Wile Transfer & Storage

USDOT None
3400 Spartanburg Hwy
Flat Rock, NC 28731
Flat Rock
North Carolina
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: 828-693-7086
Company Site: www.wiletransfer.com

Moving with Wile Transfer & Storage

Residential Moving Company
  • Over 90 years in business
  • Licensed and bonded
  • Covering local moves to/from Hendersonville, Flat Rock, Asheville, Brevard, Fletcher, & Tryon, NC
  • Managing regional and national moves to assist with all your moving needs
  • Member of The Chamber, Better Business Bureau, & North Carolina Movers Association
  • Agent for Allied: Household Moving



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Your Wile Transfer & Storage Reviews

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These folks shook! They were on time, didn't break anything, made an astounding showing of fitting everything into our minor storage room and made an additional stop for us. The entire move took 5 hrs including a 1/2 hr drive from Charlotte to Greensboro. We would utilize them again instant! Much obliged to you, Ovi!!

Did You Know

Question

The trucking industry has made a large historical impact since the early 20th century. It has affected the U.S. bothpoliticallyas well aseconomicallysince the notion has begun.Previous to the invention of automobiles, most freightwas moved bytrain or horse-drawn carriage. Trucks were firstexclusivelyused by the military during World War I.
After the war, construction of paved roads increased. As a result, trucking began to achieve significant popularity by the 1930's.Soon after trucking became subject to various government regulation, such as the hours of service.During the later 1950's and 1960's, trucking accelerated due to the construction of the Interstate Highway System.The Interstate Highway System is an extensive network of freeways linking major cities cross country.

QuestionAnother film released in 1975, White Line Fever, also involved truck drivers. It tells the story of a Vietnam War veteran who returns home to take over his father's trucking business. But, he soon finds that corrupt shippers are trying to force him to carry illegal contraband.While endorsing another negative connotation towards the trucking industry, it does portray truck drivers with a certain wanderlust.

Question

Very light trucks.Popular in Europe and Asia, many mini-trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles, usually with monocoque bodies.Specialized designs withsubstantialframes such as the Italian Piaggio shown hereare basedupon Japanese designs (in this case by Daihatsu) and are popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities that often have very narrow alleyways. Regardless of the name, these small trucks serve a wide range of uses.In Japan, theyare regulatedunder the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break on taxes for buying a smaller and less-powerful vehicle (currently, the engineis limitedto 660 ccs {0.66L} displacement). These vehiclesare usedas on-road utility vehicles in Japan.These Japanese-made mini trucks thatwere manufacturedfor on-road use are competing with off-road ATVs in the United States, and import regulationsrequirethat these mini trucks have a 25 mph (40 km/h) speed governor as theyare classifiedas low-speed vehicles.These vehicles have found uses in construction, large campuses (government, university, and industrial), agriculture, cattle ranches, amusement parks, and replacements for golf carts.Major mini truck manufacturers and their brands: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishi Minicab, Subaru Sambar, Suzuki Carry
As with many things in Europe and Asia, the illusion of delicacy and proper manners always seems to attract tourists.Popular in Europe and Asia, mini trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles with monochrome bodies.Such specialized designs with such great frames such as the Italian Piaggio, based upon Japanese designs. In this case itwas basedupon Japanese designs made by Daihatsu.These are very popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities, which often have very narrow alleyways.Despite whatever name theyare called, these very light trucks serve a wide variety of purposes.
Yet, in Japan theyare regulatedunder the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break in taxes for buying a small and less-powerful vehicle. Currently, the engineis limitedto 660 cc [0.66L] displacement. These vehicles beganbeing usedas on-road utility vehicles in Japan.Classified as a low speed vehicle, these Japanese-made mini truckswere manufacturedfor on-road use for competing the the off-road ATVs in the United States. Import regulationsrequirethat the mini trucks have a 25 mph (40km/h) speed governor. Again, this is because they are low speed vehicles.
However, these vehicles have foundnumerousamounts of ways to help the community.They invest money into the government, universities, amusement parks, and replacements for golf cars.They have some major Japanese mini truck manufacturarers as well as brands such as: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishit Minicab, Subaru Sambar, and Suzuki Carry.

Question

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry.There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine.Improvement in transmissions is yet another source,justlike the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.
The first state weight limits for truckswere determinedand put in place in 1913.Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads.As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and amaximumspeed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks tomostlyurban areas.

QuestionCommercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you.Justto name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes.They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways.They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.