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5 No-Nonsense Questions:
What is Rental Truck Height Clearance?

What is Rental Truck Height Clearance

  1. There's More to Driving a Rental Truck Than People Think
  2. What Rental Companies Don't Tell You: Understanding Truck Height
  3. When Should Truck Height Be Something to Consider?
  4. Other Factors to Consider & Information You Should Obtain Prior to Driving a Rental
  5. Weigh Stations?

1. There's More to Driving a Rental Truck Than People Think

If you are planning to use a moving truck to complete your next move, then the clearance of the truck will be very important to you. The last thing you need is to damage the truck by going under an overpass that is not tall enough for you to fit under. One exception to this would be if you are moving with a one-way cargo van rental, as they are much less cumbersome. 

2. What Rental Companies Don't Tell You: Understanding Truck Height

  • The USDOT has made it a requirement that there must be at least fourteen to sixteen feet of clearance on all roads and highways in the country. So, unless you plan on driving your U-Haul truck through a historical small town or through back roads, you should not have much to worry about height-wise.
  • In a case where there is an overpass or tunnel with a low clearance, you should know that it will definitely not come by surprise. There will be multiple signs alerting you to the low clearance ahead, giving you plenty of time to find an alternate route if your truck does not fit it. There may be signs to give you directions to the alternate route as well.
  • If you are unsure whether there is enough space for you to fit, you should not take the chance. Stop immediately and make sure you fit before you attempt to drive through, only to discover that you don’t.

3. When Should Truck Height Be Something to Consider?

It is very unlikely that you will come across a situation where your truck height will make a difference. This is especially true if you are on a freeway or heavily-used road. This is thanks to the DOT regulations on height clearance, which essentially is designed to fit most moving trucks' height. Although, when choosing to rent a moving truck, it is also up to you to choose the proper size. However, there are some things that are not regulated to accommodate tall moving trucks, such as:

  • ATM drive thru’s
  • Parking garages
  • Gas station coverings
  • Fast food drive thru’s

4. Information You Should Obtain Prior to Driving a Rental

It is important to note that some things may affect truck height, such as rental company, make, and model. For information on the height of your particular truck, check the sticker located somewhere on the truck, or ask the rental company for height information.

5. Weigh Stations?

On a separate note, you may also want to ask whichever truck rental service you will be using whether or not need to stop at weigh stations throughout your move. This is also an incredibly important topic because you may unknowingly pass by a weigh station and then find yourself being given a large fine. Don't let these factors of rental trucks surprise you with fines, be prepared and make sure to ask questions prior to moving.  

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