You Move Me Portland company logo

You Move Me Portland

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Membership(s) & License

LICENSE INFO:

US DOT #2388358

You Move Me Portland authority

Toll Free

not available

Phone

(619) 540-5666

Website

www.youmoveme.com/us/portland

Our Office

4001 MAIN ST

You Move Me Portland 4001 MAIN ST

Moving to Portland is stressful, and part of that stress can be finding a moving company and figuring out who to trust in the area.

You Move Me Portland's focus is on making the moving process as pleasant and hassle free as possible.

From the booking process itself, to our reliable Portland movers showing up on time, to having up front moving rates and having friendly personable drivers who work efficiently, we plan to make each step of the moving process easier.

We move you, not just your boxes! Here's how...

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Customers Reviews

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1 Reviews

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 Annie A.

Annie A.

02/03/2016

We purchased the cry coupon and utilized for a cross-town move. Everything went well; we were pressed and they were quick, so it wound up being entirely shabby. They severed a wheel some office hardware, however then, I've never had a move where no less than one thing wasn't tore or busted (notwithstanding when I do it without anyone's help) so I figure I'll give them a pass. Isaiah and Drew were on-time, fast, and expert. I would absolutely procure them once more.

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did you know

Did you know?

In many countries, driving a truck requires a special driving license. The requirements and limitations vary with each different jurisdiction.

In 1978 Sylvester Stallone starred in the film "F.I.S.T.". The story is loosely based on the 'Teamsters Union'. This union is a labor union which includes truck drivers as well as its then president, Jimmy Hoffa.

The year 1611 marked an important time for trucks, as that is when the word originated. The usage of "truck" referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. Further extending its usage in 1771, it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads. In 1916 it became shortened, calling it a "motor truck". While since the 1930's its expanded application goes as far as to say "motor-powered load carrier".

Popular among campers is the use of lightweight trailers, such as aerodynamic trailers. These can be towed by a small car, such as the BMW Air Camper. They are built with the intent to lower the tow of the vehicle, thus minimizing drag.

Public transportation is vital to a large part of society and is in dire need of work and attention. In 2010, the DOT awarded $742.5 million in funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to 11 transit projects. The awardees specifically focused light rail projects. One includes both a commuter rail extension and a subway project in New York City. The public transportation New York City has to offer is in need of some TLC. Another is working on a rapid bus transit system in Springfield, Oregon. The funds also subsidize a heavy rail project in northern Virginia. This finally completes the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority's Metro Silver Line, connecting to Washington, D.C., and the Washington Dulles International Airport. This is important because the DOT has previously agreed to subsidize the Silver Line construction to Reston, Virginia.

The basics of all trucks are not difficult, as they share common construction. They are generally made of chassis, a cab, an area for placing cargo or equipment, axles, suspension, road wheels, and engine and a drive train. Pneumatic, hydraulic, water, and electrical systems may also be present. Many also tow one or more trailers or semi-trailers, which also vary in multiple ways but are similar as well.

The decade of the 70's in the United States was a memorable one, especially for the notion of truck driving. This seemed to dramatically increase popularity among trucker culture. Throughout this era, and even in today's society, truck drivers are romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws. These stereotypes were due to their use of Citizens Band (CB) radios to swap information with other drivers. Information regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. The general public took an interest in the truckers 'way of life' as well. Both drivers and the public took interest in plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and CB slang.