MOVING PROFESSIONALS

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How To Become A Professional Mover


We frequently provide tips on packing to help our readers. We love to help and to better serve you, we’d like to add to that library with some moving tips and tricks from a professional organizer. Here’s what three tips the pros have to say about packing up your house:

1. Make a "Maybe" Pile

Qualified movers recommend that you set aside a box or suitcase in which to put things that you can’t decide on. So, if you’re not sure about that vase the in-laws gave you, put it in the box and move on to things you have a definite plan for. That way, you won’t get caught up or slowed down by natural indecision.

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2. Don't Be Afraid to Hire a Professional 

Don’t Be Afraid to Hire a Professional
Although it might seem like a tactic to get you to spend more money, moving professionals who can help you pack can be a great investment for someone who doesn’t have the time or suffers from a tendency to be chronically disorganized. Even if neither of these is the case, maybe you have lots of breakable, difficult-to-pack stuff like chandeliers or appliances, or perhaps things in need of delicate care, like art or antiques. Moving professionals can help you pack these things correctly so they make it to your new home in one piece (and in the same condition in which they left your old home). There’s no need to be embarrassed. If packing up is something you honestly don’t think you can do well, reach out to a professional who can help you work with professional moving service.

3. Invest in the Appropriate Boxes 

Try to find some that are specifically designed for packing your household items. There’s nothing wrong with getting free boxes from the liquor store or a recycling center, but moving professionals recommend that at the very least, you place your valuable, breakable, and heavy items (like books) in a professionally-made packing box, so that they can be packed and moved properly to prevent damage to the contents or injury to anyone picking them up. You should also look at special filing boxes for your paperwork, which is not only extremely valuable but will also be surprisingly heavy when it’s all in the same box. Also, check to see if you can get these boxes for free before paying for them so save money on your move.

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4. Prepare a Workstation for Yourself

Moving professionals recommend that you set aside space in your home, like a kitchen or dining room table, in which you can work safely and comfortably. Not only will using a table save your back, but it will help you organize the packing up of your home, which can quickly turn a formerly neat house into a mess. And creating the work area is simple: just lay out some newspaper to prevent the table’s surface from being scratched, stand up the boxes within easy reach, and put tape, bubble wrap, markers, and anything else you need on the table. Then, bring over the things you want to pack, and fill up one box at a time. Even if you’ve moved before and have done so without the workstation, try it the next time you move. You’d be surprised how an organization can help reduce your stress. Packing might even become more enjoyable.

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