The Moving Man

USDOT # 807379
550 W 54th Ave
Anchorage, AK 99518
Anchorage
Alaska
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (907) 348-8889
Company Site: www.themovingman.net

Moving with The Moving Man

Small family owned Anchorage moving company.


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Your The Moving Man Reviews


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I am moving from Anchorage to New Jersey and chose the Moving Man. I can't think of enough good things to say. I was pretty stressed out but the guys were great, fast and tried to pack as much of my stuff as they could. It made the whole process easy and the entire process was very professional and eased my mind a lot . The quote was no problem and came in right around the ballpark of what was estimated. I highly recommend this company.

Avoid this company if you need to move. I have been trying for over a month to get a quote from them and nobody gets back to you. They came out and assessed my things and each time I called hoping to get a quote and confirming a move date I get nowhere. In the long run needed to talk to another person because of a plain lack of response.


DON'T CHOOSE THIS COMPANY!!! My family absurdly utilized this organization to move from Anchorage to Olympia, WA in 2014. More than one thousand dollars of our products were stolen from the shipment (which was more than two weeks late) and invaluable family photographs and tokens. The hundred dollars the proprietor charged us to wrap our things was never done either and a few bits of our furniture broke as a consequence of poor taking care of and stacking. In the wake of checking on them on facebook, the proprietor, Martin, continued to irritate us in a profane way through private messages. He didn't assume any liability for this occasion and would not permit us to record a case for their organization protection. We got no remuneration for this loss of property.

Did You Know

Question Receiving nation attention during the 1960's and 70's, songs and movies about truck driving were major hits. Finding solidarity, truck drivers participated in widespread strikes. Truck drivers from all over opposed the rising cost of fuel. Not to mention this is during the energy crises of 1873 and 1979. In 1980 the Motor Carrier Act drastically deregulated the trucking industry. Since then trucking has come to dominate the freight industry in the latter part of the 20th century. This coincided with what are now known as 'big-box' stores such as Target or Wal-Mart.

Question Beginning the the early 20th century, the 1920's saw several major advancements. There was improvement in rural roads which was significant for the time. The diesel engine, which are 25-40% more efficient than gas engines were also a major breakthrough. We also saw the standardization of truck and trailer sizes along with fifth wheel coupling systems. Additionally power assisted brakes and steering developed. By 1933, all states had some form of varying truck weight regulation.

Question Another film released in 1975, White Line Fever, also involved truck drivers. It tells the story of a Vietnam War veteran who returns home to take over his father's trucking business. But, he soon finds that corrupt shippers are trying to force him to carry illegal contraband. While endorsing another negative connotation towards the trucking industry, it does portray truck drivers with a certain wanderlust.

Question The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) issues Hours of Service regulations. At the same time, they govern the working hours of anyone operating a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in the United States. Such regulations apply to truck drivers, commercial and city bus drivers, and school bus drivers who operate CMVs. With these rules in place, the number of daily and weekly hours spent driving and working is limited. The FMCSA regulates the minimum amount of time drivers must spend resting between driving shifts. In regards to intrastate commerce, the respective state's regulations apply.

Question The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) conducted a series of tests. These tests were extensive field tests of roads and bridges to assess damages to the pavement. In particular they wanted to know how traffic contributes to the deterioration of pavement materials. These tests essentially led to the 1964 recommendation by AASHTO to Congress. The recommendation determined the gross weight limit for trucks to be determined by a bridge formula table. This includes table based on axle lengths, instead of a state upper limit. By the time 1970 came around, there were over 18 million truck on America's roads.