Geipe Moving & Storage

USDOT # 1739606
1117 Wilso Drive
Baltimore, MD 21223
Baltimore
Maryland
Contact Phone: 1-888-566-9737
Additional Phone: (410) 646-0600
Company Site: www.geipemovers.com

Moving with Geipe Moving & Storage

Geipe Moving & Storage will append serving to our clientel as we endeavor to converge our clients needs.
Geipe Moving & Storage can be ready your relocation well-situated with movers who may cost with you every measure of the elbow room.
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They touched base on time and prepared to work. The folks were extremely entertaining and made them giggle the whole move. I was painstakingly guided through the whole procedure of my turn from starting to the end.

Did You Know

QuestionWith the partial deregulation of the trucking industry in 1980 by the Motor Carrier Act, trucking companies increased. The workforce wasdrasticallyde-unionized. As a result, drivers received a lower payoverall.Losing its spotlight in the popular culture, trucking had become less intimate as some unspoken competition broke out.However, the deregulation only increased the competition and productivity with the trucking industry as a whole. This was beneficial to the America consumer by reducing costs.In 1982 the Surface TransportationAssistanceAct established a federalminimumtruck weight limits. Thus, trucks were finally standardized truck size and weight limits across the country.This was also put in to place so that across country traffic on the Interstate Highways resolved the issue of the 'barrier states'.

QuestionWithin the world of transportation, bypass routes are often very controversial.This ismostlydue to the fact that theyrequirethe building of a road carrying heavy traffic where no road existed before.This has created conflict among society thus creating a divergence between those in support of bypasses and those whoare opposed. Supporters believe they reduce congestion in built up areas. Those in opposition do not believe in developing (often rural) undeveloped land.In addition, the cities thatare bypassedmay also oppose such a project as reduced traffic may, in turn, reduce and damage business.

QuestionAs of January 1, 2000, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA)was establishedas its own separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation. This came about under the "Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999".The FMCSAis basedin Washington, D.C., employing more than 1,000 people throughout all 50 States, including in the District of Columbia.Their staff dedicates themselves to the improvement of safety among commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and to saving lives.

QuestionThroughout the United States, bypass routes are a special type of route mostcommonlyused on an alternative routing of a highway around a town.Specificallywhen the main route of the highway goes through the town.Originally, these routeswere designatedas "truck routes" as a means to divert trucking traffic away from towns.However, this name was later changed by AASHTO in 1959 to what we now call a "bypass".Many "truck routes" continue to remain regardless that the mainline of the highway prohibits trucks.

Question1941 was a tough era to live through.Yet, President Roosevelt appointed a special committee to explore the idea of a "national inter-regional highway" system. Unfortunately, the committee's progress came to a halt with the rise of the World War II.After the war was over, the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1944 authorized the designation of what are not termed 'Interstate Highways'.However, he did not include any funding program to build such highways.With limited resources came limited progress until President Dwight D. Eisenhower came along in 1954. He renewed interest in the 1954 plan. Although, this began and long and bitter debate between various interests.Generally, the opposing sides were considering where such funding would come from such as rail, truck, tire, oil, and farm groups. All who would overpay for the new highways and how.