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Do I Need Self-Storage Insurance?


Self storage insurance

  1. Typically No.
  2. Is it All a Scam?
  3. Reasoning Behind It All...
  4. Always Best to Double Check 
  5. Self-Storage Insurance Explained

1. Typically No.

In short, it is not required for you to have self-storage insurance. Keep in mind, however, that self-storages do not operate the same way that moving companies do, meaning there is no insurance coverage included in the monthly rate for your storage. When you are booking a self-storage, the storage manager will probably not tell you that a lot of your items may already be covered under another insurance policy that you have. If you have homeowners or renters insurance, then these policies will still be effective for your goods, even if they are not in your home.

2. Is It All a Scam?

If your goods are covered under an insurance policy, then why should you still consider having storage insurance? To answer briefly, there is no reason to have storage insurance if you already have an existing homeowners insurance or renters insurance policy.  The storage facility wants to make a profit off of your business. Basically, storage facilities are playing on your fears to get you to give them more money.

3. Reasoning Behind It All...

Before you scream at your local self-storage manager, keep in mind that a lot of them are likely not aware that they are manipulating you. They are urged to recommend self-storage insurance to all new customers by their corporate managers. The manager of the facility is only there to, you guessed it, manage the facility. Some professionals aren’t associated with the insurance companies. Unfortunately, some cases of manipulation can be very extreme.

Some storage facilities require you to have your items insured before moving them into the unit. If the storage facility requires insurance, they are probably protecting themselves from being involved in any lawsuits for damage of your items. If this happens to be the case for you, then you should acquire proof of insurance from your homeowner's insurance company. Sometimes, storage units do not tell the renter that they need insurance until the time they are moving in, then they want insurance immediately. In these cases, the company will force you to purchase a policy from them. So, it is always better to have proof of insurance.

4. Always Best to Double Check 

If you are still unsure of your need to purchase self-storage insurance, contact Moving Authority. We can help you work through the questions you may have, as well as find you an excellent mover to get your goods to a self-storage. This is just another way Moving Authority helps you move.

5. Self-Storage Insurance Explained

If you are moving into a new home, then there is a relatively large chance that you will rent a self-service storage unit. Whether it be because of your new home is not ready to move all of your items in yet, or you aren’t ready to move everything yet, renting a storage unit is a good way to keep your goods safe.

A lot of people do not know that storage insurance exists. When you arrive at the local storage facility, you will most likely be asked if you have storage insurance. You may have homeowners insurance or renters insurance, but storage insurance is something that is much less popular. The concept of storage insurance is not very complicated. Since most of your household items are sitting in a storage facility, they are vulnerable to lose as a result of multiple different circumstances.

If there were a flood in the storage unit, for example, your goods would be damaged. However, there are a lot of storage units that claim no responsibility for your goods when they are inside of your facility. When the storage manager explains this to you, there is a very high chance that you will not even consider what is being said, likely because you don’t think you need storage insurance.

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