallyto haul one or more motorcycles.

QuestionIn the United States, the Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986 established minimum requirements that must be met when a state issues a commercial driver's license CDL. It specifies the following types of license: - Class A CDL drivers. Drive vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater, or any combination of vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater when towing a trailer weighing more than 10,000 pounds. Transports quantities of hazardous materials that require warning placards under Department of Public Safety regulations. - Class A Driver License permits. Is a step in preparation for Class A drivers to become a Commercial Driver. - Class B CDL driver. Class B is designed to transport 16 or more passengers (including driver) or more than 8 passengers (including the driver) for compensation. This includes, but is not limited to, tow trucks, tractor trailers, and buses.

Question

The FMCSA has established rules to maintain and regulate the safety of the trucking industry.According to FMCSA rules, driving a goods-carrying CMV more than 11 hours or to drive after having been on duty for 14 hours, is illegal.Due to such heavy driving, they need a break to complete other tasks such as loading and unloading cargo, stopping for gas and other required vehicle inspections, as well as non-working duties such as meal and rest breaks.The 3-hour difference between the 11-hour driving limit and 14 hour on-duty limit gives drivers time to take care of such duties.In addition, after completing an 11 to 14 hour on duty period, the driver muchbe allowed10 hours off-duty.

QuestionIn 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.