THINGS TO DO WHEN MOVING

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Important Things To Take Care of Before Moving


  1. A Successful Move Requires Detailed Organization
  2. Administrative & Documentative Responsibilities
  3. Measure Furniture
  4. Preparation is Necessary Prior to the Move
  5. Insurance or Crating? - Get Rid of Excess Weight
  6. Moving an Office - What to Consider

1. A Successful Move Requires Detailed Organization

Keep a moving folder, binder, or computer file for all moving information like quotes and estimates, contracts, checklists, post-it notes, calendars, and other moving information. Make detailed lists about everything that is being packed. Create a system and coordinate it to match moving labels that correspond to a listing system. There are printable moving-checklist templates available online, some of which have been created in Excel.

Utilize color-specific moving labels so that each color signifies a certain room. Limit the contents of each box to only the items belonging to that room, this will save a great deal of time when unpacking. Pack heavy items like books in small boxes and lightweight items in larger boxes.

things to do when moving

2. Administrative & Documentative Responsibilities 

Try to take care of any administrative responsibilities like arranging school transfers for the children to their new school, before moving. State to state and cross country movers especially will want to complete their paperwork early in order to know which files to keep readily available. It will then be easier to take care of any special circumstances that may arise, and make documentation that may be required during the move more easily accessible.

Things To Do When Moving

3. Measure Furniture

If possible, pre-measure the new residence in order to make sure that all of the present furniture will fit in when everything is arranged. It’s possible that some things must be placed in storage, sold, or given away. Taking the measurements beforehand has the potential to reduce costs, by bringing only the furniture and belongings that are desired and that will fit.

 

Most movers will not want to transport items back out of the home once they have been delivered, and would also prefer to avoid the crowding and congestion.

4. Preparation is Necessary Prior to the Move

Keep an overnight bag filled with sheets for the bed, blankets, toothpaste, toothbrush, a roll of toilet paper, and paper/plastic plates and utensils, and any medicines that are needed, so that locating these items after everything is delivered does not become a time-consuming and laborious strain.An overnight bag is especially useful if the entire household has been professionally packed.

5. Insurance or Crating? - Get Rid of Excess Weight

When utilizing the services of professional packers, think about purchasing insurance, which will reimburse movers if an accident should occur. Movers who own valuables like fine paintings can protect their assets with professional crating. If trying to save on professional moving services, reduce the total weight by getting rid of excess belongings.

6. Moving an Office - What to Consider

When moving an office communication is key. Make sure that suppliers, clients, and services remain updated about the move and are provided with the new contact information. Activate the power, telephone lines, and the internet early, in advance of the move, to avoid delays. Book any special technical help who will, for example, connect technical systems like computers, copiers, and sophisticated communications, in advance as well so that the proper professionals are chosen and at reasonable prices. Ensure that moving vans and trucks have a place nearby to park and where there is plenty of time for loading and unloading. The move will probably take several hours, and the parking space should not be too far away since the moving company might charge for the distance. For security, make a note of the registration shipment number and keep it on hand along with the telephone number in the case that questions or concerns arise during transport.

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