CA Number

$279.00 Only

Product Code: 27

13 Reviews

Product Description:

  • CA Number is Carrier Identification Number in California
  • Apply for identification number
  • For In-State California Carriers & Commercial Vehicle Operating
  • We Obtain CA Number from California Highway Patrol (CHP)
  • Trucks of Two or more Axle with over gross vehicle weight 10K Lb
See Full Description
Check Customer Reviews

All About the CA Number




What Is a California DOT Number?



The California DOT number refers to the official California Department of Transportation Number. This number gets assigned by the CHP: California Highway Patrol. If you are a motor carrier within California state lines, you have to have a CA DOT number. The rules and regulations vary for in-state and out-of-state carriers.



California DOT Numbers for In-State Carriers & Out-of-State Carriers



The California DOT number process is different for each type of carrier depending on their California Intrastate authority. Let’s begin with in-state carriers. These are people that run commercial vehicle operations within the state of California. In-state carriers have to have the following three articles.


1. A CA number.
2. A USDOT number.
3. A Motor Carrier Permit.

In-state CA carriers were not required to have a USDOT number until 2016. Many out-of-state carriers must have the following three articles. Otherwise, they cannot enter the state of California. 1. A Motor Carrier Permit. 2. A CA DOT number. 3. A USDOT number. 




How to Get a California DOT Number for Trucks



Sometimes out-of-state carriers have only needed a USDOT number to drive through California. That’s why it’s best to contact the California Department of Transportation if you are unsure what you need. This applies to both in-state CA carriers and out-of-state carriers. The DOT will examine your carrier and let you know what your drivers must-have. The CA DOT will also walk you through the process of getting a California DOT Number for trucks. So, how can you begin this process? By completing a California Carrier DOT Identification Number Application. The DOT can provide you with that application on weekdays. 

When it comes to the California registration process, you will need a federal ID number. This refers to your federal Department of Transportation (DOT) Number. And it applies to all organizations with transportation services as a motor carrier. Do you need to get a USDOT number? If so, you can contact the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. The FMCSA issues all USDOT numbers. You can apply for your USDOT number on the FMCSA website.


DOT Moving Authority phone(702) 333-2430


How to Display Your California DOT Carrier Identification Number/Name/Trademark



California law states that carriers must display DOT number information at all times. That's why the information has to go on both sides of the vehicle. In fact, trademarks and names have to go on the sides of all trucks. The name and trademark have to appear legible from 50 feet away. This applies only for daylight hours and not nighttime. The DOT name/trademark should refer to the person that has the authority to operate the vehicle. But there is one exception. Sometimes the lessee or lessor’s name can get featured on the DOT name/trademark. If there is a fleet of vehicles, make sure you display the authority over the combination of vehicles. 




CALIFORNIA DOT MOTOR VEHICLE PERMIT/CA IDENTIFICATION NUMBERS



The CA number decals must get displayed on low areas of cab doors. Our firm recommends using two-inch letters in bold. You should also use an easy-to-read font. These are the four fonts that our team recommends.

1. Arial.
2. Century Gothic.
3. Cooper.
4. Times New Roman.

When it comes to the name, place it on the upper or mid part of the truck doors. You can use the same lettering style and size as you do for the number decals. You can also put your logo on the doors of the trucks. If the vehicle is light-colored, use dark or black truck number decals. If the vehicle is dark-colored, use light to white truck number decals. Feel free to contact our firm if you need help securing USDOT number decals. We can help you find high-quality, long-lasting decals to stay in good standing.


Who needs a motor carrier permit in California?


The state of California has a DOT rule for every commercial motor vehicle.


So who needs a motor carrier permit in California?

Any commercial motor vehicle with a GVW above 10,000 pounds must have something. It's called a California Motor Vehicle Permit. The number for the permit needs to get displayed in permanent lettering on all trucks.

The California Motor Vehicle Permit number often gets referred to as the CA number. Your official company name must also get placed on the door of the truck in a permanent manner. But there is one alternative. Instead, you can place the official company name on the box of the truck. Remember what your official company name is. It is the same exact name that’s written on the vehicle registration. 



The California motor carrier permit serves as an official DMV document. It adheres to the Motor Carrier Services branch of the DMV. Having a CA number proves that you've registered with the DMV. Plus, the permit proves something else. It is that a carrier has met all requirements to operate commercial vehicles. In other words, the permit’s needed to get your fleet trucking across California highways. The intra state permit number permits will display the date when your CA number will expire. Every company gets provided with one CA number. That number gets used for every single vehicle per carrier. If you have never had a number before, you might need to contact the California Highway Patrol. They will help you fill out a Motor Carrier Profile.




Our Firm Is Ready to Assist You With All Your California DOT Number Needs


DOT Moving Authority phone(702) 333-2430

Getting a California DOT number does not need to feel like a hassle or crisis. And with our firm on your side, it won’t be at all. Our team specializes in all aspects of the CA authority registration. The mission of our firm is to help California trucking companies get on the road ASAP. We will make sure your California carrier organization adheres to all regulations.

Whether DOT or FMCSA, we've got you covered. Our staff can do anything from helping you with a CA number search to filling out your CA DOT application. There is no compliance paper or registration form that we are not familiar with. And we’re only one phone call away at any time. We look forward to helping you with all your California DOT needs and USDOT number California.

Customer Reviews

Kevin Tesseyman

07/05/2021

I called Moving Authority to comply with the California DOT Number for my trucks. I tried to do it myself, but I felt it a little complicated. I supplied some data, and the specialists did the rest. I would use their services again if necessary.

Terri Finley

06/07/2021

We needed the ca dot number for our new route. I contacted Moving Authority, and they offered me the California DOT Number service. I decided to go on. That was a wise choice. I can now carry through California, and my business is growing.

Nap Saxton

06/01/2021

I contacted Moving Authority to fill out the California Carrier DOT Identification Number Application for my company. As soon as I called them, they explained every detail for securing the CA Number. They were very patient and helpful.

Garvy Hodkinson

05/19/2021

Looking for options to start my trucking business in California, I found that I needed the CA Number in addition to the essential permits. After a couple of online searches, I called Moving Authority. They immediately gave me the attention I needed, and I now have my CA number. Thank you.

Michael Attewell

05/04/2021

Thanks, Moving Authority. I got my CHP CA number. They filled my Dot number application in a snap. I will keep on using their services in the future.

COLIN WILBUR

04/20/2021

Our CA number renewal was quick and painless. The service was also outstanding. A+++

Johana

04/06/2021

I'm so please with the CA Number renewal Moving Authority provided us with. What I most liked is they took care of filling out our CA DOT application right away. The people at Moving Authority gave us excellent service. I am very grateful to them!

Arther Holby

03/24/2021

Moving Authority experts did the related paperwork. It was a pretty quick process.

Aldo Duce

03/02/2021

I advise Moving Authority Company to process everything related to CHP CA Number. They're expeditious.

Aldis Crocker

02/15/2021

The Moving Authority experienced team assisted me in getting the California DOT number in such a short term. We can now keep on working in all the states. We appreciate it.

Gain Logistics

01/24/2021

Finally, you are a company that knows how to answer all my questions. A very knowledgeable staff helped me with the California trucking permit number. TY

Billy E.

10/06/2020

Highly recommend.

Brad T.

10/05/2020

California DOT number really is a big help when your crossing California state lines.

/

Please Write Your Review Here

In 2009, the book 'Trucking Country: The Road to America's Walmart Economy' debuted, written by author Shane Hamilton. This novel explores the interesting history of trucking and connects certain developments. Particularly how such development in the trucking industry have helped the so-called big-box stored. Examples of these would include Walmart or Target, they dominate the retail sector of the U.S. economy. Yet, Hamilton connects historical and present-day evidence that connects such correlations.

With the partial deregulation of the trucking industry in 1980 by the Motor Carrier Act, trucking companies increased. The workforce was drastically de-unionized. As a result, drivers received a lower pay overall. Losing its spotlight in the popular culture, trucking had become less intimate as some unspoken competition broke out. However, the deregulation only increased the competition and productivity with the trucking industry as a whole. This was beneficial to the America consumer by reducing costs. In 1982 the Surface Transportation Assistance Act established a federal minimum truck weight limits. Thus, trucks were finally standardized truck size and weight limits across the country. This was also put in to place so that across country traffic on the Interstate Highways resolved the issue of the 'barrier states'.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 40 million United States citizens have moved annually over the last decade. Of those people who have moved in the United States, 84.5% of them have moved within their own state, 12.5% have moved to another state, and 2.3% have moved to another country.

Trucks and cars have much in common mechanically as well as ancestrally. One link between them is the steam-powered fardier Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot, who built it in 1769. Unfortunately for him, steam trucks were not really common until the mid 1800's. While looking at this practically, it would be much harder to have a steam truck. This is mostly due to the fact that the roads of the time were built for horse and carriages. Steam trucks were left to very short hauls, usually from a factory to the nearest railway station. In 1881, the first semi-trailer appeared, and it was in fact towed by a steam tractor manufactured by De Dion-Bouton. Steam-powered trucks were sold in France and in the United States, apparently until the eve of World War I. Also, at the beginning of World War II in the United Kingdom, they were known as 'steam wagons'.

The year 1611 marked an important time for trucks, as that is when the word originated. The usage of "truck" referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. Further extending its usage in 1771, it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads. In 1916 it became shortened, calling it a "motor truck". While since the 1930's its expanded application goes as far as to say "motor-powered load carrier".

Within the world of transportation, bypass routes are often very controversial. This is mostly due to the fact that they require the building of a road carrying heavy traffic where no road existed before. This has created conflict among society thus creating a divergence between those in support of bypasses and those who are opposed. Supporters believe they reduce congestion in built up areas. Those in opposition do not believe in developing (often rural) undeveloped land. In addition, the cities that are bypassed may also oppose such a project as reduced traffic may, in turn, reduce and damage business.

A relatable reality t.v. show to the industry is the show Ice Road Truckers, which premiered season 3 on the History Channel in 2009. The show documents the lives of truck drivers working the scary Dalton Highway in Alaska. Following drivers as they compete to see which one of them can haul the most loads before the end of the season. It'll grab you with its mechanical problems that so many have experienced and as you watch them avoid the pitfalls of dangerous and icy roads!

Public transportation is vital to a large part of society and is in dire need of work and attention. In 2010, the DOT awarded $742.5 million in funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to 11 transit projects. The awardees specifically focused light rail projects. One includes both a commuter rail extension and a subway project in New York City. The public transportation New York City has to offer is in need of some TLC. Another is working on a rapid bus transit system in Springfield, Oregon. The funds also subsidize a heavy rail project in northern Virginia. This finally completes the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority's Metro Silver Line, connecting to Washington, D.C., and the Washington Dulles International Airport. This is important because the DOT has previously agreed to subsidize the Silver Line construction to Reston, Virginia.

The term "lorry" has an ambiguous origin, but it is likely that its roots were in the rail transport industry. This is where the word is known to have been used in 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage) specifically a large flat wagon. It may derive from the verb lurry, which means to pull or tug, of uncertain origin. It's expanded meaning was much more exciting as "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods", and has been in usage since 1911. Previously, unbeknownst to most, the word "lorry" was used for a fashion of big horse-drawn goods wagon.

Implemented in 2014, the National Registry, requires all Medical Examiners (ME) who conduct physical examinations and issue medical certifications for interstate CMV drivers to complete training on FMCSA’s physical qualification standards, must pass a certification test. This is to demonstrate competence through periodic training and testing. CMV drivers whose medical certifications expire must use MEs on the National Registry for their examinations. FMCSA has reached its goal of at least 40,000 certified MEs signing onto the registry. All this means is that drivers or movers can now find certified medical examiners throughout the country who can perform their medical exam. FMCSA is preparing to issue a follow-on “National Registry 2” rule stating new requirements. In this case, MEs are to submit medical certificate information on a daily basis. These daily updates are sent to the FMCSA, which will then be sent to the states electronically. This process will dramatically decrease the chance of drivers falsifying medical cards.

The word cargo is in reference to particular goods that are generally used for commercial gain. Cargo transportation is generally meant to mean by ship, boat, or plane. However, the term now applies to all types of freight, now including goods carried by train, van, or truck. This term is now used in the case of goods in the cold-chain, as perishable inventory is always cargo in transport towards its final home. Even when it is held in climate-controlled facilities, it is important to remember perishable goods or inventory have a short life.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) issues Hours of Service regulations. At the same time, they govern the working hours of anyone operating a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in the United States. Such regulations apply to truck drivers, commercial and city bus drivers, and school bus drivers who operate CMVs. With these rules in place, the number of daily and weekly hours spent driving and working is limited. The FMCSA regulates the minimum amount of time drivers must spend resting between driving shifts. In regards to intrastate commerce, the respective state's regulations apply.

In 1893, the Office of Road Inquiry (ORI) was established as an organization. However, in 1905 the name was changed to the Office Public Records (OPR). The organization then went on to become a division of the United States Department of Agriculture. As seen throughout history, organizations seem incapable of maintaining permanent names. So, the organization's name was changed three more times, first in 1915 to the Bureau of Public Roads and again in 1939 to the Public Roads Administration (PRA). Yet again, the name was later shifted to the Federal Works Agency, although it was abolished in 1949. Finally, in 1949, the name reverted to the Bureau of Public Roads, falling under the Department of Commerce. With so many name changes, it can be difficult to keep up to date with such organizations. This is why it is most important to research and educate yourself on such matters.

Although there are exceptions, city routes are interestingly most often found in the Midwestern area of the United States. Though they essentially serve the same purpose as business routes, they are different. They feature "CITY" signs as opposed to "BUSINESS" signs above or below route shields. Many of these city routes are becoming irrelevant for today's transportation. Due to this, they are being eliminated in favor of the business route designation.

In 1984 the animated TV series The Transformers told the story of a group of extraterrestrial humanoid robots. However, it just so happens that they disguise themselves as automobiles. Their leader of the Autobots clan, Optimus Prime, is depicted as an awesome semi-truck.

The decade of the 70's in the United States was a memorable one, especially for the notion of truck driving. This seemed to dramatically increase popularity among trucker culture. Throughout this era, and even in today's society, truck drivers are romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws. These stereotypes were due to their use of Citizens Band (CB) radios to swap information with other drivers. Information regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. The general public took an interest in the truckers 'way of life' as well. Both drivers and the public took interest in plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and CB slang.

By the time 2006 came, there were over 26 million trucks on the United States roads, each hauling over 10 billion short tons of freight (9.1 billion long tons). This was representing almost 70% of the total volume of freight. When, as a driver or an automobile drivers, most automobile drivers are largely unfamiliar with large trucks. As as a result of these unaware truck drivers and their massive 18-wheeler's numerous blind spots. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has determined that 70% of fatal automobile/tractor trailer accident happen for a reason. That being the result of "unsafe actions of automobile drivers". People, as well as drivers, need to realize the dangers of such large trucks and pay more attention. Likewise for truck drivers as well.

In the United States and Canada, the cost for long-distance moves is generally determined by a few factors. The first is the weight of the items to be moved and the distance it will go. Cost is also based on how quickly the items are to be moved, as well as the time of the year or month which the move occurs. In the United Kingdom and Australia, it's quite different. They base price on the volume of the items as opposed to their weight. Keep in mind some movers may offer flat rate pricing.