Published Tariff

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Product Code: 25

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Product Description:

  • A tariff is a legal document that must be published by carrier
  • 49 CFR ยง 1312.2 Requirement to Publish and file a Tariff
  • Tariff specifies the exact prices, services, rules, regulation

Published Tariffs & Contracts for Moving



Welcome to your number one source for general published tariff information. January 1, 2008, was an important date for interstate carriers. That’s when the Surface Transportation Board put a new policy in place. The policy stated that carriers have to take part in collective rate-marking. Collective rate-marking is the same concept as collective tariff-making. This means that carriers do not have immunity. Instead, they now risk anti-trust prosecution. So, when can prosecution take place? It happens when carriers operate collectively with separate carriers using copied tariffs. Avoiding anti-trust prosecution is important. Otherwise, carriers will not have a good standing with the Department of Justice. This is why all carriers should use custom published tariff services. Having published tariffs will help prevent legal problems from occurring.

Carriers are not the only entity that benefits from using published tariffs. The tariffs also provide consumers with advantages. That’s because there are options for charges related to line-haul services. In fact, there are tons of volume-based measurement options for published tariffs. Here are the four most common tariff charges.
1. Weight.
2. Cubic feet.
3. Cubic meters.
4. Charges by the hour.
These options get called "the menu of differing accessorial services." Each service should get marked at a competitive rate.
Why? So consumers have an incentive to book moves with a carrier company. Custom published tariffs will give customers plenty of controlled high-quality options. 



What Is a Published Tariff?



Published tariffs are legal documents. All interstate motor carriers have to publish the documents. So, why should they publish them? Here’s the main reason. Published tariffs convey provisions of the services provided by carriers. For example, your customers can learn the following information through published tariffs.

1. Your moving company’s exact prices.
2. The government regulations that your company adheres to.
3. The rules that moving companies follow.
4. The services that your company provides by common carrier.
5. The specific classifications within the published tariff.
6. The moving and transportation policies of your company such as distance price, Ect.
7. All other provisions of services that your board provides.

Keep in mind that carriers organization is bound by terms within each published tariff. A carrier has to provide access to the specific prices/services that each tariff lists like distance via weight & cubic footage, and state any rules pricing for a household goods shipper



How Can Carriers Use Published Tariffs?



The use of published tariffs helps ensure that carriers stick to their exact rates. This means that each customer will get charged in a fair and ethical manner. Carriers should keep the following notion in mind. They cannot offer customers services that aren’t listed in their published tariffs. Plus, carriers can't charge consumers less/more than a published tariff rate states.

Each service charge must match what the tariff’s rate is. Here is an example. Say a tariff price is $0.50 per pound for a 1,900 lb. cross-country move. This means the carrier has to charge $0.50 no matter what happens. That carrier cannot charge a penny more or a penny less. This concept refers to 49 USC section 13702(a)(2).



How Should Carriers DO publication to Create Published Tariffs?



Carriers have options when it comes to making published tariffs. Here are the three most common actions that carriers can take.

1. They can compose their own tariffs.
2. They can subscribe to generic services for published tariffs.
3. Law-minded professionals can write individual-published tariffs on behalf of their clients. In fact, our organization takes care of #2 and #3 for many carriers across the United States for household goods tariff publication.

All published tariffs must adhere to relevant federal regulations. That’s why it’s often best for a third-party to publish tariffs on behalf of clients. A third-party makes sure that carriers remain in great standing with the government. Professionals also ensure prices/services match the actions that take place during moves. Remember- if something is not listed in the tariff, then it shouldn’t happen. It’s as simple as that.



Be Cautious When Providing your moving Published Tariff



The key is to exercise a great deal of Caution when it comes to making generic Tariff. Otherwise, motor carriers risk making very expensive mistakes. Here is an example. Say there’s a carrier using a tariff that is generic. And that tariff confirms that there are line-haul charges. The line haul charges get based on how much the property weighs. But then the carrier chooses to charge based on cubic feet. This is against the law. In fact, it’s a huge mistake that is both a criminal and civil violation. Here’s another example. Say that a carrier has a different generic published tariff. And the tariff doesn't feature provisions about long-carry, stairs, storage, or anything else. What result does this have? It means that the carrier cannot charge the consumer for the services.



The Discount Policy of Published Tariffs



Some carriers make a crucial mistake when it comes to Tariff publication. They assume that the prices of tariffs can get discounted. This cannot ever happen. No tariff prices and rates cannot get discounted. This applies to both individual and random discounts. Keep in mind that this concept refers to accessorial/line haul services. 

Once again, carriers have to charge controlled published tariff rates. Final prices and rates must conform to what’s written search on each specific tariff. This notion applies more than discounts. It also applies to returning part of rates for consumers. Keep in mind that carriers can make changes/amendments to tariff prices and rates. But every change must receive proper documentation. This is the only form of legally tariff publication discount that can take place. Third-party services can help carriers make the right record-keeping decisions. Doing so will ensure that the law gets followed, according to 49 USC section 13702(a)(2).



The Importance of Replacing Current Published Tariffs



Many carriers get confused about replacing their current tariffs. They want to have the ability to use brand-new published tariffs. Well, here is some good news. The concept of replacing published tariffs with updated ones is not illegal. Motor carriers can replace their generic tariffs at any time. This is another reason why publishing custom tariffs is so important. It positions companies to have the freedom to change a lot of service information. This leads to adjusting prices and rates. So, what is the end result of making these legal adjustments? Better customer service for all clients and consumers.



Published Tariff Violations



There are strict penalties when it comes to Tariff publication violations. The penalties are civil, criminal, or oftentimes—both. It depends on the officer who search in specific tariff infractions that may have taken place. There are two common situations that lead to the violation of tariff provisions.
1. The carrier undercharges a customer.
2. The carrier overcharges a customer.
Penalties for either one are both criminal and civil. Say that a carrier under/overcharges a customer based on the tariff rate after the search provides evidence. That carrier could face a civil penalty worth up to $100,000 for each separate infraction. Plus, the carrier could also face a separate financial fine. The basis of criminal charges is also important. The carrier owner/associates could face two years in prison for every infraction. This is according to 49 USC section 14903(b).



Are Carriers Responsible for Agent-Caused Published Tariff Provision Violations?



Yes, carriers are responsible when agents make tariff publication mistakes. This also applies to subcontractors. Carriers are often punished with criminal and civil penalties for agent-caused mistakes. Here is an example. Say a subcontractor gets hired by a carrier to do a pickup. And that subcontractor charges a different price than what’s written on the carrier’s tariff. What does this mean? The motor carrier has violated civil and criminals laws and regulations. Thus, the carrier gets held responsible for the subcontractor’s (or agent’s) mistake. This is according to 49 USC section 14903(c).



Contact Us Today for Help With Published Tariffs



Do you have any questions about tariff publishing? If so, give our organization a call or email right now. Our team can help you understand the law and all federal rules/regulations for a USDOT number filing. The mission of our company is to ensure that carriers provide high-quality tariffs. Plus, we will even build published tariffs on your behalf. And we will do so faster than our competitors. We look forward to providing tariff publishing services for you and your employees. Please ask for Arbitration Program as well.

Customer Reviews

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Salib Ghornni

11/12/2020

This is the best company to help with the confuseing tariff and paperwork. i didnt know what to do and i dont want to keep my company but now i am so happy and i have hired more employee. Thank YOU to this team for help me make a better moving company. They help me so so so so much -Salib.

Mary T.

10/06/2020

This is excellent and very helpful.

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Did You Know

Question As we've learned the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956 was crucial in the construction of the Interstate Highway System. Described as an interconnected network of the controlled-access freeway. It also allowed larger trucks to travel at higher speeds through rural and urban areas alike. This act was also the first to allow the first federal largest gross vehicle weight limits for trucks, set at 73,208 pounds (33,207 kg). The very same year, Malcolm McLean pioneered modern containerized intermodal shipping. This allowed for the more efficient transfer of cargo between truck, train, and ships.

Question The Motor Carrier Act, passed by Congress in 1935, replace the code of competition. The authorization the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) place was to regulate the trucking industry. Since then the ICC has been long abolished, however, it did quite a lot during its time. Based on the recommendations given by the ICC, Congress enacted the first hours of services regulation in 1938. This limited driving hours of truck and bus drivers. In 1941, the ICC reported that inconsistent weight limitation imposed by the states cause problems to effective interstate truck commerce.

Question

Very light trucks. Popular in Europe and Asia, many mini-trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles, usually with monocoque bodies. Specialized designs with substantial frames such as the Italian Piaggio shown here are based upon Japanese designs (in this case by Daihatsu) and are popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities that often have very narrow alleyways. Regardless of the name, these small trucks serve a wide range of uses. In Japan, they are regulated under the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break on taxes for buying a smaller and less-powerful vehicle (currently, the engine is limited to 660 ccs {0.66L} displacement). These vehicles are used as on-road utility vehicles in Japan. These Japanese-made mini trucks that were manufactured for on-road use are competing with off-road ATVs in the United States, and import regulations require that these mini trucks have a 25 mph (40 km/h) speed governor as they are classified as low-speed vehicles. These vehicles have found uses in construction, large campuses (government, university, and industrial), agriculture, cattle ranches, amusement parks, and replacements for golf carts.Major mini truck manufacturers and their brands: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishi Minicab, Subaru Sambar, Suzuki Carry
 
As with many things in Europe and Asia, the illusion of delicacy and proper manners always seems to attract tourists. Popular in Europe and Asia, mini trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles with monochrome bodies. Such specialized designs with such great frames such as the Italian Piaggio, based upon Japanese designs. In this case it was based upon Japanese designs made by Daihatsu. These are very popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities, which often have very narrow alleyways. Despite whatever name they are called, these very light trucks serve a wide variety of purposes.
 
Yet, in Japan they are regulated under the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break in taxes for buying a small and less-powerful vehicle. Currently, the engine is limited to 660 cc [0.66L] displacement. These vehicles began being used as on-road utility vehicles in Japan. Classified as a low speed vehicle, these Japanese-made mini trucks were manufactured for on-road use for competing the the off-road ATVs in the United States. Import regulations require that the mini trucks have a 25 mph (40km/h) speed governor. Again, this is because they are low speed vehicles.
 
However, these vehicles have found numerous amounts of ways to help the community. They invest money into the government, universities, amusement parks, and replacements for golf cars. They have some major Japanese mini truck manufacturarers as well as brands such as: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishit Minicab, Subaru Sambar, and Suzuki Carry.

Question In 1971, author and director Steven Spielberg, debuted his first feature length film. His made-for-tv film, Duel, portrayed a truck driver as an anonymous stalker. Apparently there seems to be a trend in the 70's to negatively stigmatize truck drivers.

Question Trucks of the era mostly used two-cylinder engines and had a carrying capacity of 1,500 to 2,000 kilograms (3,300 to 4,400 lb). In 1904, 700 heavy trucks were built in the United States, 1000 in 1907, 6000 in 1910, and 25000 in 1914. A Benz truck modified by Netphener company (1895)

Question Many modern trucks are powered by diesel engines, although small to medium size trucks with gas engines exist in the United States. The European Union rules that vehicles with a gross combination of mass up to 3,500 kg (7,716 lb) are also known as light commercial vehicles. Any vehicles exceeding that weight are known as large goods vehicles.

Question In some states, a business route is designated by adding the letter "B" after the number instead of placing a "Business" sign above it. For example, Arkansas signs US business route 71 as "US 71B". On some route shields and road signs, the word "business" is shortened to just "BUS". This abbreviation is rare and usually avoided to prevent confusion with bus routes.

Question

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.
 
The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

Question Business routes generally follow the original routing of the numbered route through a city or town. Beginning in the 1930s and lasting thru the 1970s was an era marking a peak in large-scale highway construction in the United States. U.S. Highways and Interstates were typically built in particular phases. Their first phase of development began with the numbered route carrying traffic through the center of a city or town. The second phase involved the construction of bypasses around the central business districts of the towns they began. As bypass construction continued, original parts of routes that had once passed straight thru a city would often become a "business route".

Question The 1950's were quite different than the years to come. They were more likely to be considered "Knights of the Road", if you will, for helping stranded travelers. In these times truck drivers were envied and were viewed as an opposition to the book "The Organization Man". Bestseller in 1956, author William H. Whyte's novel describes "the man in the gray flannel suit", who sat in an office every day. He's describing a typical office style job that is very structured with managers watching over everyone. Truck drivers represented the opposite of all these concepts. Popular trucking songs glorified the life of drivers as independent "wanderers". Yet, there were attempts to bring back the factory style efficiency, such as using tachnographs. Although most attempts resulted in little success. Drivers routinely sabotaged and discovered new ways to falsify the machine's records.

Question In 1984 the animated TV series The Transformers told the story of a group of extraterrestrial humanoid robots. However, it just so happens that they disguise themselves as automobiles. Their leader of the Autobots clan, Optimus Prime, is depicted as an awesome semi-truck.

Question

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry. There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine. Improvement in transmissions is yet another source, just like the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.
 
The first state weight limits for trucks were determined and put in place in 1913. Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads. As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and a maximum speed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks to mostly urban areas.

Question 1941 was a tough era to live through. Yet, President Roosevelt appointed a special committee to explore the idea of a "national inter-regional highway" system. Unfortunately, the committee's progress came to a halt with the rise of the World War II. After the war was over, the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1944 authorized the designation of what are not termed 'Interstate Highways'. However, he did not include any funding program to build such highways. With limited resources came limited progress until President Dwight D. Eisenhower came along in 1954. He renewed interest in the 1954 plan. Although, this began and long and bitter debate between various interests. Generally, the opposing sides were considering where such funding would come from such as rail, truck, tire, oil, and farm groups. All who would overpay for the new highways and how.

Question A Ministry of Transport (or) Transportation is responsible for transportation within a country. Administration usually falls upon the Minister for Transport. The term may also be applied to the departments or other government agencies administering transport in a nation who do not use ministers. There are various and vast responsibilities for agencies to oversee such as road safety. Others may include civil aviation, maritime transport, rail transport and so on. They continue to develop government transportation policy and organize public transit. All while trying to maintain and construct infrastructural projects. Some ministries have additional responsibilities in related policy areas as mentioned above.

Question The American Moving & Storage Association (AMSA) is a non-profit trade association. AMSA represents members of the professional moving industry primarily based in the United States. The association consists of approximately 4,000 members. They consist of van lines, their agents, independent movers, forwarders, and industry suppliers. However, AMSA does not represent the self-storage industry.

Question Moving companies that operate within the borders of a particular state are usually regulated by the state DOT. Sometimes the public utility commission in that state will take care of it. This only applies to some of the U.S. states such as in California (California Public Utilities Commission) or Texas (Texas Department of Motor Vehicles. However, no matter what state you are in it is always best to make sure you are compliant with that state

Question There many reasons for moving, each one with a unique and specific reason as to why. Relocation services, employee relocation, or workforce mobility can create a range of processes. This process of transferring employees, their families, and/or entire departments of a business to a new location can be difficult. Like some types of employee benefits, these matters are dealt with by human resources specialists within a corporation.

Question Many people are familiar with this type of moving, using truck rental services, or borrowing similar hardware, is known as DIY moving. Whoever is renting a truck or trailer large enough to carry their household goods may obtain moving equipment if necessary. Equipment may be items such as dollies, furniture pads, and cargo belts to protect furniture and to ease the moving process.