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Some Things that Must Be Known

  1. Basics Guide to Trade Show Shipping
  2. Keep Track of the Bill of Lading (BOL)
  3. Information on Freight Carrier
  4. Class of Freight
  5. Window of Delivery
  6. Storage for Trade Show Shipments
  7. Hidden Charges To Look For In Trade Show Shipping

1. Basics Guide

Trade Show Shipping may carry a few unexpected issues when it comes to small freight that will not fill an entire truckload. There are a lot of things that must be kept in mind if you wish to avoid large fees when it comes time to ship. It isn't much of a shock that trade show shipping can devastate the organization that you have taken to your logistic and freight business. If the trade show is large, then it will be even more difficult to manage. Trying to keep track of the constant trucks that will be out to cover the shipping needs of the trade show, as well as the mess of people that will be everywhere at the same time. While this may sound intimidating, following these few simple tips will help alleviate a large portion of the stress involved with trade show shipping.

2. Keep Track of the Bill of Lading (BOL)

The bill of lading that was used during pickup is critical to the overall outcome of the shipment. You will need to confirm that there are a few pieces of vital information present on this bill of lading before any shipping begins.

  1. The address of where the trade show will be held
  2. The name of the trade show where the shipment will be headed to. make sure this is especially clear, as sometimes there is more than one trade show being held in a close proximity to one another.
  3. The booth number and name.
  4. Decorator of the show and the number.

This important information should be contained in the packet handed over to the company handling the trade show. It should also be documented on the bill of lading.

3. Information on Freight Carrier

Trade show shipping requires special permits and documentation. Some smaller logistic companies and shipping service companies do not have this paperwork on hand. make sure the freight carrier that is handling the trade show has the paperwork necessary. If this paperwork is not covered, then it may leave you with the hassle of having to find storage for the goods, as well as covering any associated disposition charges.

4. Class of Freight

It is important to note that any item being delivered to a trade show will be of class 125. This might mean a price decrease or increase depending on the size of the item that you are shipping, as well as the usual class that it is categorized under.

5. Window of Delivery

Each and every shipping carrier should have permission to make deliveries to the trade show. These carriers will have a specified date and time window. It is critical that the freight is on the destination premises long before the scheduled window. If a trade show delivery appointment is missed, then the carrier is responsible for contacting the trade show and finding the time for a new appointment. This will delay delivery and may result in delivery after the trade show has ended.

6. Storage for Trade Show Shipments

The hectic nature of trade show shipments spans beyond the scheduled time of delivery. Once the show ends, it is critical that the freight is picked up as soon as possible. If this does not happen, it may be sent to storage. When a trade show concludes, the booths that are remaining are sent to another location. Be sure you are in the know with this kind of information. Knowing when the trade show ends will make it easier to get everything handled in a more timely manner.

7. Hidden Charges To Look For

Make sure items arrive at the trade show safely. Make sure that no corners are being cut for the shipping of this freight. Irresponsible companies will often be faced with hefty charges as a result of negligence during shipping. Make sure everything is in order on your side to avoid these charges.

Maintain proper documentation on all items that are being shipped. this will ensure that all government mandated procedures are being followed. Again, doing this will make it much easier to get the goods where they need to go without violating any rules and ending up with the costly consequences.

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“ The first original song about truck driving appeared in 1939 when Cliff Bruner and His Boys recorded Ted Daffan's "Truck Driver's Blues," a song explicitly marketed to roadside cafe owners who were installing juke boxes in record numbers to serve truckers and other motorists.” - Shane Hamilton

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