Denver Moving Services

USDOT # 2076875
840 Hartford Drive
Boulder, CO 80305
Boulder
Colorado
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (303) 807-9388
Company Site:

Moving with Denver Moving Services

Denver Moving Services contributes indisputable service to our client as we attempt to satisfy our customers needs.
Each client has different requisite for their , which is why Denver Moving Services provides servicing and moving companies to get along our in effect to admit them.
Customers have told us Denver Moving Services is in the area and our Denver Moving Services reviews below reflect enlightening remark.




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I have used Denver Moving Services many times. They do, what they say they will, very professional, great customer service and they do everything without worries. I will use them again without hesitation.

Did You Know

QuestionThe moving industry in the United States was deregulated with the Household Goods Transportation Act of 1980. This act allowed interstate movers to issue binding or fixed estimates for the first time. Doing so opened the door to hundreds of new moving companies to enter the industry. This led to an increase in competition and soon movers were no longer competing on services but on price. As competition drove prices lower and decreased what were already slim profit margins, "rogue" movers began hijacking personal property as part of a new scam. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) enforces Federal consumer protection regulations related to the interstate shipment of household goods (i.e., household moves that cross State lines). FMCSA has held this responsibility since 1999, and the Department of Transportation has held this responsibility since 1995 (the Interstate Commerce Commission held this authority prior to its termination in 1995).

QuestionThroughout the United States, bypass routes are a special type of route mostcommonlyused on an alternative routing of a highway around a town.Specificallywhen the main route of the highway goes through the town.Originally, these routeswere designatedas "truck routes" as a means to divert trucking traffic away from towns.However, this name was later changed by AASHTO in 1959 to what we now call a "bypass".Many "truck routes" continue to remain regardless that the mainline of the highway prohibits trucks.

QuestionThe decade of the 70's in the United States was a memorable one, especially for the notion of truck driving. This seemed todramaticallyincrease popularity among trucker culture.Throughout this era, and even in today's society, truck driversare romanticizedas modern-day cowboys and outlaws.These stereotypes were due to their use of Citizens Band (CB) radios to swap information with other drivers. Informationregardingthe locations of police officers and transportation authorities. The general public took an interest in the truckers 'way of life' as well. Both drivers and the public took interest in plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and CB slang.

QuestionWords have always had a different meaning or havebeen usedinterchangeablywith others across all cultures.In the United States, Canada, and the Philippines the word "truck" ismostlyreserved for larger vehicles.Although in Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa, the word "truck" is generally reserved for large vehicles. In Australia and New Zealand, a pickup truck is usually called a ute, short for "utility". While over in South Africa it is called a bakkie (Afrikaans: "small open container").The United Kingdom, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Ireland, and Hong Kong use the "lorry" instead of truck, but only for medium and heavy types.

QuestionThe term "lorry" has an ambiguous origin, but it is likely that its roots were in the rail transport industry.This is where the wordis knownto havebeen usedin 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage)specificallya large flat wagon. It may derive from the verb lurry, which means to pull or tug, of uncertain origin.It's expanded meaning was much more exciting as "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods", and has been in usage since 1911.Previously, unbeknownst to most, the word "lorry"was usedfor a fashion of big horse-drawn goods wagon.