Claims Package

$525.00 Only

Product Code: 14

11 Reviews

Product Description:

  • Claim Procedures Package
  • For Processing Loss & Damage Claims
  • Damaged or lost while in care of mover it is a right to file
  • Claims Package help you Choose to accept or deny the settlement
  • It is the law to process household goods damage & loss claims
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Moving Claims Packet


A moving claims package can benefit both moving companies and customers. Why? Because sometimes mistakes happen and household goods might not arrive in one piece. Or, some items might not arrive at all. You cannot let these situations affect the reputation/financial results of your company. Instead, you should consider having a moving claims package.

What is a moving claims package? It is a series of policies and actions. Both of which can protect you and your company from suffering in a financial or legal manner. Our organization can help you and your team create a custom-moving claims package. It will help your staff stay on top of everything that is moving claims-related.



What Are Moving Claims & Moving Claims Packets?



You cannot understand moving claims packages without having some knowledge about moving claims. Moving claims get filed by customers when they feel a mistake has taken place. Many people assume that the claims process starts after delivery. But that’s not the case. The moving claims process begins before every move. This is when items get organized and inventoried. In other words, it is the pack out phase.

Ensuring that your employees conduct the pack out phase with care is important. It will help prevent moving claims from getting made against your company. Another key action is to make sure that your customers take part in the pack out phase.

This is so they will have a better sense of which items are getting moved. Your moving claims package should include specific processes like these. The purpose is to keep both your employees and customers on the same page.


DOT Moving Authority phone(702) 333-2430

The Detailed Inventory Within Moving Claims Packets



As part of your moving claims package, there will be a detailed inventory process. The inventory lists important details about every item. For example, electronic devices should have their serial numbers listed. Kitchen appliances should have their model and brand names listed.

Actions like these will help speed-up any moving claims process. The less ambiguous the inventory, the faster the claims process. Your claims package can also feature a high-value list. These are the items that are at least one of two things.

1. The items are expensive.

2. The items are one-of-a-kind and impossible to replace. For example, antique furniture is an item that cannot get replaced. 

Providing a high-value list will do more than benefit your company. The lists will also help out your customers, should loss or damage take place. What’s another way to make a detailed inventory within a moving claims package? It is to have your employees take pictures of the items in every room. This applies to the high-value items more than the low-value ones.


This is an example of how staying organized will prepare you for dealing with any moving claims. For example, a customer could state that the television got damaged. But you cannot go along with anything a customer says. Pictures serve as proof that items were already damaged before moves took place.



The Two Forms of Liability Within Moving Claims Packets



The content of a moving claims package refers to two types of liability within US law. After all, the law states that all moving companies must have liability. And that liability applies toward all transported household goods. The first form of liability concerns Full (Replacement) Value Protection.

The second type's called Released Value protection. Both concepts should get detailed inside any moving claims package. Why? So that your employees understand how protection works. And so that they can apply the correct moving charges. In fact, let’s go ahead and examine both forms of claims liability.


DOT Moving Authority phone(702) 333-2430

Moving allegation Package: Full (Replacement) Value Protection



A claims package should detail how full replacement value protection affects customers. This is the most comprehensive form of protection that customers have. The purpose is simple. It's for customers that feel they need complete protection for their household goods. But that protection comes at a price. It makes the cost of total charges for customers increase.


Your moving claims package can include a section for full replacement value protection. It should explain how the protection is part of the initial estimate process. This is so potential customers can decide whether the protection is worth it to them. Say that a customer agrees to pay for full replacement value protection.

His or her goods then get shipped once the specific terms of liability become official. But there is one exception to this concept. Customers can opt to waive their full value protection. That’s why a moving claims package includes a section about waiving the protection. 




Moving Claims Packet: Two Liability-Related Options for Movers




Once again, the moving claims package needs to provide specific instructions. Those instructions benefit more than your customers. They also benefit your employees. Say that you have a customer who has full value protection. And that customer’s goods then end up destroyed, damaged, or lost. Unless there are exceptions within the moving tariff, there are two options. Your company can take one of the following actions:




1. Replace the goods with similar ones. Those goods should have an equal value to the original goods. Or, instead, your company can compensate the customer. The compensation value has to adhere to the goods’ total replacement costs. 



2. The goods can get restored or repaired. But this means the new goods have to be in the same state as the original goods. Once again, this is why detailed inventories are important. They convey the specific condition of every item that gets moved. Your moving company has one other option here. It can opt to, instead, pay for the total cost of repairs.







Figuring Out Total Costs 





When it comes to moving claims, determining the total cost is no easy task. Sometimes specific deductible levels influence what the total cost is. But this concept varies because it adheres to a case-by-case format. Some moving companies offer very cheap lowest-amount values.

Others provide very generous amounts. Your company’s specific policy should get included inside the moving claims package. Again, this is for the sake of both your workers and your customers. 

Keep in mind that customers can state certain values for shipments. This can make the cost of moves fluctuate across a pool of customers. So, how do you determine a shipment’s full value protection? Here is the moving industry standard.

It is 60 cents per pound multiplied by the weight of the entire shipment. All full value protection charges should get written into each moving tariff. Plus, the charge-composition process should get featured inside your moving claims package.



Released Value Protection



A quality moving claims package includes information about released value protection. Released value protection is the official moving industry term for minimal protection. It is the best format for customers to preventing themselves from receiving extra charges under the USDOT number law.


The key here is that all interstate moving companies hold liability. But the liability is very, very limited. In fact, all items are not covered beyond a total of sixty cents per pound. That figure applies to all moving goods with no exceptions. Your moving claims forms package should make this concept very clear. 



Here is an example of how released value protection within moving works. Let’s say a $2,000 desktop computer gets destroyed during its transportation. The computer weighs twenty pounds.

Your company’s liability standing would mean you wouldn’t have to pay much. In fact, your company would only have to pay the customer $20.00. Why?
Because 60 cents multiplied by 20 (pounds) comes out to $20.00. 



Contact Us Today for Help Creating a Package


DOT Moving Authority phone(702) 333-2430

Do you need advice for creating a moving claims package?
Or, do you want a third-party to create it for you?

Either way, we’ve got you covered.

Moving Authority can assist you with all your moving claims package needs. Our mission is to help you create a package that will benefit both your workers and employees.

As a result, you could see improvements in both ROI and profit margins. So, feel free to give us a call right now. We look forward to ensuring that you have a state-of-the-art moving claims package.

Customer Reviews

Sean Cuevas

09/03/2021

At first, I did not see the utility of this service. Still, after a couple of incidents that cost us time and money, we decided to purchase the Moving Claim Package. The number of incidents was significantly reduced, and the organization improved considerably. It is an excellent tool.

Rashmyea Rahaman

07/22/2021

Our new Claim Package is quite complete. It covers from goods packaging to delivery. It's very detailed and instructive. I recommend getting it.

Fernando Farrar

05/25/2021

I had Moving Authority create a custom-moving claims package for my moving company. It was always a hassle to deal with them beforehand. Now the whole moving process has been covered. I'm relieved.

Tucker Pybus

05/13/2021

Being a new carrier, I was concerned about complaints and how to deal with them. Fortunately, I came across Moving Authority's Claim Package, and it had everything I needed on this subject. We are now prepared from pre to post inventory and feel very good about it.

Abrahm Gilmore

05/05/2021

Moving Claim Package from Moving Authority was the best solution to manage my moving company claims. I enjoyed the way we'll be processing the inventory now. So neat. Highly recommended.

Tito Lestrange

04/12/2021

Now we're covered. Our new moving claim package fits perfectly. Moving Authority assisted me any time I had questions. They are very skillful.

Hermon Burdick

04/02/2021

We are so gratified with the Claims Package we got from Moving Authority. What I really like about it is the high-value tool at that low cost. Besides, Moving Authority experts provided me terrific customer service. I'll certainly keep on working with them.

Conant Scroop

03/05/2021

Our preliminary inventory list wasn't very detailed, so the moving claim management was inefficient. I bought the claim package from Moving Authority, and I got completely covered.

Beth Harris

03/01/2021

After filing a claim to the USPS, I discovered the importance of having a claims package that protects us from any legal process that threatens our company. For a low price, Moving Authority excellently covered our needs.

Daniel Felix - The Mover Guys LLC

02/18/2021

It seemed simple, but it was not. Luckily I got the Claims Package.

David K.

10/07/2020

It really helps us and our customers.

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“The association of truckers with cowboys and related myths was perhaps most obvious during the urban-cowboy craze of the late 1970s, a period that saw middle-class urbanites wearing cowboy clothing and patronizing simulated cowboy nightclubs. During this time, at least four truck driver movies appeared, CB radio became popular, and truck drivers were prominently featured in all forms of popular media.” — Lawrence J. Ouellet

In 1999, The Simpsons episode Maximum Homerdrive aired. It featured Homer and Bart making a delivery for a truck driver named Red after he unexpectedly dies of 'food poisoning'.

The American Trucking Associations initiated in 1985 with the intent to improve the industry's image. With public opinion declining the association tried numerous moves. One such move was changing the name of the "National Truck Rodeo" to the "National Driving Championship". This was due to the fact that the word rodeo seemed to imply recklessness and reckless driving.

The interstate moving industry in the United States maintains regulation by the FMCSA, which is part of the USDOT. With only a small staff (fewer than 20 people) available to patrol hundreds of moving companies, enforcement is difficult. As a result of such a small staff, there are in many cases, no regulations that qualify moving companies as 'reliable'. Without this guarantee, it is difficult to a consumer to make a choice. Although, moving companies can provide and often display a DOT license.

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.   The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

DOT officers of each state are generally in charge of the enforcement of the Hours of Service (HOS). These are sometimes checked when CMVs pass through weigh stations. Drivers found to be in violation of the HOS can be forced to stop driving for a certain period of time. This, in turn, may negatively affect the motor carrier's safety rating. Requests to change the HOS are a source of debate. Unfortunately, many surveys indicate drivers routinely get away with violating the HOS. Such facts have started yet another debate on whether motor carriers should be required to us EOBRs in their vehicles. Relying on paper-based log books does not always seem to enforce the HOS law put in place for the safety of everyone.

The FMCSA is a well-known division of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). It is generally responsible for the enforcement of FMCSA regulations. The driver of a CMV must keep a record of working hours via a log book. This record must reflect the total number of hours spent driving and resting, as well as the time at which the change of duty status occurred. In place of a log book, a motor carrier may choose to keep track of their hours using an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR). This automatically records the amount of time spent driving the vehicle.

A properly fitted close-coupled trailer is fitted with a rigid tow bar. It then projects from its front and hooks onto a hook on the tractor. It is important to not that it does not pivot as a draw bar does.

Business routes generally follow the original routing of the numbered route through a city or town. Beginning in the 1930s and lasting thru the 1970s was an era marking a peak in large-scale highway construction in the United States. U.S. Highways and Interstates were typically built in particular phases. Their first phase of development began with the numbered route carrying traffic through the center of a city or town. The second phase involved the construction of bypasses around the central business districts of the towns they began. As bypass construction continued, original parts of routes that had once passed straight thru a city would often become a "business route".

The 1980s were full of happening things, but in 1982 a Southern California truck driver gained short-lived fame. His name was Larry Walters, also known as "Lawn Chair Larry", for pulling a crazy stunt. He ascended to a height of 16,000 feet (4,900 m) by attaching helium balloons to a lawn chair, hence the name. Walters claims he only intended to remain floating near the ground and was shocked when his chair shot up at a rate of 1,000 feet (300 m) per minute. The inspiration for such a stunt Walters claims his poor eyesight for ruining his dreams to become an Air Force pilot.

The decade of the 70's in the United States was a memorable one, especially for the notion of truck driving. This seemed to dramatically increase popularity among trucker culture. Throughout this era, and even in today's society, truck drivers are romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws. These stereotypes were due to their use of Citizens Band (CB) radios to swap information with other drivers. Information regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. The general public took an interest in the truckers 'way of life' as well. Both drivers and the public took interest in plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and CB slang.

In 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.

Some trailers can be towed by an accessible pickup truck or van, which generally need no special permit beyond a regular license. Such examples would be enclosed toy trailers and motorcycle trailers. Specialized trailers like an open-air motorcycle trailer and bicycle trailers are accessible. Some trailers are much more accessible to small automobiles, as are some simple trailers pulled by a drawbar and riding on a single set of axles. Other trailers also have a variety, such as a utility trailer, travel trailers or campers, etc. to allow for varying sizes of tow vehicles.

A Ministry of Transport (or) Transportation is responsible for transportation within a country. Administration usually falls upon the Minister for Transport. The term may also be applied to the departments or other government agencies administering transport in a nation who do not use ministers. There are various and vast responsibilities for agencies to oversee such as road safety. Others may include civil aviation, maritime transport, rail transport and so on. They continue to develop government transportation policy and organize public transit. All while trying to maintain and construct infrastructural projects. Some ministries have additional responsibilities in related policy areas as mentioned above.

There are various versions of a moving scam, but it basically begins with a prospective client. Then the client starts to contact a moving company to request a cost estimate. In today's market, unfortunately, this often happens online or via phone calls. So essentially a customer is contacting them for a quote when the moving company may not have a license. These moving sales people are salesman prone to quoting sometimes low. Even though usually reasonable prices with no room for the movers to provide a quality service if it is a broker.

Driver's licensing has coincided throughout the European Union in order to for the complex rules to all member states. Driving a vehicle weighing more than 7.5 tons (16,535 lb) for commercial purposes requires a certain license. This specialist licence type varies depending on the use of the vehicle and number of seat. Licences first acquired after 1997, the weight was reduced to 3,500 kilograms (7,716 lb), not including trailers.

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Commercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you. Just to name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes. They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways. They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.