Fettes Transportation

USDOT # 2578221
1830 4TH Ave NW BLDG B
West Fargo, ND 58078
West Fargo
North Dakota
Contact Phone: (800) 325-3696
Additional Phone: (701) 277-3631
Company Site: www.fettesmovers.com

Moving with Fettes Transportation

Fettes Transportation Systems is a moving organization in Fargo, North Dakota offering full-administration moving, capacity, and dispersion administrations for private and business customers.We are an approved, nearby specialists for the national north American Van Lines moving company.Our business has been privately claimed and worked for over for more than fifty years.Whether you are moving to, from, or inside of the Fargo-Moorhead zone, we can help you through the whole process.We joyfully serve both extensive and little customers.For a free, online appraisal, click here or call us at (701) 277-3631.


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Extraordinary moving Company! They were on time and expert. The proprietor was exceptionally decent on the telephone, and the movers took care of my television and electric leaning back lounge chair with consideration. They set up everything back together consummately, and ensured my furniture was put precisely where I needed it.

Extraordinary moving Company! They were on time and expert. The proprietor was exceptionally decent on the telephone, and the movers took care of my television and electric leaning back lounge chair with consideration. They set up everything back together consummately, and ensured my furniture was put precisely where I needed it.

Did You Know

QuestionAnother film released in 1975, White Line Fever, also involved truck drivers. It tells the story of a Vietnam War veteran who returns home to take over his father's trucking business. But, he soon finds that corrupt shippers are trying to force him to carry illegal contraband.While endorsing another negative connotation towards the trucking industry, it does portray truck drivers with a certain wanderlust.

QuestionTrucks and cars have much in commonmechanicallyas well asancestrally.One link between them is the steam-powered fardier Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot, who built it in 1769. Unfortunately for him, steam trucks were notreallycommon until the mid 1800's. While looking at thispractically, it would be much harder to have a steam truck. This ismostlydue to the fact that the roads of the timewere builtfor horse and carriages. Steam truckswere leftto very short hauls, usually from a factory to the nearest railway station.In 1881, the first semi-trailer appeared, and it was in fact towed by a steam tractor manufactured by De Dion-Bouton.Steam-powered truckswere soldin France and in the United States,apparentlyuntil the eve of World War I. Also, at the beginning of World War II in the United Kingdom, theywere knownas 'steam wagons'.

QuestionIn 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.

QuestionTracing the origins of particular words can be quite different with so many words in the English Dictionary.Some say the word "truck" might have come from a back-formation of "truckle", meaning "small wheel" or "pulley". In turn, both sources emanate from the Greektrokhos(τροχός), meaning "wheel", fromtrekhein(τρέχειν, "to run").

QuestionLight trucksare classifiedthis way because they are car-sized, yet in the U.S. they can be no more than 6,300 kg (13,900 lb). Theseare used bynot only used by individuals but also businesses as well. In the UK they may not weigh more than 3,500 kg (7,700 lb) andare authorizedto drive with a driving license for cars.Pickup trucks, popular in North America, are most seen in North America and some regions of Latin America, Asia, and Africa.Although Europe doesn't seem to follow this trend, where the size of the commercial vehicle is most often made as vans.