Trucking Authority Packages

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Product Code: 52

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Product Description:

  • Trucking Authority Packages Costs to Operate trucking firm
  • You don't need a truck to get motor carrier authority.
  • Includes USDOT number, MC number, BOC-3, UCR, MC 150

Trucking Authority Cost

The Differences Between Our Interstate Authority Packages
Call us if you have any questions (702) 333-2430


Package #1: $398 - (USDOT NUMBER PACKAGE) This basic package allows you to add an authority type to any current MC Number.
Plus, Package #1 features the standard $300 US federal filing fee. We recommend this package for all companies with an active MC Number already and have BOC-3 filing. This package is perfect for adding any new authority type to your MC Number.

Package #2: $448 - (DOT AUTHORITY PACKAGE) is an industry-trusted package for countless truckers.
It will take care of your MC Number, BOC-3, and USDOT. Package #2 features the standard $300 US federal filing fee. And it will allow you to generate a new MC Number. That number applies to your Motor Carrier Authority. Our team will also generate a brand-new USDOT Number. If you already have one, we’ll update your USDOT information. Plus, we’ll take care of all your required BOC-3 filing needs. (This refers to the Designation of Process Agents.)

Package #3: $593 - (START A TRUCKING COMPANY PACKAGE) knocks out your MC Number, BOC-3, USDOT, and UCR.
Package #3 features the standard $300 US federal filing fee. And it will allow you to generate a new MC Number. That number applies to your Motor Carrier Authority. Our team will also generate a brand-new USDOT Number. If you already have one, we’ll update your USDOT information. Plus, we’ll take care of all your required BOC-3 and UCR filing needs. (UCR refers to Unified Carrier Registration.) This package applies to UCR registration for the current year. All interstate carriers must have UCR state registration to operate.

Package #4: $1060 -(PACKAGE ON THIS PAGE ABOVE) Here’s one of the most sought-after. 
The package takes care of your MC Number, BOC-3, USDOT, UCR, and IRP/IFTA setup. Our team will even secure State Weight Distance Permits for you. This applies to OR, KY, OR, and NM. This is a premium package that features the standard $300 US federal filing fee. The package will allow you to generate a new MC Number. That number applies to your Motor Carrier Authority. Our team will also generate a brand-new USDOT Number. If you already have one, we’ll update your USDOT information. Plus, we’ll take care of all your required BOC-3 and UCR filing needs. (UCR refers to Unified Carrier Registration.) This package applies to UCR registration for the current year. We’ll also register the setup of your Apportioned Plates through the IRP/IFTA. Package #4 also takes care of the four-state highway use tax permits. (Oregon Weight Distance, New York HUT, New Mexico Weight Distance, and the KYU Number.)

Package #5: $1,198 - (MOTOR CARRIER AUTHORITY PACKAGE) This is our best, most comprehensive package.
This package takes care of your MC Number, BOC-3, USDOT, UCR, and IRP/IFTA setup. Our team will even secure State Weight Distance Permits for you. This applies to OR, KY, OR, and NM. It also includes the setup of a USDOT Drug and Alcohol Consortium. This is an ultra-premium package that features the standard $300 US federal filing fee. The package will allow you to generate a new MC Number. That number applies to your Motor Carrier Authority. Our team will also generate a brand-new USDOT Number. If you already have one, we’ll update your USDOT information. Plus, we’ll take care of all your required BOC-3 and UCR filing needs. (UCR refers to Unified Carrier Registration.) This package applies to UCR registration for the current year. We’ll also register the setup of your Apportioned Plates through the IRP/IFTA. Package #5 also takes care of the four-state highway use tax permits. (Oregon Weight Distance, New York HUT, New Mexico Weight Distance, and the KYU Number.) Our team will also set up a USDOT Drug and Alcohol Consortium on your behalf.
 


Do you or your company need to learn about trucking authority cost information? If so, you're in the right spot. Give us a call with your question:
(702) 333-2430

Our organization's ranked number one when it comes to trucking authority. We work with carriers in every US state. Our team helps ensure that they maintain compliance with the government. Now, let’s go ahead and assess the average trucking authority cost.



What Is the Cost for Obtaining Operating Authority/Trucking Authority?





There's a specific FMCSA cost to secure each individual Operating Authority/trucking authority. It’s a one-time fee of $300. Keep in mind that separate filing fees must get submitted with your interstate authority application. These separate fees refer to the fees for every Authority that you seek. Here is an example.

Say that you need a Household Goods Authority and Passenger Authority. Do not make those requests at different times. Request both authorities at the same time. Since there are two to pay $300 fees, the total owed is $600.

It’s best to keep things simple by combining authority payments. Say that each authority has the same type or classification. (For example, common and contract carrier authorities for the property.) This means that you’ll only have to pay one fee.

Keep in mind that each filing fee is not refundable. The FMCSA has a $14 charge for processes any name change. There is also an $80 fee for requesting the reinstatement of any authority. (Assuming an authority has gotten revoked.) The official FMCSA website provides more information related to Operating Authority fees.




What Types of Operating Authorities/Trucking Authorities Can I File For?





Use the FMCSA OP-1 Application to file for many different operating/trucking authorities. All you need to do is submit an OP-1 Application For Motor Property Carrier and Broker Authority form. Here are the five most common operating authorities that carriers need.

1. Motor Common Carrier of Property except for Household Goods.
2. Motor Contract Carrier of Property except for Household Goods.
3. Motor Contract Carrier of Household Goods.
4. Motor Common Carrier of Household Goods.
5. Broker of Property except for Household Goods.




More About DOT Trucking Authority Cost





Operating in independent trucking can carry quite a few costs. Plus, there’s also plenty of responsibilities and paperwork. A standard leasing service often takes care of those responsibilities. Let’s go over the major costs of securing trucking authority. Keep in mind that the costs are approximate and not definite when you start. 



  1.  LLC registration/sole proprietor. The exact resources and cost vary by state. Its filing start often about $250 to $800 every year.
  2.  UCR: Unified Carrier Registration. This is a standard filing fee across the US of $76.
  3.  Process Agent Designation. It is $120 to file the BOC-3 form. You then have to pay $100 every year to the chosen agent.
  4.  There is a $300 USDOT filing service fee for FMCSA Permanent Authority.
  5.  Fees for an International Registration Plan. The cost of this plan varies. It depends on how many states your truckers will enter. The filing fee could range from $200 to $2,000.
  6.  Base plate fees. These fees vary based on the state. The cost could range from $275 to $1,000 every year.
  7.  USDOT application fee for Heavy use vehicle tax. This refers to IRS Form 2290. The cost ranges from $100 to $550 on an annual basis.
  8.  Vehicle inspection. This is $50 to $100 depending on your state.
  9.  The DOT alcohol and drug physical for carrier safety. This physical is $50 to $100 every 2 years.

Your trucking company doing the USDOT application might have to also pay state fuel and use taxes. It could also have to pay local costs, like parking rental by the hour fees. Once again, all the above figures are estimates. The cost of each estimate might change over time but for an accurate cost email us and let us know what you need.




compliance for Owner Operator Trucking Insurance Requirements





Commercial trucking insurance is not cheap. In fact, it accounts for the majority of increased carrier expenses. Owner Operator insurance can cost about $8,000 to $16,000 every year. But do not despair. Your premium insurance resources will decrease over time depending on your vehicle weight and the trailers you may have.


That’s because the US government will start to recognize that your business is stable. Your premium refers to the federal motor carrier filings mandate of minimum coverage. That figure is $750,000. Did you establish your trucking company as an LLC? If so, Owner Operator trucking insurance will give you an extra level of protection in the home state the company is in.




How Long Does It Take to Get fmcsa Trucking Authority?





It takes around five to seven weeks to complete the trucking authority process. As mentioned above, there are a lot of upfront Operating Authority costs. Plus, you must deal with many US government regulations. But with patience and some saved money, anyone can start their own trucking company.




Is It Better to Have Your Own Authority in Trucking?





Do you want to make a good amount of money through Owner Operator trucking? If so, it’s best to have your own Operating Authority. Receiving Authority will help you earn $2 to $3 per mile depending on the state. This can lead to big-time profits and ROI over time. Plus, you need an Operating Authority to hire your drivers. Otherwise, you can't build a multi-truck fleet/enterprise.




Can You Get Trucking motor carrier Authority Without a Truck?





Our resources allow getting an interstate Motor Carrier Authority without having a truck. But here is what you do need: liability insurance. Almost all insurance companies will not insure carriers without applying coverage to trucks. You are welcome to apply for an MC number at any time.




How Do I Get My Own Interstate Trucking Authority?





Here is our organization’s patented plan to help our clients get their own DOT and MC authority cost. Follow this plan to become your own boss in a short amount of time.


1. Create your business entity. Do so with the help of an accountant. The accountant can provide crucial recommendations. He or she will discuss the best business type to use. Plus, an accountant can go over different tax scenarios.
2. Secure your USDOT number.
3. Secure your active MC number.
4. Get commercial trucking insurance.
5. Designate a national process agent and resources.
6. Complete the UCR.
7. Perform truck signage.




Can I Sell My Trucking Authority?





No, as of right now, you cannot sell a Motor Carrier Authority. You also cannot sell truck tags or your ICC authority number. But you can file to seek a refund on 2290. The buyer of the truck must tag it. That buyer has to also pay the 2010 2290 balance for the resources.





(Apply for your Federal carrier compliance registration correctly by our company above by pressing the orange button at the top of this page.)         

Customer Reviews

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Gloria Costa

04/12/2021

We're so relieved of having the exact Trucking Authority Package that fits our needs. After answering a couple of questions, Moving Authority experts offered just what we needed. I highly recommend these guys.

Marvin Mundell

03/31/2021

Package #4 met all our needs. We got the ability to go long distances in our business for the right price. Excellent service.

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Did You Know

Question In American English, the word "truck" has historically been preceded by a word describing the type of vehicle, such as a "tanker truck". In British English, preference would lie with "tanker" or "petrol tanker".

Question During the latter part of the 20th century, we saw a decline of the trucking culture. Coinciding with this decline was a decline of the image of truck drivers, as they became negatively stigmatized. As a result of such negativity, it makes sense that truck drivers were frequently portrayed as the "bad guy(s)" in movies.

Question There are certain characteristics of a truck that makes it an "off-road truck". They generally standard, extra heavy-duty highway-legal trucks. Although legal, they have off-road features like front driving axle and special tires for applying it to tasks such as logging and construction. The purpose-built off-road vehicles are unconstrained by weighing limits, such as the Libherr T 282B mining truck.

Question Medium trucks are larger than light but smaller than heavy trucks. In the US, they are defined as weighing between 13,000 and 33,000 pounds (6,000 and 15,000 kg). For the UK and the EU, the weight is between 3.5 and 7.5 tons (3.9 and 8.3 tons). Local delivery and public service (dump trucks, garbage trucks, and fire-fighting trucks) are around this size.

Question The interstate moving industry in the United States maintains regulation by the FMCSA, which is part of the USDOT. With only a small staff (fewer than 20 people) available to patrol hundreds of moving companies, enforcement is difficult. As a result of such a small staff, there are in many cases, no regulations that qualify moving companies as 'reliable'. Without this guarantee, it is difficult to a consumer to make a choice. Although, moving companies can provide and often display a DOT license.

Question In some states, a business route is designated by adding the letter "B" after the number instead of placing a "Business" sign above it. For example, Arkansas signs US business route 71 as "US 71B". On some route shields and road signs, the word "business" is shortened to just "BUS". This abbreviation is rare and usually avoided to prevent confusion with bus routes.

Question DOT officers of each state are generally in charge of the enforcement of the Hours of Service (HOS). These are sometimes checked when CMVs pass through weigh stations. Drivers found to be in violation of the HOS can be forced to stop driving for a certain period of time. This, in turn, may negatively affect the motor carrier's safety rating. Requests to change the HOS are a source of debate. Unfortunately, many surveys indicate drivers routinely get away with violating the HOS. Such facts have started yet another debate on whether motor carriers should be required to us EOBRs in their vehicles. Relying on paper-based log books does not always seem to enforce the HOS law put in place for the safety of everyone.

Question The term "lorry" has an ambiguous origin, but it is likely that its roots were in the rail transport industry. This is where the word is known to have been used in 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage) specifically a large flat wagon. It may derive from the verb lurry, which means to pull or tug, of uncertain origin. It's expanded meaning was much more exciting as "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods", and has been in usage since 1911. Previously, unbeknownst to most, the word "lorry" was used for a fashion of big horse-drawn goods wagon.

Question

Compliance, Safety, and Accountability (CSA) are fundamental to the FMCSA's compliance program. The purpose of the CSA program is to oversee and focus on motor carriers' safety performance. To enforce such safety regulations, the CSA conducts roadside inspections and crash investigations. The program issues violations when instances of noncompliance with CSA safety regulations are exposed.
 
Unfortunately, the CSA's number of safety investigation teams and state law enforcement partners are rather small in comparison to the millions of CMV companies and commercial driver license (CDL) holders. A key factor in the CSA program is known as the Safety Measurement System (SMS). This system relies on data analysis to identify unsafe companies to arrange them for safety interventions. SMS is incredibly helpful to CSA in finding and holding companies accountable for safety performance.  

Question There are many different types of trailers that are designed to haul livestock, such as cattle or horses. Most commonly used are the stock trailer, which is enclosed on the bottom but has openings at approximately. This opening is at the eye level of the animals in order to allow ventilation. A horse trailer is a much more elaborate form of stock trailer. Generally horses are hauled with the purpose of attending or participating in competition. Due to this, they must be in peak physical condition, so horse trailers are designed for the comfort and safety of the animals. They're typically well-ventilated with windows and vents along with specifically designed suspension. Additionally, horse trailers have internal partitions that assist animals staying upright during travel. It's also to protect other horses from injuring each other in transit. There are also larger horse trailers that may incorporate more specialized areas for horse tack. They may even include elaborate quarters with sleeping areas, bathroom, cooking facilities etc.

Question The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) issues Hours of Service regulations. At the same time, they govern the working hours of anyone operating a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in the United States. Such regulations apply to truck drivers, commercial and city bus drivers, and school bus drivers who operate CMVs. With these rules in place, the number of daily and weekly hours spent driving and working is limited. The FMCSA regulates the minimum amount of time drivers must spend resting between driving shifts. In regards to intrastate commerce, the respective state's regulations apply.

Question Relocation, or moving, is the process of vacating a fixed location, such as a residence or business, and settling in a different one. A move might be to a nearby location such as in the same neighborhood or a much farther location in a different city or even a different country. Moving usually includes packing up all belongings, transferring them to the new location, and unpacking them. It will also be necessary to update administrative information. This includes tasks such as notifying the post office, changing registration data, change of insurance, services etc. It is important to remember this step in the relocation process. 

Question The American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO) was organized and founded on December 12, 1914. On November 13, 1973, the name was altered to the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. This slight change in name reflects a broadened scope of attention towards all modes of transportation. Despite the implications of the name change, most of the activities it is involved in still gravitate towards highways.

Question Business routes generally follow the original routing of the numbered route through a city or town. Beginning in the 1930s and lasting thru the 1970s was an era marking a peak in large-scale highway construction in the United States. U.S. Highways and Interstates were typically built in particular phases. Their first phase of development began with the numbered route carrying traffic through the center of a city or town. The second phase involved the construction of bypasses around the central business districts of the towns they began. As bypass construction continued, original parts of routes that had once passed straight thru a city would often become a "business route".

Question

The concept of a bypass is a simple one. It is a road or highway that purposely avoids or "bypasses" a built-up area, town, or village. Bypasses were created with the intent to let through traffic flow without having to get stuck in local traffic. In general they are supposed to reduce congestion in a built-up area. By doing so, road safety will greatly improve.
 
A bypass designated for trucks traveling a long distance, either commercial or otherwise, is called a truck route.

Question With the onset of trucking culture, truck drivers often became portrayed as protagonists in popular media. Author Shane Hamilton, who wrote "Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy", focuses on truck driving. He explores the history of trucking and while connecting it development in the trucking industry. It is important to note, as Hamilton discusses the trucking industry and how it helps the so-called big-box stores dominate the U.S. marketplace. Hamilton certainly takes an interesting perspective historically speaking.

Question Smoke and the Bandit was released in 1977, becoming the third-highest grossing movie. Following only behind Star Wars Episode IV and Close Encounter of the Third Kind, all three movies making an impact on popular culture. Conveniently, during that same year, CB Bears debuted as well. The Saturday morning cartoon features mystery-solving bears who communicate by CB radio. As the 1970's decade began to end and the 80's broke through, the trucking phenomenon had wade. With the rise of cellular phone technology, the CB radio was no longer popular with passenger vehicles, but, truck drivers still use it today.

Question In 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.

Question Commercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you. Just to name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes. They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways. They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.

Question Known as a truck in the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Puerto Rico, it is essentially a motor vehicle designed to transport cargo. Otherwise known as a lorry in the United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa, and Indian Subcontinent. Trucks vary not only in their types, but also in size, power, and configuration, the smallest being mechanically like an automobile. Commercial trucks may be very large and powerful, configured to mount specialized equipment. These are necessary in the case of fire trucks, concrete mixers, and suction excavators etc.