United Professional Moving

USDOT # 2373489
10144 Arbor Run Drive 55
Tampa, FL 33647
Tampa
Florida
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (805) 806-5266
Company Site: www.unitedprofessionalmoving.com

Moving with United Professional Moving

By providing peculiar service to United Professional Moving supplies certain serving to our customer as we attempt to fulfil all of our clients wants . To our customers, we need to stay the needs of our client roots.
Our moving and storage company can enthral asset in your region from your former space to your newly hall. Clients have also disclosed to us that United Professional Moving is the respectable in the area.
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Did You Know

QuestionPrior tothe 20th century, freight was generally transported overland via trains and railroads.During this time, trains were essential, and they werehighlyefficient at moving large amounts of freight.But, they could only deliver that freight to urban centers for distribution by horse-drawn transport.Though there were several trucks throughout this time, theywere usedmore as space for advertising that for actual utility.At this time, the use of range for trucks was quite challenging.The use of electric engines, lack of paved rural roads, and small load capacities limited trucks to most short-haul urban routes.

QuestionThe Federal Bridge Law handles relations between the gross weight of the truck, the number of axles, and the spacing between them. This is how they determine is the truck can be on the Interstate Highway system. Each state gets to decide themaximum, under the Federal Bridge Law. They determine by vehicle in combination with axle weight on state and local roads

QuestionThere are many different types of trailers thatare designedto haul livestock, such as cattle or horses.Mostcommonlyused are the stock trailer, whichis enclosedon the bottom but has openings at approximately. This opening is at the eye level of the animalsin order toallow ventilation. A horse trailer is a much more elaborate form of stock trailer. Generally horsesare hauledwith the purpose of attending or participating in competition.Due to this, they must be in peak physical condition, so horse trailersare designedfor the comfort and safety of the animals. They'retypicallywell-ventilated with windows and vents along withspecificallydesigned suspension. Additionally, horse trailers have internal partitions that assist animals staying upright during travel. It's also to protect other horses from injuring each other in transit.There are also larger horse trailers that may incorporate more specialized areas for horse tack. They may even include elaborate quarters with sleeping areas, bathroom, cooking facilities etc.

QuestionThe 1980s were full of happening things, but in 1982 a Southern California truck driver gained short-lived fame. His name was Larry Walters, also known as "Lawn Chair Larry", for pulling a crazy stunt. He ascended to a height of 16,000 feet (4,900 m) by attaching helium balloons to a lawn chair, hence the name.Walters claims he only intended to remain floating near the ground andwas shockedwhen his chair shot up at a rate of 1,000 feet (300 m) per minute.The inspiration for such a stunt Walters claims his poor eyesight for ruining his dreams to become an Air Force pilot.

Question

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry.There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine.Improvement in transmissions is yet another source,justlike the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.
The first state weight limits for truckswere determinedand put in place in 1913.Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads.As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and amaximumspeed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks tomostlyurban areas.