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  1. Moving Out: Is It Worth Cleaning Yourself?
  2. Hiring Move Out Cleaning Services 
  3. Cleaning Service Prices
  4. Paying Your Landlord to Clean
  5. Moving Out & Cleaning Yourself Is An Option Too

1. Moving Out: Is It Worth Cleaning Yourself?

When the time comes and you’re moving out of your place you’re left with problems about cleaning typical dirt that accumulates over time. Is it worth cleaning yourself? What about your deposit? Is it that 200 or 300 bucks really worth so much time and effort that’s necessary to clean up your apartment or home? Depending on your rental deposit, all that hard work might not be worth it. You have a few options, you can clean your home yourself, hire cleaning services, or use cleaning services through your landlord. It seems like getting an estimate for each is the best idea, although if you can clean it yourself with minimal work than why not put a little effort into it and save money by getting your whole deposit back

2. Hiring Move Out Cleaning Services 

However, if your deposit was a larger sum, then it might be worth paying for cleaning services to provide cleaning services like your home hasn’t seen in quite some time. If you require moving out cleaning services, be prepared to spend some money. The deeper clean your place requires, the more expensive you can expect the cleaning services to be.

3. Cleaning Service Prices

What you can expect based on general cleaning (dusting, scrubbing, vacuuming, mopping) is about $200 or so per 1,000 sq. ft. in a place. Although some places charge for cleaning based on how many rooms there are to clean. Regardless, moving out cleaning services tend to stay around the same prices. Unless you have other cleaning needs due to messing the apartment or home up worse than the usual wear and tear prices should be around the following:

  • Carpet cleaning: for a whole house it can run from $75 to $200 based on size and stains
  • Windows: they can generally be about $5 per window and $3 per screen unless they’re large or wall-size, then prices can jump in price
  • Polishing/Waxing: floors can be from $0.25 to $0.50 per sq. ft. however, most cleaning services have a minimum for certain size homes which makes less favorable.
  • Furniture: typically starts around $50 to $100 to get stains out or any odors (though you generally take furniture with you or sell it if you can’t)


In general, if you have an apartment that is decently sized and needs more than the average cleaning will cost at least around $250 to $400 to get it cleaned professionally.

4. Paying Your Landlord to Clean

On the other hand, your landlord might also provide a cleaning service to your place as well. Whatever the cost is will be taken out of your security deposit. So if your security deposit was $500 and the cleaning fees for the landlord was $600, you will be left to pay the $100 difference. In most case, people would be fine paying that $100 difference, however, when the difference comes to a much larger difference to pay is when it gets tricky.

5. Moving Out & Cleaning Yourself Is An Option Too

Of course, you can always clean the apartment or home yourself too before hiring a cleaning service as well and that can lower the cost. If you put in a little work here and there it's not so bad. But if you’re cleaning expenses costs as much as a professional’s, just hire a cleaning service.

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Did You Know

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