Freddy Duncan & Sons Moving and Storage

809 E 20th St
Cookeville, TN 38501
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (931) 526-9500
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Moving with Freddy Duncan & Sons Moving and Storage

Proudly serving Putnam and Cumberland County for over 30 years, Duncan Moving & Storage is a full-service, family-owned and operated moving company on a mission to set the standard for service in the moving industry.
Freddy Duncan & Sons Moving & Storage was founded on a commitment to make moving a stress-free operation by completing every move on time, sticking to the price quoted, and meeting any special requests. 30 years later and with business better than ever, we are proud to credit this strategy with our success, and we thank our clients for acknowledging our hard work with their repeat business and referrals!

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Your Freddy Duncan & Sons Moving and Storage Reviews

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Wonderful people. Family owned and operated. You couldn't ask for better group of friends and business partners.

Freddy Duncan & Sons Moving and Storage has moved us no less than 5 times, including putting away 50% of our things for a year. They are the best moving organization I've utilized - exceedingly suggested! Super expert, skillful, decent, and individual!

Did You Know

QuestionThe FMCSA is a well-known division of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). It is generally responsible for the enforcement of FMCSA regulations. The driver of a CMV must keep a record of working hours via a log book.This record must reflect the total number of hours spent driving and resting, as well as the time at which the change of duty status occurred.In place of a log book, a motor carrier may choose to keep track of their hours using an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR). Thisautomaticallyrecords the amount of time spent driving the vehicle.


Full truckload carriersnormallydeliver a semi-trailer to a shipper who will fill the trailer with freight for one destination.Once the traileris filled, the driver returns to the shipper to collect the required paperwork.Upon receiving the paperwork the driver will then leave with the trailer containing freight. Next, the driver will proceed to the consignee and deliver the freight him or herself. At times, a driver will transfer the trailer to another driver who will drive the freight the rest of the way.Full Truckload service (FTL) transit times are generally restricted by the driver's availability. This is according to Hours of Service regulations and distance.It istypicallyaccepted that Full Truckload carriers will transport freight at an average rate of 47 miles per hour. This includes traffic jams, queues at intersections, other factors that influence transit time.

QuestionThe word cargo is in reference to particular goods that are generally used for commercial gain. Cargo transportation is generally meant to mean by ship, boat, or plane.However, the term now applies to all types of freight, now including goods carried by train, van, or truck.This term is now used in the case of goods in the cold-chain, as perishable inventory is always cargo in transport towards its final home.Even when itis heldin climate-controlled facilities, it is important to remember perishable goods or inventory have a short life.

QuestionThe Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a division of the USDOT specializing in highway transportation. The agency's major influential activities are generally separated into two different "programs". The first is the Federal-aid Highway Program.This provides financial aid to support the construction, maintenance, and operation of the U.S. highway network.The second program, the Federal Lands Highway Program, shares a similar name with different intentions.The purpose of this program is to improve transportation involving Federal and Tribal lands.They also focus on preserving "national treasures" for the historic and beatific enjoyment for all.

QuestionIn 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.