Republic Van Lines

USDOT # 1071379
3246 Montgomery HWY Suite 210
Dothan, AL 36303
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (334) 699-6762
Company Site:

Moving with Republic Van Lines

Republic Van Lines is one of the listed moving companies in your region.
Republic Van Lines can send your property in your your new home from your sometime property to your moving company new situation.
customers have told us Republic Van Lines is in the domain and our Republic Van Lines reviews below reflect enlightening remark.

See More Moving companies in Dothan, Alabama

Your Republic Van Lines Reviews

required (not published)

Great job! Professional, the Republic crew were great!

Did You Know

QuestionPrior tothe 20th century, freight was generally transported overland via trains and railroads.During this time, trains were essential, and they werehighlyefficient at moving large amounts of freight.But, they could only deliver that freight to urban centers for distribution by horse-drawn transport.Though there were several trucks throughout this time, theywere usedmore as space for advertising that for actual utility.At this time, the use of range for trucks was quite challenging.The use of electric engines, lack of paved rural roads, and small load capacities limited trucks to most short-haul urban routes.

QuestionThe public idea of the trucking industry in the United States popular culture has gone through many transformations.However, images of the masculine side of trucking are a common theme throughout time.The 1940's first made truckers popular, with their songs and movies about truck drivers. Then in the 1950's theywere depictedas heroes of the road, living a life of freedom on the open road.Trucking culture peaked in the 1970's as theywere glorifiedas modern days cowboys, outlaws, and rebels. Since then the portrayal has come with a more negative connotation as we see in the 1990's.Unfortunately, the depiction of truck drivers went from such a positive depiction to that of troubled serial killers.

QuestionDuring the latter part of the 20th century, we saw a decline of the trucking culture.Coinciding with this decline was a decline of the image of truck drivers, as they becamenegativelystigmatized.As a result of such negativity, it makes sense that truck drivers werefrequentlyportrayed as the "bad guy(s)" in movies.

QuestionTrailer stability can be defined as the tendency of a trailer to dissipate side-to-side motion. The initial motion may be caused by aerodynamic forces, such as from a cross wind or a passing vehicle. One common criterion for stability is the center of mass location with respect to the wheels, which can usually be detected by tongue weight. If the center of mass of the trailer is behind its wheels, therefore having a negative tongue weight, the trailer will likely be unstable. Another parameter which is less commonly a factor is the trailer moment of inertia. Even if the center of mass is forward of the wheels, a trailer with a long load, and thus large moment of inertia, may be unstable.


The year of 1977 marked the release of the infamous Smokey and the Bandit.It went on to be the third highest grossing film that year, following tough competitors like Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind.Burt Reynolds plays the protagonist, or "The Bandit", who escorts "The Snowman"in order todeliver bootleg beer.Reynolds once stated he envisioned trucking as a "hedonistic joyrideentirelydevoid from economic reality"
Another action film in 1977 also focused on truck drivers, as was the trend it seems. Breaker! Breaker! starring infamous Chuck Norris also focused on truck drivers. They were also displaying movie posters with the catch phrase "... he's got a CB radio and a hundred friends whojustmight get mad!"