BEST MOVING COMPANIES IN SOMERVILLE.MA

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4 TOOLS EVERY MOVING COMPANY SHOULD HAVE

Moving Locally Without Stressing: It Can Be Done!

  • Once you have a moving date, it’s best to begin planning your move.
  • Even if you don’t have an exact date, you can pre-organize and dispose of things you know you won’t want to take with you.
  • Be sure to transfer all accounts and subscription services to the new address before the move, as this is an easy step to forget.
  • Mail forwarding can be scheduled in advance via the USPS, either in person at a post office or online for a small fee.
  • Check out the most renowned movers in your area and read the reviews in order to have the most accurate depiction of the moving services you’re getting.
Did You Know

QuestionIn 1895 Karl Benz designed and built the first truck in history by using the internal combustion engine. Later that year some of Benz's trucks gave into modernization and went on to become the first bus by the Netphener. This would be the first motor bus company in history.Hardly a year later, in 1986, another internal combustion engine truckwas built bya man named Gottlieb Daimler.As people began to catch on, other companies, such as Peugeot, Renault, and Bussing, also built their own versions.In 1899, the first truck in the United Stateswas built byAutocar and was available with two optional horsepower motors, 5 or 8.

QuestionBeginning the the early 20th century, the 1920's saw several major advancements. There was improvement in rural roads which was significant for the time.The diesel engine, which are 25-40% more efficient than gas engines were also a major breakthrough.We also saw the standardization of truck and trailer sizes along with fifth wheel coupling systems. Additionally power assisted brakes and steering developed. By 1933, all states had some form of varying truck weight regulation.

QuestionThe decade of the 70s saw the heyday of truck driving, and the dramatic rise in the popularity of "trucker culture". Truck drivers were romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws (and this stereotype persists even today). This was due in part to their use of citizens' band (CB) radio to relay information to each other regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. Plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and using CB slang were popular not just with drivers but among the general public.

QuestionPublic transportation is vital to a large part of society and is in dire need of work and attention.In 2010, the DOT awarded $742.5 million in funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to 11 transit projects. The awardeesspecificallyfocused light rail projects. One includes both a commuter rail extension and a subway project in New York City. The public transportation New York City has to offer is in need of some TLC. Another is working on a rapid bus transit system in Springfield, Oregon. The funds also subsidize a heavy rail project in northern Virginia.This finally completes the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority's Metro Silver Line, connecting to Washington, D.C., and the Washington Dulles International Airport.This is important because the DOT haspreviouslyagreed to subsidize the Silver Line construction to Reston, Virginia.

QuestionBusiness routes generally follow the original routing of the numbered route through a city or town.Beginning in the 1930s and lasting thru the 1970s was an era marking a peak in large-scale highway construction in the United States. U.S. Highways and Interstates weretypicallybuilt in particular phases.Their first phase of development began with the numbered route carrying traffic through the center of a city or town.The second phase involved the construction of bypasses around the central business districts of the towns they began.As bypass construction continued, original parts of routes that had once passed straight thru a city would often become a "business route".

QuestionIn 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.