Wood Bros. Moving

USDOT None
3607 Lafayette Rd
Portsmouth, NH 03801
Portsmouth
New Hampshire
Contact Phone: 1-800-722-3033
Additional Phone: (603) 436-2725
Company Site: www.woodbrosmoving.com

Moving with Wood Bros. Moving

The Wood family first showed up North America some time during the late 1700s. It is said that they came from Berwickshire, Scotland. During the late 1800s, Harry Roy Wood left Nova Scotia and came to Arlington Massachusett, where he proceeeded to birth six young men and a grandson named Donald. His intention, as was the intention of many at that time, was to put the kids to work. Harry began to relocate individuals all across the nation in engine trucks out which started from Arlington. At roughly this same time, Rufus and Burt Wood were starting up the branch known as Wood Bros. Moving and Storage of Portsmouth, New Hampshire in 1888.

Rufus started to manage his dad's business from the age of 17 all the way up until he resigned at 65 years of age in the year 1956, at that point he sold the business entity to his representative, Ted Walsh. Ted relocated the entire organization to its present area at on Lafayette Road in Portsmouth New Hampshire.


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Your Wood Bros. Moving Reviews

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Wood Brothers moved me and my family various years prior from Massachusetts to New Hampshire. They were a joy working with. They were exceptionally proficient, stuck with their quote, and moved our 5-room home quickly, productively, and effortlessly. They put an antique armoire back together for me, and in addition numerous different things, and went the extra mile all around. The movers were cheerful, helpful, and so polite. They made what could have been an unpleasant circumstance stress-free. I don't know how they do what they do, however they do. They deserve each penny and more!

Did You Know

QuestionA boat trailer is a trailer designed to launch, retrieve, carry and sometimes store boats.

Question

Very light trucks.Popular in Europe and Asia, many mini-trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles, usually with monocoque bodies.Specialized designs withsubstantialframes such as the Italian Piaggio shown hereare basedupon Japanese designs (in this case by Daihatsu) and are popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities that often have very narrow alleyways. Regardless of the name, these small trucks serve a wide range of uses.In Japan, theyare regulatedunder the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break on taxes for buying a smaller and less-powerful vehicle (currently, the engineis limitedto 660 ccs {0.66L} displacement). These vehiclesare usedas on-road utility vehicles in Japan.These Japanese-made mini trucks thatwere manufacturedfor on-road use are competing with off-road ATVs in the United States, and import regulationsrequirethat these mini trucks have a 25 mph (40 km/h) speed governor as theyare classifiedas low-speed vehicles.These vehicles have found uses in construction, large campuses (government, university, and industrial), agriculture, cattle ranches, amusement parks, and replacements for golf carts.Major mini truck manufacturers and their brands: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishi Minicab, Subaru Sambar, Suzuki Carry
As with many things in Europe and Asia, the illusion of delicacy and proper manners always seems to attract tourists.Popular in Europe and Asia, mini trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles with monochrome bodies.Such specialized designs with such great frames such as the Italian Piaggio, based upon Japanese designs. In this case itwas basedupon Japanese designs made by Daihatsu.These are very popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities, which often have very narrow alleyways.Despite whatever name theyare called, these very light trucks serve a wide variety of purposes.
Yet, in Japan theyare regulatedunder the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break in taxes for buying a small and less-powerful vehicle. Currently, the engineis limitedto 660 cc [0.66L] displacement. These vehicles beganbeing usedas on-road utility vehicles in Japan.Classified as a low speed vehicle, these Japanese-made mini truckswere manufacturedfor on-road use for competing the the off-road ATVs in the United States. Import regulationsrequirethat the mini trucks have a 25 mph (40km/h) speed governor. Again, this is because they are low speed vehicles.
However, these vehicles have foundnumerousamounts of ways to help the community.They invest money into the government, universities, amusement parks, and replacements for golf cars.They have some major Japanese mini truck manufacturarers as well as brands such as: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishit Minicab, Subaru Sambar, and Suzuki Carry.

QuestionA business route (occasionally city route) in the United States and Canada is a short special route connected to a parent numbered highway at its beginning, then routed through the central business district of a nearby city or town, and finally reconnecting with the same parent numbered highway again at its end.

QuestionA relatable reality t.v. show to the industry is the show Ice Road Truckers, which premiered season 3 on the History Channel in 2009. The show documents the lives of truck drivers working the scary Dalton Highway in Alaska. Following drivers as they compete to see which one of them can haul the most loads before the end of the season.It'll grab you with its mechanical problems that so many have experienced and as you watch them avoid the pitfalls of dangerous and icy roads!

QuestionIn 1893, the Office of Road Inquiry (ORI)was establishedas an organization.However, in 1905 the namewas changedto the Office Public Records (OPR).The organization then went on to become a division of the United States Department of Agriculture. As seen throughout history, organizations seem incapable of maintaining permanent names.So, the organization's namewas changedthree more times, first in 1915 to the Bureau of Public Roads and again in 1939 to the Public Roads Administration (PRA). Yet again, the name was later shifted to the Federal Works Agency, although itwas abolishedin 1949.Finally, in 1949, the name reverted to the Bureau of Public Roads, falling under the Department of Commerce. With so many name changes, it can be difficult to keep up to date with such organizations. This is why it is most important to research and educate yourself on such matters.