CONSIDERATIONS MOVING WEST COAST TO THE EAST COAST

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Moving from the West Coast to the East Coast

east to west coast

  1. East Coast Living to West Coast Might Be a Lifestyle Shocker
  2. Coast to Coast Moving With the Whole Family 
  3. Moving That Far Isn't Cheap: Think About What You're Bringing
  4. Look Into Moving Companies
  5. Keep Your Business & Documents Organized

1. East Coast Living to West Coast Might Be a Lifestyle Shocker 

Moving from one coast to another is not only a task that requires careful planning and expense, it involves plenty of preparation. Think about it. Living on the east coast is an entirely different experience than living on the west coast. The people are different, the climate is different, the way you approach day to day living is different. There are a lot of considerations to take into account when you make the move from one coast to the other, and not all of them involve the moving process by itself.

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2. Coast to Coast Moving With the Whole Family

Family considerations rank high among things to consider when moving from the west coast to the east coast. Is your family going to be prepared for the drastic changes in climate and social environments? The contrast in weather on the coasts may require investment in a new wardrobe for all of your family members, which is a cost factor to consider when you make a move of this magnitude. Also, activities your family members engage in on one coast may not be popular or as easy to do on another coast, while options for new activities may be present.

Things To Consider When Moving

3. Moving That Far Isn't Cheap: Think About What You're Bringing

Moving your possessions is another consideration. The further you move, the more expensive it can be, so one of the things to consider when moving from the west coast to the east coast is what to take with you. It’s important not to leave anything behind that you absolutely need or that can’t be replaced, but if you can be without it or find something to replace it when you reach your destination, consider leaving behind those items.

4. Look Into Moving Companies

The less you have to move, the less you will spend on the cost of moving. Shop around for your moving company. This is important.

The cost of moving is not going to be cheap, but when you are moving from one coast to another, a moving company is often the best way to go.


This isn’t like moving down the street where you can do it yourself over the course of several hours or days. Your possessions will need to be moved at the same time. A moving company is the only reasonable way to go, but by shopping around, you can ensure the best deal. Don’t be afraid to go online and get reviews of any company you consider.

5. Keep Your Business & Documents Organized

One of the most important things to consider when moving from the west coast to the east coast is your business. Make sure all of your mail has been forwarded and you’ve arranged for the transfer of important medical records and school records that will be needed to help facilitate the smooth transition of your family’s lifestyle. Making a list of things to consider when moving from the west coast to the east coast or vice versa is one way to lessen the stress of moving and help prepare your family so they will enjoy their new home to its fullest potential.

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A trailer is not very difficult to categorize. In general, it is an unpowered vehicle towed by a powered vehicle. Trailers are most commonly used for the transport of goods and materials. Although some do enjoy recreational usage of trailers as well. 

A moving company, removalist, or van line are all companies that help people as well as other businesses to move their good from one place to another. With many inclusive services for relocation like packing, loading, moving, unloading, unpacking and arranging of items can all be taken care of for you. Some services may include cleaning the place and have warehousing facilities.

With the partial deregulation of the trucking industry in 1980 by the Motor Carrier Act, trucking companies increased. The workforce was drastically de-unionized. As a result, drivers received a lower pay overall. Losing its spotlight in the popular culture, trucking had become less intimate as some unspoken competition broke out. However, the deregulation only increased the competition and productivity with the trucking industry as a whole. This was beneficial to the America consumer by reducing costs. In 1982 the Surface Transportation Assistance Act established a federal minimum truck weight limits. Thus, trucks were finally standardized truck size and weight limits across the country. This was also put in to place so that across country traffic on the Interstate Highways resolved the issue of the 'barrier states'.

Another film released in 1975, White Line Fever, also involved truck drivers. It tells the story of a Vietnam War veteran who returns home to take over his father's trucking business. But, he soon finds that corrupt shippers are trying to force him to carry illegal contraband. While endorsing another negative connotation towards the trucking industry, it does portray truck drivers with a certain wanderlust.

As most people have experienced, moving does involve having the appropriate materials. Some materials you might find at home or may be more resourceful to save money while others may choose to pay for everything. Either way materials such as boxes, paper, tape, and bubble wrap with which to pack box-able and/or protect fragile household goods. It is also used to consolidate the carrying and stacking on moving day. Self-service moving companies offer another viable option. It involves the person moving buying a space on one or more trailers or shipping containers. These containers are then professionally driven to the new location.

A moving scam is a scam by a moving company in which the company provides an estimate, loads the goods, then states a much higher price to deliver the goods, effectively holding the goods as lien but does this without do a change of order or revised estimate.

The interstate moving industry in the United States maintains regulation by the FMCSA, which is part of the USDOT. With only a small staff (fewer than 20 people) available to patrol hundreds of moving companies, enforcement is difficult. As a result of such a small staff, there are in many cases, no regulations that qualify moving companies as 'reliable'. Without this guarantee, it is difficult to a consumer to make a choice. Although, moving companies can provide and often display a DOT license.

The United States' Interstate Highway System is full of bypasses and loops with the designation of a three-digit number. Usually beginning with an even digit, it is important to note that this pattern is highly inconsistent. For example, in Des Moines, Iowa the genuine bypass is the main route. More specifically, it is Interstate 35 and Interstate 80, with the loop into downtown Des Moines being Interstate 235. As it is illustrated in this example, they do not always consistently begin with an even number. However, the 'correct' designation is exemplified in Omaha, Nebraska. In Omaha, Interstate 480 traverses the downtown area, which is bypassed by Interstate 80, Interstate 680, and Interstate 95. Interstate 95 then in turn goes through Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Furthermore, Interstate 295 is the bypass around Philadelphia, which leads into New Jersey. Although this can all be rather confusing, it is most important to understand the Interstate Highway System and the role bypasses play.

Without strong land use controls, buildings are too often built in town right along a bypass. This results with the conversion of it into an ordinary town road, resulting in the bypass becoming as congested as the local streets. On the contrary, a bypass is intended to avoid such local street congestion. Gas stations, shopping centers, along with various other businesses are often built alongside them. They are built in hopes of easing accessibility, while home are ideally avoided for noise reasons.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is an agency within the United States Department of Transportation. The purpose of the FMCSA is to regulate safety within the trucking and moving industry in the United States. The FMCSA enforces safety precautions that reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities involving large trucks and buses.

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.   The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

A properly fitted close-coupled trailer is fitted with a rigid tow bar. It then projects from its front and hooks onto a hook on the tractor. It is important to not that it does not pivot as a draw bar does.

In 1986 Stephen King released horror film "Maximum Overdrive", a campy kind of story. It is really about trucks that become animated due to radiation emanating from a passing comet. Oddly enough, the trucks force humans to pump their diesel fuel. Their leader is portrayed as resembling Spider-Man's antagonist Green Goblin.

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The feature film "Joy Ride" premiered in 2001, portraying the story of two college-age brothers who by a CB radio while taking a road trip. Although the plot seems lighthearted, it takes a quick turn after one of the brothers attempts a prank on an unknown truck driver. They soon find out the dangerous intentions of this killer driver, who is set on getting his revenge. Seven years later in 2008 the sequel "Joy Ride 2: Dead Ahead" came out on DVD only. Similar to its predecessor, the plot involves another murdering truck driver, a.k.a "Rusty Nail". He essentially plays psychological mind games with a young couple on a road trip.

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