Tim's Hauling and Moving, LLC

USDOT # 3003438
11474 Boulder Drive
Orland Park, IL 60467
Orland Park
Illinois
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (708) 769-5050
Company Site:

Moving with Tim's Hauling and Moving, LLC




See More Moving companies in Orland Park, Illinois

Your Tim's Hauling and Moving, LLC Reviews

required
required (not published)

There are currently no reviews

Did You Know

QuestionWith the partial deregulation of the trucking industry in 1980 by the Motor Carrier Act, trucking companies increased. The workforce wasdrasticallyde-unionized. As a result, drivers received a lower payoverall.Losing its spotlight in the popular culture, trucking had become less intimate as some unspoken competition broke out.However, the deregulation only increased the competition and productivity with the trucking industry as a whole. This was beneficial to the America consumer by reducing costs.In 1982 the Surface TransportationAssistanceAct established a federalminimumtruck weight limits. Thus, trucks were finally standardized truck size and weight limits across the country.This was also put in to place so that across country traffic on the Interstate Highways resolved the issue of the 'barrier states'.

QuestionSignage of business routes varies, depending on the type of route they are derived from. Business routes paralleling U.S. and state highways usually have exactly the same shield shapes and nearly the same overall appearance as the routes they parallel, with a rectangular plate reading "BUSINESS" placed above the shield (either supplementing or replacing the directional plate, depending on the preference of the road agency). In order to better identify and differentiate alternate routes from the routes they parallel, some states such as Maryland are beginning to use green shields for business routes off U.S. highways. In addition, Maryland uses a green shield for business routes off state highways with the word "BUSINESS" in place of "MARYLAND" is used for a state route.

QuestionAs of January 1, 2000, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA)was establishedas its own separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation. This came about under the "Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999".The FMCSAis basedin Washington, D.C., employing more than 1,000 people throughout all 50 States, including in the District of Columbia.Their staff dedicates themselves to the improvement of safety among commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and to saving lives.

Question

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period.At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.
The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty tobe usedfor meals and rest breaks.This meant that the weekly maxwas limitedto 60 hours over 7 days (non-dailydrivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

Question1941 was a tough era to live through.Yet, President Roosevelt appointed a special committee to explore the idea of a "national inter-regional highway" system. Unfortunately, the committee's progress came to a halt with the rise of the World War II.After the war was over, the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1944 authorized the designation of what are not termed 'Interstate Highways'.However, he did not include any funding program to build such highways.With limited resources came limited progress until President Dwight D. Eisenhower came along in 1954. He renewed interest in the 1954 plan. Although, this began and long and bitter debate between various interests.Generally, the opposing sides were considering where such funding would come from such as rail, truck, tire, oil, and farm groups. All who would overpay for the new highways and how.