The Moving Man

USDOT # 807379
550 W 54th Ave
Anchorage, AK 99518
Anchorage
Alaska
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (907) 348-8889
Company Site: www.themovingman.net

Moving with The Moving Man

Small family owned Anchorage moving company.


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Your The Moving Man Reviews


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I am moving from Anchorage to New Jersey and chose the Moving Man. I can't think of enough good things to say. I was pretty stressed out but the guys were great, fast and tried to pack as much of my stuff as they could. It made the whole process easy and the entire process was very professional and eased my mind a lot . The quote was no problem and came in right around the ballpark of what was estimated. I highly recommend this company.

Avoid this company if you need to move. I have been trying for over a month to get a quote from them and nobody gets back to you. They came out and assessed my things and each time I called hoping to get a quote and confirming a move date I get nowhere. In the long run needed to talk to another person because of a plain lack of response.


DON'T CHOOSE THIS COMPANY!!! My family absurdly utilized this organization to move from Anchorage to Olympia, WA in 2014. More than one thousand dollars of our products were stolen from the shipment (which was more than two weeks late) and invaluable family photographs and tokens. The hundred dollars the proprietor charged us to wrap our things was never done either and a few bits of our furniture broke as a consequence of poor taking care of and stacking. In the wake of checking on them on facebook, the proprietor, Martin, continued to irritate us in a profane way through private messages. He didn't assume any liability for this occasion and would not permit us to record a case for their organization protection. We got no remuneration for this loss of property.

Did You Know

Question Alongside the many different trailers provided are motorcycle trailers. They are designed to haul motorcycles behind an automobile or truck. Depending on size and capability, some trailer may be able to carry several motorcycles or perhaps just one. They specifically designed this trailer to meet the needs of motorcyclists. They carry motorcycles, have ramps, and include tie-downs. There may be a utility trailer adapted permanently or occasionally to haul one or more motorcycles.

Question Trucks and cars have much in common mechanically as well as ancestrally. One link between them is the steam-powered fardier Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot, who built it in 1769. Unfortunately for him, steam trucks were not really common until the mid 1800's. While looking at this practically, it would be much harder to have a steam truck. This is mostly due to the fact that the roads of the time were built for horse and carriages. Steam trucks were left to very short hauls, usually from a factory to the nearest railway station. In 1881, the first semi-trailer appeared, and it was in fact towed by a steam tractor manufactured by De Dion-Bouton. Steam-powered trucks were sold in France and in the United States, apparently until the eve of World War I. Also, at the beginning of World War II in the United Kingdom, they were known as 'steam wagons'.

Question The moving industry in the United States was deregulated with the Household Goods Transportation Act of 1980. This act allowed interstate movers to issue binding or fixed estimates for the first time. Doing so opened the door to hundreds of new moving companies to enter the industry. This led to an increase in competition and soon movers were no longer competing on services but on price. As competition drove prices lower and decreased what were already slim profit margins, "rogue" movers began hijacking personal property as part of a new scam. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) enforces Federal consumer protection regulations related to the interstate shipment of household goods (i.e., household moves that cross State lines). FMCSA has held this responsibility since 1999, and the Department of Transportation has held this responsibility since 1995 (the Interstate Commerce Commission held this authority prior to its termination in 1995).

Question Signage of business routes varies, depending on the type of route they are derived from. Business routes paralleling U.S. and state highways usually have exactly the same shield shapes and nearly the same overall appearance as the routes they parallel, with a rectangular plate reading "BUSINESS" placed above the shield (either supplementing or replacing the directional plate, depending on the preference of the road agency). In order to better identify and differentiate alternate routes from the routes they parallel, some states such as Maryland are beginning to use green shields for business routes off U.S. highways. In addition, Maryland uses a green shield for business routes off state highways with the word "BUSINESS" in place of "MARYLAND" is used for a state route.

Question

The concept of a bypass is a simple one. It is a road or highway that purposely avoids or "bypasses" a built-up area, town, or village. Bypasses were created with the intent to let through traffic flow without having to get stuck in local traffic. In general they are supposed to reduce congestion in a built-up area. By doing so, road safety will greatly improve.
 
A bypass designated for trucks traveling a long distance, either commercial or otherwise, is called a truck route.