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Things to Keep With You on Move Day


Things to Keep With You on Move Day


  1. Being Prepared Prevents Unnecessary Stress
  2. A Packing Kit
  3. Toiletries
  4. Eating Utensils
  5. Pet Supplies
  6. First Aid Kit with Medications
  7. Phone Charges and a Speaker
  8. Bedding
  9. Food and Snacks
  10. Anything Else You Might Need

1. Being Prepared Prevents Unnecessary Stress

Whether you are moving locally or long distance, it is easy for you to forget to take care of yourself during the strenuous moving process. Often times, since everything is being packed away into boxes, it is hard to find basic necessities that you may need throughout the day. You may reach your new home and realize that you need shampoo, but it is buried deep in (one of the many) boxes in the bathroom.

Many people regret not better preparing themselves for the move. At Moving Authority, we too often hear that one of the most difficult things for people to go through on a move is to not have any of their things in an easily accessible location. With this list, we give you the items that people most commonly need when they are moving into a new home. Pre-planning is essential to reducing stress during and after the move. 

2. A Packing Kit:

Sometimes, people have forgotten to pack something and find that they have no more supplies to pack the item. So, it is always smart for you to have a box, tape, scissors, labels and a marker.

3. Toiletries:

Toothpaste, soap, shower gel, shampoo, razors, toothbrush, toilet paper, and paper towels. These are all the necessities you will most likely have to keep with you so you don't have to dig through boxes or bags just to get to them. 

4. Eating Utensils:

Most of the time, take out delivery will not include utensils. Although, if you request them they might bring them, it's always better to be sure that you have something to eat with, so it might be best to bring your own utensils. 

5. Pet Supplies:

Water bowl, bed, food, blankets, treats and anything else that might make the transition better for your animal. Moving is equally as hard on animals because their entire environment is changing as well and they have to adjust 

6. First Aid Kit with Medications:

Motrin, Aspirin, bandages, any prescriptions you and your family may need. This is very important to have on hand, especially if you have children with you. You want to be prepared for anything that may happen so keeping them with you makes them easily accessible. 

7. Phone Chargers and a Speaker:

Unpacking is much more do-able when there is music playing. And of course, you’re going to need to keep charged, so don't forget any chargers you may need for your phone, speakers, or anything else that might need to be charged. 

8. Bedding:

The worst feeling in the world is finally getting to lay down after a long day of moving, only to realize that you don’t have a single thing to sleep on. Make sure you're prepared, maybe even bring a blow-up bed if you have one, whatever you need to make you comfortable. The process of moving can be stressful and exhausting so you will likely want a good rest once you settle in.

9. Food and Snacks:

You can’t order takeout every time someone is hungry. Also, don’t forget bottled water and other drinks. Buying some non-perishable foods might be an option for some snacks to keep on hand with you for you or your children. You might want to put this all in a bag, such as an overnight bag or travel bag, just to be sure that you are prepared for any mishap that may happen. 

10. Anything You Need

You should bring anything that might make spending the first night in your home easier: bathroom supplies, valuable family items, a portable DVD player, or whatever else will make your family feel comfortable in the new home.

Despite being in a world where you can have pretty much everything you need with the tap of a phone screen or dash to the store. However, there are some things that will cause a great inconvenience when they are not in your immediate presence.

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