Advanced Relocation Systems Inc

USDOT # 1469944
11517 North Broadway EXT
Oklahoma City, OK 73114
Oklahoma City
Contact Phone: 912-233-1313
Additional Phone: (405) 775-5225
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QuestionTrucks and cars have much in commonmechanicallyas well asancestrally.One link between them is the steam-powered fardier Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot, who built it in 1769. Unfortunately for him, steam trucks were notreallycommon until the mid 1800's. While looking at thispractically, it would be much harder to have a steam truck. This ismostlydue to the fact that the roads of the timewere builtfor horse and carriages. Steam truckswere leftto very short hauls, usually from a factory to the nearest railway station.In 1881, the first semi-trailer appeared, and it was in fact towed by a steam tractor manufactured by De Dion-Bouton.Steam-powered truckswere soldin France and in the United States,apparentlyuntil the eve of World War I. Also, at the beginning of World War II in the United Kingdom, theywere knownas 'steam wagons'.


Very light trucks.Popular in Europe and Asia, many mini-trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles, usually with monocoque bodies.Specialized designs withsubstantialframes such as the Italian Piaggio shown hereare basedupon Japanese designs (in this case by Daihatsu) and are popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities that often have very narrow alleyways. Regardless of the name, these small trucks serve a wide range of uses.In Japan, theyare regulatedunder the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break on taxes for buying a smaller and less-powerful vehicle (currently, the engineis limitedto 660 ccs {0.66L} displacement). These vehiclesare usedas on-road utility vehicles in Japan.These Japanese-made mini trucks thatwere manufacturedfor on-road use are competing with off-road ATVs in the United States, and import regulationsrequirethat these mini trucks have a 25 mph (40 km/h) speed governor as theyare classifiedas low-speed vehicles.These vehicles have found uses in construction, large campuses (government, university, and industrial), agriculture, cattle ranches, amusement parks, and replacements for golf carts.Major mini truck manufacturers and their brands: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishi Minicab, Subaru Sambar, Suzuki Carry
As with many things in Europe and Asia, the illusion of delicacy and proper manners always seems to attract tourists.Popular in Europe and Asia, mini trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles with monochrome bodies.Such specialized designs with such great frames such as the Italian Piaggio, based upon Japanese designs. In this case itwas basedupon Japanese designs made by Daihatsu.These are very popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities, which often have very narrow alleyways.Despite whatever name theyare called, these very light trucks serve a wide variety of purposes.
Yet, in Japan theyare regulatedunder the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break in taxes for buying a small and less-powerful vehicle. Currently, the engineis limitedto 660 cc [0.66L] displacement. These vehicles beganbeing usedas on-road utility vehicles in Japan.Classified as a low speed vehicle, these Japanese-made mini truckswere manufacturedfor on-road use for competing the the off-road ATVs in the United States. Import regulationsrequirethat the mini trucks have a 25 mph (40km/h) speed governor. Again, this is because they are low speed vehicles.
However, these vehicles have foundnumerousamounts of ways to help the community.They invest money into the government, universities, amusement parks, and replacements for golf cars.They have some major Japanese mini truck manufacturarers as well as brands such as: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishit Minicab, Subaru Sambar, and Suzuki Carry.

QuestionAs of January 1, 2000, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA)was establishedas its own separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation. This came about under the "Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999".The FMCSAis basedin Washington, D.C., employing more than 1,000 people throughout all 50 States, including in the District of Columbia.Their staff dedicates themselves to the improvement of safety among commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and to saving lives.

QuestionDOT officers of each state are generally in charge of the enforcement of the Hours of Service (HOS). These are sometimes checked when CMVs pass through weigh stations. Drivers found to be in violation of the HOS canbe forcedto stop driving for a certain period of time. This, in turn, maynegativelyaffect the motor carrier's safety rating. Requests to change the HOS are a source of debate. Unfortunately, many surveysindicatedriversroutinelyget away with violating the HOS.Such facts have started yet another debate on whether motor carriers shouldbe requiredto us EOBRs in their vehicles.Relying on paper-based log books does not always seem to enforce the HOS law put in place for the safety of everyone.

QuestionThroughout the United States, bypass routes are a special type of route mostcommonlyused on an alternative routing of a highway around a town.Specificallywhen the main route of the highway goes through the town.Originally, these routeswere designatedas "truck routes" as a means to divert trucking traffic away from towns.However, this name was later changed by AASHTO in 1959 to what we now call a "bypass".Many "truck routes" continue to remain regardless that the mainline of the highway prohibits trucks.