IPS Movers NYC

USDOT # 2998699
1835 Highland Ave,
New Hyde Park, NY 11040
New Hyde Park
New York
Contact Phone: 516-492-3465
Additional Phone: (516) 305-5211
Company Site: www.ipsmoversnyc.com

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Integrated Professional Solution LLC is based is New York.
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QuestionIn 1978 Sylvester Stallone starred in the film "F.I.S.T.". The story islooselybased on the 'Teamsters Union'. This union is a labor union which includes truck drivers as well as its then president, Jimmy Hoffa.

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Very light trucks.Popular in Europe and Asia, many mini-trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles, usually with monocoque bodies.Specialized designs withsubstantialframes such as the Italian Piaggio shown hereare basedupon Japanese designs (in this case by Daihatsu) and are popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities that often have very narrow alleyways. Regardless of the name, these small trucks serve a wide range of uses.In Japan, theyare regulatedunder the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break on taxes for buying a smaller and less-powerful vehicle (currently, the engineis limitedto 660 ccs {0.66L} displacement). These vehiclesare usedas on-road utility vehicles in Japan.These Japanese-made mini trucks thatwere manufacturedfor on-road use are competing with off-road ATVs in the United States, and import regulationsrequirethat these mini trucks have a 25 mph (40 km/h) speed governor as theyare classifiedas low-speed vehicles.These vehicles have found uses in construction, large campuses (government, university, and industrial), agriculture, cattle ranches, amusement parks, and replacements for golf carts.Major mini truck manufacturers and their brands: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishi Minicab, Subaru Sambar, Suzuki Carry
As with many things in Europe and Asia, the illusion of delicacy and proper manners always seems to attract tourists.Popular in Europe and Asia, mini trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles with monochrome bodies.Such specialized designs with such great frames such as the Italian Piaggio, based upon Japanese designs. In this case itwas basedupon Japanese designs made by Daihatsu.These are very popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities, which often have very narrow alleyways.Despite whatever name theyare called, these very light trucks serve a wide variety of purposes.
Yet, in Japan theyare regulatedunder the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break in taxes for buying a small and less-powerful vehicle. Currently, the engineis limitedto 660 cc [0.66L] displacement. These vehicles beganbeing usedas on-road utility vehicles in Japan.Classified as a low speed vehicle, these Japanese-made mini truckswere manufacturedfor on-road use for competing the the off-road ATVs in the United States. Import regulationsrequirethat the mini trucks have a 25 mph (40km/h) speed governor. Again, this is because they are low speed vehicles.
However, these vehicles have foundnumerousamounts of ways to help the community.They invest money into the government, universities, amusement parks, and replacements for golf cars.They have some major Japanese mini truck manufacturarers as well as brands such as: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishit Minicab, Subaru Sambar, and Suzuki Carry.

QuestionThe interstate moving industry in the United States maintains regulation by the FMCSA, which is part of the USDOT.With only a small staff (fewer than 20 people) available to patrol hundreds of moving companies, enforcement is difficult.As a result of such a small staff, there arein many cases, no regulations that qualify moving companies as 'reliable'. Without this guarantee, it is difficult to a consumer to make a choice. Although, moving companies can provide and often display a DOT license.

QuestionSignage of business routes varies, depending on the type of route they are derived from. Business routes paralleling U.S. and state highways usually have exactly the same shield shapes and nearly the same overall appearance as the routes they parallel, with a rectangular plate reading "BUSINESS" placed above the shield (either supplementing or replacing the directional plate, depending on the preference of the road agency). In order to better identify and differentiate alternate routes from the routes they parallel, some states such as Maryland are beginning to use green shields for business routes off U.S. highways. In addition, Maryland uses a green shield for business routes off state highways with the word "BUSINESS" in place of "MARYLAND" is used for a state route.

QuestionWith the onset of trucking culture, truck drivers often became portrayed as protagonists in popular media.Author Shane Hamilton, who wrote "Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy", focuses on truck driving.He explores the history of trucking and while connecting it development in the trucking industry.It is important to note, as Hamilton discusses the trucking industry and how it helps the so-called big-box stores dominate the U.S. marketplace. Hamiltoncertainlytakes an interesting perspectivehistoricallyspeaking.