Magic Valley Movers Id

USDOT # 835716
568 Grange Lane
Twin Falls, ID 83301
Twin Falls
Idaho
Contact Phone: 208-734-6017
Additional Phone: (208) 734-6017
Company Site: Magicvalleymall.com

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The intention of a trailer coupler is to secure the trailer to the towing vehicle. It is an important piece, as the trailer couple attaches to the trailer ball. This then forms a ball and socket connection.It allows for relative movement between the towing vehicle and trailer while towing over uneven road surfaces. The trailer ball shouldbe mountedto the rear bumper or to a drawbar, which may be removable. The drawbar secures to the trailer hitch by inserting it into the hitch receiver and pinning it.
The three most common types of couplers used are straight couplers, A-frame couplers, and adjustable couplers.Another option is bumper-pull hitches in which case draw bars can exert a large amount of leverage on the tow vehicle.This makes it harder to recover from a swerving situation (thus it may not be the safest choice depending on your trip).

QuestionThe public idea of the trucking industry in the United States popular culture has gone through many transformations.However, images of the masculine side of trucking are a common theme throughout time.The 1940's first made truckers popular, with their songs and movies about truck drivers. Then in the 1950's theywere depictedas heroes of the road, living a life of freedom on the open road.Trucking culture peaked in the 1970's as theywere glorifiedas modern days cowboys, outlaws, and rebels. Since then the portrayal has come with a more negative connotation as we see in the 1990's.Unfortunately, the depiction of truck drivers went from such a positive depiction to that of troubled serial killers.

QuestionThe main purpose of the HOS regulation is to prevent accidents due to driver fatigue. To do this, the number of driving hours per day, as well as the number of driving hours per week, havebeen limited.Another measure to prevent fatigue is to keep drivers on a 21 to 24-hour schedulein order tomaintain a natural sleep/wake cycle. Drivers must take a dailyminimumperiod of rest andare allowedlonger "weekend" rest periods. This is in hopes to combat cumulative fatigue effects thataccrueon a weekly basis.

Question

A circumferential route refers to a public transportation system that follows the route in the shape of a circle.Over time a nickname developed in the European Union, calling transportation networks such as these a "ring road".This is no surprise as Europe has several famous "ring roads" such as the Berliner Ring, the Brussels Ring, the Amsterdam Ring, the Boulevard Périphérique around Paris and the Leeds Inner and Outer ring roads. Other countries adopted the term as well which in turn made the name go international.Australia's Melbourne's Western Ring Road and India's Hyderabad's Outer Ring Road both adopted the name.Howeverin Canada, the term is mostcommonlyused, with "orbital" used to a much lesser extent.
On the contrary, the United States calls many "ring roads" as belt-lines, beltways, or loops instead.For example, the Capital Beltway around Washington, D.C. Some ring roads use terminology such as "Inner Loop" and "Outer Loop".This is, of course, for the sake of directional sense, since compass directions cannotbe determinedaround the entire loop.

QuestionIn 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.