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Do I Need Self-Storage Insurance%3F

Need Self-Storage Insurance?


Self storage insurance

  1. Typically No.
  2. Is it All a Scam?
  3. Reasoning Behind It All...
  4. Always Best to Double Check 
  5. Self-Storage Insurance Explained

1. Typically No.

In short, it is not required for you to have self-storage insurance. Keep in mind, however, that self-storages do not operate the same way that moving companies do, meaning there is no insurance coverage included in the monthly rate for your storage. When you are booking a self-storage, the storage manager will probably not tell you that a lot of your items may already be covered under another insurance policy that you have. If you have homeowners or renters insurance, then these policies will still be effective for your goods, even if they are not in your home.

2. Is It All a Scam?

If your goods are covered under an insurance policy, then why should you still consider having storage insurance? To answer briefly, there is no reason to have storage insurance if you already have an existing homeowners insurance or renters insurance policy.  The storage facility wants to make a profit off of your business. Basically, storage facilities are playing on your fears to get you to give them more money.

3. Reasoning Behind It All...

Before you scream at your local self-storage manager, keep in mind that a lot of them are likely not aware that they are manipulating you. They are urged to recommend self-storage insurance to all new customers by their corporate managers. The manager of the facility is only there to, you guessed it, manage the facility. Some professionals aren’t associated with the insurance companies. Unfortunately, some cases of manipulation can be very extreme.

Some storage facilities require you to have your items insured before moving them into the unit. If the storage facility requires insurance, they are probably protecting themselves from being involved in any lawsuits for damage of your items. If this happens to be the case for you, then you should acquire proof of insurance from your homeowner's insurance company. Sometimes, storage units do not tell the renter that they need insurance until the time they are moving in, then they want insurance immediately. In these cases, the company will force you to purchase a policy from them. So, it is always better to have proof of insurance.

4. Always Best to Double Check 

If you are still unsure of your need to purchase self-storage insurance, contact Moving Authority. We can help you work through the questions you may have, as well as find you an excellent mover to get your goods to a self-storage. This is just another way Moving Authority helps you move.

5. Self-Storage Insurance Explained

If you are moving into a new home, then there is a relatively large chance that you will rent a self-service storage unit. Whether it be because of your new home is not ready to move all of your items in yet, or you aren’t ready to move everything yet, renting a storage unit is a good way to keep your goods safe.

A lot of people do not know that storage insurance exists. When you arrive at the local storage facility, you will most likely be asked if you have storage insurance. You may have homeowners insurance or renters insurance, but storage insurance is something that is much less popular. The concept of storage insurance is not very complicated. Since most of your household items are sitting in a storage facility, they are vulnerable to lose as a result of multiple different circumstances.

If there were a flood in the storage unit, for example, your goods would be damaged. However, there are a lot of storage units that claim no responsibility for your goods when they are inside of your facility. When the storage manager explains this to you, there is a very high chance that you will not even consider what is being said, likely because you don’t think you need storage insurance.

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In the United States, shipments larger than about 7,000 kg (15,432 lb) are classified as truckload freight (TL). It is more efficient and affordable for a large shipment to have exclusive use of one larger trailer. This is opposed to having to share space on a smaller Less than Truckload freight carrier.

The public idea of the trucking industry in the United States popular culture has gone through many transformations. However, images of the masculine side of trucking are a common theme throughout time. The 1940's first made truckers popular, with their songs and movies about truck drivers. Then in the 1950's they were depicted as heroes of the road, living a life of freedom on the open road. Trucking culture peaked in the 1970's as they were glorified as modern days cowboys, outlaws, and rebels. Since then the portrayal has come with a more negative connotation as we see in the 1990's. Unfortunately, the depiction of truck drivers went from such a positive depiction to that of troubled serial killers.

Another film released in 1975, White Line Fever, also involved truck drivers. It tells the story of a Vietnam War veteran who returns home to take over his father's trucking business. But, he soon finds that corrupt shippers are trying to force him to carry illegal contraband. While endorsing another negative connotation towards the trucking industry, it does portray truck drivers with a certain wanderlust.

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Invented in 1890, the diesel engine was not an invention that became well known in popular culture. It was not until the 1930's for the United States to express further interest for diesel engines to be accepted. Gasoline engines were still in use on heavy trucks in the 1970's, while in Europe they had been entirely replaced two decades earlier.

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Popular among campers is the use of lightweight trailers, such as aerodynamic trailers. These can be towed by a small car, such as the BMW Air Camper. They are built with the intent to lower the tow of the vehicle, thus minimizing drag.

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A relatable reality t.v. show to the industry is the show Ice Road Truckers, which premiered season 3 on the History Channel in 2009. The show documents the lives of truck drivers working the scary Dalton Highway in Alaska. Following drivers as they compete to see which one of them can haul the most loads before the end of the season. It'll grab you with its mechanical problems that so many have experienced and as you watch them avoid the pitfalls of dangerous and icy roads!

In the United States, the Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986 established minimum requirements that must be met when a state issues a commercial driver's license CDL. It specifies the following types of license: - Class A CDL drivers. Drive vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater, or any combination of vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater when towing a trailer weighing more than 10,000 pounds. Transports quantities of hazardous materials that require warning placards under Department of Public Safety regulations. - Class A Driver License permits. Is a step in preparation for Class A drivers to become a Commercial Driver. - Class B CDL driver. Class B is designed to transport 16 or more passengers (including driver) or more than 8 passengers (including the driver) for compensation. This includes, but is not limited to, tow trucks, tractor trailers, and buses.

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