Champion Moving and Storage

USDOT # 1434489
100 Owens Rd
Brockport, NY 14420
Brockport
New York
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (585) 431-0011
Company Site: www.champion-moving.com

Moving with Champion Moving and Storage

Whether you’re looking to relocate your family across the country, or move your business across town, you need a moving company that is reliable, dependable, and predictable. Having movers you can rely on to transport your belongings safely and efficiently is of the utmost importance, so we strive to provide the highest quality service for residents in and around Brockport and Rochester, NY. Champion Moving & Storage is a full-service moving company providing moving, storage, and various third party services to customers across Western New York and beyond. Our services are not limited to one specialty. Our 25+ years of experience have given us the knowledge and towing capacity to help you move every facet of your home or business, including cars, boats, medical equipment, office furniture and equipment, even hot tubs and pools. Our team is trained to handle any size move and will help you successfully relocate, no matter your situation.



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Your Champion Moving and Storage Reviews

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Exceptionally suggested! Amid the move they were amazingly proficient and moved things at a rate speedier than I anticipated. They dealt with my assets particularly with delicate boxes and wrapped my furniture things (lounge chair, racks, and sleeping cushion). Would run with them again for my best course of action.

The movers that came were very professional and the total cost came in under the estimate. Couldn't have been happier with these guys.

Friendly, efficient and affordable service. Will use them again in the future. Great job guys!

Did You Know

QuestionThe public idea of the trucking industry in the United States popular culture has gone through many transformations.However, images of the masculine side of trucking are a common theme throughout time.The 1940's first made truckers popular, with their songs and movies about truck drivers. Then in the 1950's theywere depictedas heroes of the road, living a life of freedom on the open road.Trucking culture peaked in the 1970's as theywere glorifiedas modern days cowboys, outlaws, and rebels. Since then the portrayal has come with a more negative connotation as we see in the 1990's.Unfortunately, the depiction of truck drivers went from such a positive depiction to that of troubled serial killers.

QuestionAnother film released in 1975, White Line Fever, also involved truck drivers. It tells the story of a Vietnam War veteran who returns home to take over his father's trucking business. But, he soon finds that corrupt shippers are trying to force him to carry illegal contraband.While endorsing another negative connotation towards the trucking industry, it does portray truck drivers with a certain wanderlust.

QuestionAs of January 1, 2000, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA)was establishedas its own separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation. This came about under the "Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999".The FMCSAis basedin Washington, D.C., employing more than 1,000 people throughout all 50 States, including in the District of Columbia.Their staff dedicates themselves to the improvement of safety among commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and to saving lives.

QuestionWords have always had a different meaning or havebeen usedinterchangeablywith others across all cultures.In the United States, Canada, and the Philippines the word "truck" ismostlyreserved for larger vehicles.Although in Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa, the word "truck" is generally reserved for large vehicles. In Australia and New Zealand, a pickup truck is usually called a ute, short for "utility". While over in South Africa it is called a bakkie (Afrikaans: "small open container").The United Kingdom, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Ireland, and Hong Kong use the "lorry" instead of truck, but only for medium and heavy types.

QuestionHeavy trucks. A cement mixer is an example of Class 8 heavy trucks. Heavy trucks are the largest on-road trucks, Class 8. These include vocational applications such as heavy dump trucks, concrete pump trucks, and refuse hauling, as well as ubiquitous long-haul 6×4 and 4x2 tractor units. Road damage and wear increase very rapidly with the axle weight. The axle weight is the truck weight divided by the number of axles, but the actual axle weight depends on the position of the load over the axles. The number of steering axles and the suspension type also influence the amount of the road wear. In many countries with good roads, a six-axle truck may have a maximum weight over 50 tons (49 long tons; 55 short tons).